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We deliver the best recruitment news and advice to the Tax, Legal, Finance, HR and Marketing sectors, including market updates, CV tips, interview advice, and exclusive interviews.

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The 12 Perks of a New Tax Role

On the first day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me A role in a new tax team On the second day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me Flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the third day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me An easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the fourth day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me Recognition for my work, an easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the fifth day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me A lovely pay rise, recognition for my work, an easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the sixth day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me A whole new challenge, a lovely pay rise, recognition for my work, an easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the seventh day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me Wonderful co-workers, a whole new challenge, a lovely pay rise, recognition for my work, an easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the eighth day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me A brand new office, wonderful co-workers, a whole new challenge, a lovely pay rise, recognition for my work, an easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the ninth day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me One big promotion, a brand new office, wonderful co-workers, a whole new challenge, a lovely pay rise, recognition for my work, an easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the tenth day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me Lots of progression, one big promotion, a brand new office, wonderful co-workers, a whole new challenge, a lovely pay rise, recognition for my work, an easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the eleventh day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me Free lunch vouchers, lots of progression, one big promotion, a brand new office, wonderful co-workers, a whole new challenge, a lovely pay rise, recognition for my work, an easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team On the twelfth day of Christmas, my recruiter sold to me Excellent culture, free lunch vouchers, lots of progression, one big promotion, a brand new office, wonderful co-workers, a whole new challenge, a lovely pay rise, recognition for my work, an easier commute, flexible working and a role in a new tax team Take a look at our latest roles here! For a confidential chat about opportunities in the tax market and to discuss your next role, contact Rebecca English on 020 7269 6320 or rebecca.english@pro-tax.co.uk.

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The Pro-Group Christmas Quiz 2019

On Wednesday 4th December, Pro-Recruitment Group held its yearly infamous Christmas Quiz. We welcomed the best and brightest from across the worlds of Tax, Legal, Finance, HR and Marketing to compete in our annual competition to win the title of 'Pro-Group Christmas Quiz Champions 2019'. It's that time of year again where we welcome our clients to compete in our annual Christmas Quiz, which this year was held at the 5* Jury's Inn Hotel in Holborn. Everyone welcomed the festive spirit and 22 teams went head-to-head against one another to win first prize! Pro's Managing Director Pat Keogh hosted this year's quiz alongside Jennifer Nelson, Manager of Pro-Tax's Regional team, and the competition between teams was evident from the outset! Rounds one to three saw Pat and Jen asking questions from the categories of TV & Film, General Knowledge and Sport - we learned that Game of Thrones had 73 episodes in total, reminisced about Gareth Southgate's infamous waistcoats, and who knew that the first living creature in space was a fruit fly! The picture round is always a winner and this year was no different. "Ohh I know him - what's his name again", and "Who on earth is that" were some of the most common phrases heard around the room, along with"That's that girl from Love Island!" Halfway through the night, everyone helped themselves to some well-deserved food while the first half of the quiz was marked and teams were given their ranking order - it was a close contest and needless to say people's competitive natures were revealed even more! The second half of the evening saw the 22 teams competing in the final few rounds for first prize! The Science & Nature round came first with people attempting to figure out the average number of teeth an adult has - which isn't the easiest thing to do after free-flowing drinks all evening... Then came our 'Famous Firsts' rounds which proved to be a point of contention for many teams with people debating "Oxford vs. Cambridge" for the first university built in the UK. The 'What Comes Next' round really put teams to the test - figuring out who came next after Monica, Erica and Rita in Mambo Number 5 was something that could only be solved by people singing until they got to Tina! One of the evening's highlights was the final (and most popular) music round. We played Old Town Road backwards which caused confusion up and down the room and challenged people with what year Destiny's Child's 'Bootylicious' was released. To top it off, we had the whole room singing Backstreet Boys and a medley from the Greatest Showman! Answer sheets were scored and totals counted, and Jen was responsible for the big reveal. Coming in last and winning the coveted last place Christmas puddings were Deloitte's 'Accountaholics'! We had a three-way tie for second place - Gunnercooke's 'George Quizra', the 'Quizmas Crackers' from Fitzgerald & Law, and from Sony, the 'Jammy Tax Dodgers' - which could only mean one thing... a tiebreaker challenge! One representative from each team was called to the front to guess how many chocolates were in the jar, and the 'Quizmas Crackers' guessed the closest winning them second place. And winning by only 2 points, and crowned the champions of Pro's 2019 Christmas Quiz were the 'Noel-It-Alls' from Simmons Gainsford! A huge thank-you to everyone who came along and participated - we hope you all had a fantastic evening and enjoyed it as much as we did! Special thank you to all the staff at Pro who make the evening such a success every year. We look forward to seeing you all again in 2020! View the Christmas Quiz 2019 Questions and Answers here! To find out about upcoming Pro-Recruitment events or to speak to us about joining the Pro family or your recruitment needs, contact Loren von Sternberg on 020 7269 6358 or loren@pro-recruitment.co.uk.

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Charity Times - 03/12/2019

COMMUNICATION The young think better of charity chiefs than older people People under 45 are more inclined to trust charity chief executives to tell the truth than older people, according to Ipsos Mori's Veracity Index 2019 Trust in Professions Survey. Overall, the public's trust in charity chief executives has declined, according to the poll of 1,020 people. Less than half of respondents (45%) said charity leaders are likely to tell the truth – down 3% from last year. Ipsos found that 58% of people under the age of 45 believed charity chief executives would tell the truth, and exactly the same share aged 45 and over said the opposite. The study suggests charity chiefs are less trusted than doctors, who 90% of people said were likely to tell the truth, teachers (89%), and members of the clergy (65%). But charity leaders are more trusted to tell the truth than bankers (43%), estate agents (30%), journalists (26%) and government ministers in Westminster (17%), according to the poll. Kristiana Wrixon, head of policy at ACEVO, said: "This poll is cause for reflection but not necessarily alarm . . . Charity leaders should, and mostly do, act transparently, responsibly and in line with their charitable objectives. They should be confident that they are trusted by the community they serve and work alongside. Trust, especially in uncertain times, can be volatile and ACEVO will continue to champion the work of civil society CEOs to build trust in the role of charity in our society." Third Force News Civil Society STRATEGY Some charities have almost no digital activity The sixth edition of Lloyds Bank’s Charity Digital Index finds that 13% (26,000) of charities have had almost no digital activity in 2019 – an increase of 10,000 on last year. Nevertheless, the report notes that there are 24,000 more charities which are almost "digital by default" when compared to last year, and overall, charities are reporting more benefits to being online. Charity Bank CEO Ed Siegel said: "Investing in technology drives efficiencies throughout any business, can open up new streams of income generation and protect organisations from the risk of cyber-attacks; according to official data one in five charities have experienced a cyber breach in the last year. However, it’s also really important to invest in the workforce’s digital skills to ensure it is being used as effectively as possible, to maximise the benefits in the years to come." Meanwhile, a report from the Weston Charity Awards suggests that fewer small charities are prioritising digital skills. Only 33% of small charity leaders listed IT and digital skills as one of their three priority areas for staff this year. Elsewhere, the report found that half of small charity leaders are working on improving diversity and inclusion among their trustees; a quarter say they need to do more in this area. UKFundraising Civil Society Charity Digital News BofE chief economist wants sector productivity review Bank of England chief economist Andy Haldane says the charity sector needs a productivity review. Mr Haldane, who is also the co-founder of Pro Bono Economics, writes in the December edition of Charity Finance magazine that the charity sector needs an equivalent of the public sector’s Atkinson Report, which was commissioned by the government to identify improvements to how the public sector measured productivity. “What we need today is the equivalent of the Atkinson Review for the third sector: an authoritative account of what a coherent and comprehensive measurement framework for the charitable would look like and how to develop it, recognising the different conceptions of ‘value’ and ‘productivity’ this gives rise to,” he writes. Civil Society Transforming small charity service delivery with AI Charity Digital News hosts a video which looks at how artificial intelligence is helping smaller charities drive impact. The video is a collaboration between food bank The Welcome Centre and charity data partner DataKind, and is designed to dispel the notion that AI and machine learning are beyond the reach of most small charities. Charity Digital News FUNDRAISING Charity Bank raises nearly £5m in subordinated debt Nearly £5m in subordinated debt has been raised by Charity Bank. The successful fundraising, and also plans to attract an additional £10m in new equity investment from charities, trusts and foundations, will enable Charity Bank to increase its support for the social sector and expand its capacity to respond to rising demand for repayable finance. Charity Bank CEO Ed Siegel said: “We believe that the current expansion of our investor base represents a potentially very powerful opportunity for many charities, trusts and foundations looking to use social investment as one means to achieve their social objectives. We will leverage every pound of the investment we raise to make around £8 of loans to help charities and social enterprises fulfil their missions and tackle some of the most challenging issues facing UK society today.” He added: “Further equity investment will help Charity Bank become an enduring institution that can continue responding to the needs of the sector and allow more savers to put their money to work for the benefit of society." UKFundraising National UK Charity Week has started Charities are celebrating UK Charity Week. The event is always held within the first full week of December, and is this year sponsored by TheGivingMachine. Lee Rayment, the founder of UK Charity Week, said: “There is a real sense on our streets that society and community spirit in the UK has taken a big hammering with so much negative media and other influences taking its toll on morale. This year, we want to work to bridge that divide and to remind people that our communities cannot thrive without unity, and here we have so many charities playing a pivotal role on our behalf.” Charity Today Charity Today It's Giving Tuesday Around 3,200 charities and businesses across the UK are participating in today’s Giving Tuesday, the annual global day for raising money and awareness for good causes. PayPal is match funding donations made by anyone using PayPal on the PayPal UK fundraising page or the PayPal App to the PayPal Giving Fund up to £150,000. RBS will also be matching staff payroll giving contributions and promoting Giving Tuesday to its more than 1.5 million MyReward Customers. Meanwhile, eBay UK will donate 5p for every transaction on ebay.co.uk, and 10p if a customer purchases two or more items, to The Prince’s Trust. UKFundraising Third Force News UKFundraising Aids charity hooks up with dating app Mobile dating app Happn is donating 5% of the money it generated on World Aids Day (December 1st) to help not-for-profit body HIV/Aids campaign (Red) in its work in developing countries. The collaboration continues throughout this month, with users of the app being invited to take part in (Red)’s ‘Shopathon’ campaign. Charity Digital News LEGAL Charity threatens legal action against NHS England NHS England has been threatened with legal action after it blocked the publication of a major independent report into maternity care in the NHS. Hospital bosses delayed the release of the Mothers and Babies: Reducing Risk through Audits and Confidential Enquiries across the UK (MBRRACE) report, citing purdah – the ban on civil servants publishing politically sensitive information during an election period. Now Birthrights, a charity that promotes human rights in maternity care, has sent a legal warning to Simon Stevens, chief executive of the NHS in England, demanding he make the report public without delay. The Independent CAMPAIGNS Misogyny should be standalone offence, say charities Women’s charities says misogyny should be a standalone offence in Scotland, according to a report from feminist policy organisation Engender. Laws around hate crimes are currently being reviewed, with MSPs deciding between introducing a “gender hostility” aggravation and the creation of a standalone offence. Engender said that the “gender hostility” route – which would add gender or sex to the list of characteristics already covered by hate crime legislation – would not solve the problem of misogyny, and could even undermine the existing policy. Emma Ritch, Engender executive director, said: “Misogynistic harassment harms individual women and restricts all women and girls’ capacity to participate fully in public life. We know from international examples where this has been tried, that simply adding gender to a list of hate crime aggravations has only resulted in a handful of investigations and prosecutions of hate crimes targeted at women. This is not enough to tackle the egregious misogynistic abuse women and girls face in schools, workplaces, online, and in public space. We need a new approach.” Third Force News Charity issues winter homelessness warning The Salvation Army has warned that hundreds of homeless people are likely to die over the winter, and is calling for urgent investment in support services, particularly for those with “complex, multiple needs,” such as drug abuse, childhood trauma and relationship breakdown. While charities and local authorities will open emergency night shelters as temperatures fall, criteria will differ from location to location, creating a postcode lottery for shelter. The Observer spoke to Salvation Army captain John Clifton, who said that “any extreme weather conditions exacerbate existing health problems and makes those underlying problems like mental health or addiction more difficult to cope with,” adding that the charity sees a “high proportion of people who can’t access state benefits and it makes it difficult for them.” The Observer Poppyscotland takes Bud on tour Poppyscotland has developed an 18-tonne transforming exhibition-on-wheels, Bud, that will tour schools, community spaces and events over the next four years to give the public a deeper understanding of remembrance and the role of the poppy in modern Scottish society. Bud will visit all 32 local authority areas over the coming years. Mark Bibbey, the charity’s chief executive, said: “Over the next four years, Bud will play an important role in exploring the history of remembrance, through the eyes of veterans and ex-service men and women.” Edinburgh Evening News Homeless people need their dogs Housing providers are being urged to support homeless people in allowing them to keep their dogs. Homelessness charity Simon Community Scotland is working with Dogs Trust to help direct the response to homeless people and their pets. Their Paws for Thought guidance highlights the positive role dogs can play in people's lives and offers to support social landlords in helping people who have experienced homelessness to maintain their relationships with their pets. BBC News ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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November 2019: Tax Movers and Shakers

Stay up-to-date with the movers and shakers in the tax sector. Here are the key movements in November 2019: PRACTICE LONDON AND CITY Partners PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) has appointed Angus Johnston as UK Leader of Real Estate. He has been with PwC for 30 years and worked extensively advising major real estate fund and sovereign wealth fund clients. RSM has appointed Irfan Butt as a Tax Partner in its Real Estate and Construction team. Butt joins from PwC where he spent 13 years providing tax advice to real estate funds and infrastructure & distressed debt funds. During this time, he was also involved in a large number of UK and pan-European M&A transactions involving funds and institutional investors. Smith & Williamson has announced that its shareholders have approved the merger with Tilney following meetings on 13th November 2019. Mazars has appointed Frank Strachan as Partner and Head of Tax Investigations. He joins from law firm Edwin Coe, where he was Head of Tax. Strachan has over 30 years’ experience in representing clients subject to HMRC investigations. Strachan’s career also includes Grant Thornton and KPMG. Senior Appointments FTI Consulting has announced that Graham Tilbury has joined as a Managing Director in the tax advisory practice in London within the firm’s corporate finance & restructuring segment, where he will lead a new tax technology advisory service offering. Tilbury has significant experience working with businesses on a wide variety of tax technology projects for more than 25 years. SOUTH WEST Partners PwC has announced that Nick Morgan, with 20 years’ experience in the region, will become the firm’s first clients and markets regional lead for West and Wales. He was most recently PwC’s Tax Leader in the West. NORTH WEST Senior Appointments Cowgill Holloway has appointed three new Senior Advisors to its tax team. Emma Bowles, who was previously advising entrepreneurial clients at Grant Thornton, has joined the team as Tax Manager and Lyndsey Hay joins from Booth Ainsworth as a Personal Tax Manager. Abigail O’Neill has joined as VAT Manager from Ernst & Young (EY) where she advised multinational corporates, the NHS and charities on VAT matters. Mark Kearsley has been promoted to Tax Director at DSG Chartered Accountants. He has been with the firm for nearly ten years. YORKSHIRE AND HUMBER Partners BDO has appointed Vanessa Lee as a Tax Partner in the Private Client Team based in the Leeds office. With more than 22 years’ experience, and positions in EY and Pwc, Lee advises high-net-worth individuals, families, family offices and trustees on complex tax planning. She will support the tax team across Yorkshire and the North West on all aspects of private client tax issues. COMMERCE & INDUSTRY Alex Carlyle has been appointed the Global Tax Director at Cambridge University Press. A Big 4 background with Deloitte and KPMG, Alex spent 3 and half years as Head of Tax at News UK before making the move. BVI Medical have brought in Charlotte O’Dea as Global Tax Manager. Charlotte can be considered as somewhat of a specialist within the pharmaceutical space having previously held positions with GSK, Hikma and Shire. Gary Sin is the new Head of Tax at Cain International. Gary has spent time in the Big 4 with EY, PwC and KPMG and has spent time in-house with Barings as their Real Estate Tax Director. For more information about this article, or to speak to Rebecca about your recruiting needs or Tax jobs in London or Nationwide, contact her on 02072696320 or rebecca.english@pro-tax.co.uk. Back to Tax Movers & Shakers Archive >>

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November 2019: Finance Movers and Shakers

Stay up-to-date with the movers and shakers in the finance sector. Here are the key movements in November 2019: Former Nestlé UK chair and CEO Dame Fiona Kendrick is the new Chair of PWC’s Public Interest Body (PIB). She will take over from Lord Gus O’Donnell who is leaving at the end of December after four years in the role. Dame Fiona left Nestlé last December after a career of nearly 40 years during which she held a variety of posts both in the UK and overseas. economia.icaew.com Andrew Johnston joins FRC Conduct Committee. The Financial Reporting Council’s (FRC) Conduct Committee oversees the audit regulator’s enforcement work. Andrew Johnston took his seat on the committee on 9 November. As well as government actuary he was also a member of the management board administering the World Trade Organisation pension plan. economia.icaew.com RSM has appointed Greg Moreton as a Partner to lead its National Debt Advisory practice. Moreton has over 20 years’ experience as a specialist debt advisory professional, with a core focus on assisting middle-market businesses to raise and renegotiate debt finance. financemoves.co.uk BDO has appointed Oliver Back as a Partner and Head of the new Contract and Commercial Risk practice based in the London office. Back will help clients to manage risk and achieve greater value from their third party relationships on both the buy and sell-side. Back joins BDO from PWC and has also worked at EY. Financemoves.co.uk Specialist business advisory firm FRP has promoted Alex Sargeant to Director in the Corporate Finance team based in the Bristol office. He has 10 years’ experience and joined the firm in 2017 having previously specialised in financial due diligence at Deloitte. He specialises in sell-side and buy-side corporate finance advisory, primarily for business owners and private equity investors accountancydaily.co For more information about this article, or to speak to Callum about your recruiting needs or Finance jobs in London or Nationwide, contact him on 02072696369 or callum.macrae@pro-finance.co.uk. Back to Finance Movers & Shakers Archive >>

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November 2019: Legal Movers and Shakers

Stay up-to-date with the movers and shakers in the legal sector. Here are the key movements in November 2019: Partner Kevin Roberts is moving to Cadwalader after having spent over ten years at Morrison & Foerster. Roberts is a litigator specialising in White Collar Crime. Roberts will be an integral member of the US White Collar defence and investigations team’s transatlantic expansion. Carl Bradshaw is moving to Goodwin Procter after having spent 9 years at Kirkland & Ellis and being Partner there since 2015. As a strong Private Equity and M&A Partner who specialises in technology and life sciences, Bradshaw will join a quickly developing practice. Andrew Sackey has joined Pinsent Masons after twelve years at HM Revenue & Customs. Sackey is a tax and litigation Lawyer who will also be involved in five major sectors at Pinsent Masons including; infrastructure, real estate, energy, technology and financial services. Partner Steve Curtis is joining Latham & Watkins from Clifford Chance having been at Clifford Chance since 1991 when he joined as an articled clerk. Specialising in structured finance in the real estate finance and infrastructure sectors, Curtis will be a vital part of the practice. For more information about this article, or to speak to Aaron Burton about your recruiting needs or Legal jobs in London or Nationwide, contact him on 020 7269 6350 or aaron.burton@pro-legal.co.uk. Back to Legal Movers & Shakers Archive >>

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The Perfect Finance CV

Creating the ideal CV can be a tricky task, but the perfect Finance CV is the very first step towards your dream job. To avoid your CV being dismissed and missing out on that all-important job interview, there are things you need to consider, and our specialist finance recruiters have provided all the information you need to create that perfect CV! Unlike ticking the ‘open to opportunities’ box on LinkedIn, submitting your CV symbolises an active interest in a role. Best to avoid the mentality of “just send my CV and see what they come back with”. If the role is worth applying for at all, then this is presumably worth doing with your best foot forward. A specialist finance recruiter will likely see over 100 CVs each week. With both your experience and motivations in mind, they should be able to consult on: (1) the common mistakes to avoid and (2) how best to tailor your CV and exhibit your strengths. We have provided a general step-by-step guide on how to format your CV in the candidate-scarce and technically-niche finance market, which includes: General formatting: keep it simple The executive summary: lose the fluff Employment history: bullet point what you did The application: tailor your CV before applying Quick disclaimer: ‘the perfect CV’ does not reference a stereotypically perfect career as it may appear on paper, though exemplar excerpts have been included below for illustration. 1. General CV formatting: keep it simple. Your experience should speak for itself in a way that is easily comparable with other CVs. Send your CV to your recruiter in Word (not PDF) format and say goodbye to: Flashy fonts (keep it to black, Arial size 11) Convoluted layouts (stay away from using any kind of columns) Photographs Charts/images ranking your skills The length of your CV is entirely dependent on your seniority. You would ideally want about half a page per role, outlining your key achievements, responsibilities, and clients. This means that the CV of a newly-qualified accountant who has just completed their training is likely to be 1-2 pages long, whereas a Senior Manager or Director's CV is more likely to be up to 6 pages long depending on the number of moves and responsibilities they have had throughout their finance career. 2. The executive summary: lose the fluff. Put yourself in the hiring Partners shoes - what would you want to see from the CV of a potential employee? Within the first half-page, your CV should provide an overview of the most important details, including the cost and relevance of your candidacy: Your name Desired location Right to work Relevant qualifications and education Notice period Languages spoken Systems experience Promises of personal qualities are near impossible to make credible if written in the first-person. Recognise the benefits of having your CV written in the third person - using the pronouns “I”, “me”, “my”, “mine”, “our” or “we” on your CV dampens the third-party ‘sell’ before you really need to. In the niche and candidate-scarce finance market, employers are generally just not that interested in the finer details of your education. Key things to include in the education section of your CV are: Focus on the credentials themselves Grade for your degree A-Level subjects and grades Awards/scholarships Places and year of study CANDIDATE: [NAME] LOCATION: London RIGHT TO WORK: UK Citizen QUALIFICATIONS: ACA (2015) – 1st Time Passes AAT (2012) - 1st Time Passes EDUCATION: University of Sheffield BSc, Mathematics (2011): 1st Class Honours [Sixth Form College] A-Levels (2008): A - Mathematics A - Economics B - German AVAILABILITY: 3 Months (negotiable) LANGUAGES: German SYSTEMS EXPERIENCE: Sage Xero, Quickbooks and Caseware 3. Employment history: bullet-point what you did. This section should be in bullet-points for ease of accessibility, similar to the format you would ordinarily see in job specifications. Showcase your most relevant experiences and achievements, and even if you've worked at one company, be sure to show your progression internally. This section should not detail what your team did - bullet pointing what ‘you’ did means focusing on your own actions/achievements. In instances where a collaborative effort was made, the focus should be on your personal contribution to the wider effort. Include client examples and turnovers, as well as how many engagements you have led or been involved with, as this will provide insight into your working routine. In bullet pointing what you ‘did’, it is important to realise what can and cannot be demonstrated on a CV. Steer away from an emphasis what you ‘learned’, ‘developed’ or ‘demonstrated’, which are not only difficult to bring to life on a CV credibly, but are also more relevant at interview stage. Keep the content to the job you performed, responsibilities fulfilled and value-added. Your CV will often need to get past a generalist finance researcher/HR professional before even being seen by a finance specialist. Include buzzwords from the person specification, such as “IFRS”, “ACA” or “leading audits” for instance. Consider the buzzwords seen on the type of job specifications you are interested in and be sure to include those on your CV where applicable. Other general points for this section: Keep it chronological, in descending order of recency Format promotions/secondments under the same employment term where possible Include the location (city) where each position was held Consider omitting roles held prior to your beginning your formal qualification 4. The application: tailor your CV before applying. No one job or company is the same, so make sure that your finance CV is tailored to the position and firm that you are applying to, whether is this is one of the Big 4, Top 20, or a boutique firm. Highlight the main reasons you would be suitable for the position, and try to echo the organisation's corporate values and what the job specification says they are looking for throughout your application. In summary, your finance CV is first and foremost a sales document highlighting your strengths and skillsets. Ensure that it is formatted in the most easily readable and accessible manner, and make sure it plays to your strengths and is targeted to the role you are applying to. This is the case no matter the role, whether you are a Corporate Finance Associate or an Audit & Accounts Senior Manager. Last but not least, don't forget to check your spelling, grammar, and punctuation throughout. Looking for advice on tailoring your CV, options in your search, or have a request for our next blog? Contact Callum MacRae on 020 7269 6369 or callum.macrae@pro-finance.co.uk.

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The Perfect Legal CV

Creating the ideal CV can be a tricky task, but the perfect Legal CV is the very first step towards your dream job. To avoid your CV being dismissed and missing out on that all-important job interview, there are things you need to consider, and our specialist legal recruiters have provided all the information you need to create that perfect CV! Unlike ticking the ‘open to opportunities’ box on LinkedIn, submitting your CV symbolises an active interest in a role. Best to avoid the mentality of “just send my CV and see what they come back with”. If the role is worth applying for at all, then this is presumably worth doing with your best foot forward. A specialist legal recruiter will likely see over 100 CVs each week. With both your experience and motivations in mind, they should be able to consult on: (1) the common mistakes to avoid and (2) how best to tailor your CV and exhibit your strengths. The first matter is straightforward enough, forming the contents of general advice here: General formatting: keep it simple The executive summary: lose the fluff Work experience: bullet point what you did Education and Qualifications: less can be more We have provided a general step-by-step guide on how to format your CV in the legal market. Quick disclaimer: ‘the perfect CV’ does not reference a stereotypically perfect career as it may appear on paper, though exemplar excerpts have been included below for illustration. 1. General CV formatting: keep it simple. Your experience should speak for itself in a way that is easily comparable with other CVs. Send your CV to your recruiter in Word (not PDF) format and say goodbye to: Flashy fonts (keep it to black, Arial size 11) Convoluted layouts (stay away from using any kind of columns) Photographs Charts/images ranking your skills Regarding length, the average length of a good legal CV is 3-4 pages: the 2-page rule is a myth in the legal industry and anything more than 5 pages is too long! 1 page is far too short because Legal Partners like to see plenty of detail around what you've done, the type of clients you have worked with, and most importantly what part you played on each matter. This is all essential for Partners to get a flavour of your experience and an idea of what you could add to their legal team. 2. The executive summary: lose the fluff. Within the first half-page, your CV should provide an overview of the most important details and your experience to date, including: Your name City/town Right to work Relevant qualifications Notice period Languages spoken (if pertinent to the role) Synopsis The synopsis is an important part of telling your story to third parties. However, promises of personal qualities are near impossible to make credible if written in the first-person. When sending your CV across to your recruiter, it is best to have your CV written in the third person - using the pronouns “I”, “me”, “my”, “mine”, “our” or “we” on your CV dampens the third-party ‘sell’ before you really need to. Try to think about your business case offering from the immediately observable and third-party perspective, as you would be discussed by others before having interviewed. The recommended format: A line (or two) on your background A line (or two) line on what your current role includes A line (or two) on what you are looking for – (framed from your reason for leaving) CANDIDATE: [NAME] LOCATION: London RIGHT TO WORK: UK Citizen QUALIFICATIONS: Qualified Solicitor of England & Wales (2014) AVAILABILITY: 3 Months (negotiable) SYNOPSIS: [Name] is a high calibre Employment Lawyer, approaching 5 years PQE with the leading International firm [firm name]. [Name] has an excellent academic record and has obtained a broad range of Employment experience to date, covering a range of contentious and non-contentious matters. Although [name] is progressing well with their firm, [name] is selectively considering firms which would offer them a step up and develop their skills and knowledge further. 3. Work experience: bullet-point what you did. This section should be in bullet-points for ease of accessibility, similar to the format you would ordinarily see in job specifications, as they are an easy way for employers and legal hiring professionals to get a quick snapshot of your experience to date. This section should not detail what your team did. Bullet pointing what ‘you’ did means focusing on your own actions and achievements. If you need to anonymise client names when detailing your work experience that is absolutely fine - for example, if you worked with HSBC you could simply say you worked with a 'leading high street bank'. Key information includes the documents you used, a value of the matter (if appropriate) and most importantly, what YOU did on that specific matter. Did you have a high level of client contact and responsibility? Showcase this. In instances where a collaborative effort was made, the key focus should be on your personal contribution to the wider effort. In bullet pointing what you ‘did’, it is important to realise what can and cannot be demonstrated on a CV. Steer away from an emphasis on what you ‘learned’, ‘developed’ or ‘demonstrated’, which are not only difficult to bring to life on a CV credibly, but are also more relevant at the interview stage. Keep the content to the job you performed, responsibilities fulfilled and value-added. What you should include is also dependent on your level of experience. If you are a junior Associate, keep your training contract experience on your CV as this is still relevant experience. As you progress through your career and become more senior, you can start to minimize this part of your experience and replace it with your post-qualification experience. Other general points for this section: Keep it chronological, in descending order of recency. Include the location (city) where each position was held. Consider omitting roles held prior to your beginning your formal qualification. 4. Education and qualifications: less can be more. In the legal market, employers are generally just not that interested in the finer details of your education. Key things to include in the education section of your CV are: When you were admitted as a solicitor and in which jurisdiction Grades for LPC and GDL (if appropriate) Grade for your degree A-Level subjects and grades Places of study Any awards/scholarships EDUCATION AND QUALIFICATIONS: 2014 BPP Law School, Holborn Legal Practice Course, Commendation 2013 University of Law, Bloomsbury Graduate Diploma in Law, Commendation 2012 University of Bristol Law LLB – 1st Class Honours 2009 [Sixth Form College] - A-Levels English (A) Mathematics (A) History (B) 5. The application: tailor your CV before applying. No one job or company is the same, so make sure that your legal CV is tailored to the position and firm that you are applying to, whether is this is a US Firm, Magic Circle, Silver Circle, or a boutique firm. Use the synopsis to highlight the main reasons you would be suitable for the position, and try to echo the organisation's corporate values and what the job specification says they are looking for throughout your application. In summary, your legal CV will set the groundwork for the remainder of the selection process. So, at the very least, it is worth considering how the synopsis might be tailored for each application you make. The take-home points here for general formatting purposes would be to let your career speak for itself with a simple layout, to omit any usage of the first person and to see the value in being recommended forward specifically by a trusted intermediary. Looking for advice on tailoring your CV, options in your search, or have a request for our next blog? Contact Tamara Salem on 020 7269 6368 or tamara.salem@pro-legal.co.uk.

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What Responsibilities Does a Legal Partner Have?

Progressing from Associate to Partner is the pinnacle of many lawyers' careers, and is a significant leap that comes with a number of responsibilities. Becoming a Legal Partner takes commitment and years of hard work, and understanding the extra responsibilities that come with Partnership will help you decide whether it is the right path for you. 1. Duty and commitment to other Partners The most important of all the responsibilities a Legal Partner has is their duty to the other Partners in their firm. You will be placed in a position of trust and it is a mutual understanding that each Partner must act with the utmost good faith and professionalism. When you reach this level in your career, it means more than simply signing an employment contract and going about your daily work - you have a greater level of responsibility and affinity to your firm as a whole and you need to ensure you are a true ambassador of the firm both internally and externally. 2. Change in workload You will find that once you reach Partner level your responsibilities in workload will also change rather significantly. Workload differs to that of an Associate in that you have a greater level of responsibility for the business as a whole, which means that you need to know what's going on at all levels. Rather than simply looking after your own personal work on a daily basis, you will oversee the work of your employees and if you are Partner at a large firm you may also have responsibility for different offices nationwide. You will not only be involved with internal matters but you will also be responsible for corresponding with external parties and other industry professionals. Business development will also come into your remit, and you will spend time in meetings with potential clients and business partners, meaning more travel and potentially extended hours. 3. Communicating with employees The transition from Associate to Partner in terms of relationships with your colleagues can potentially be a tricky one. The relationship you have with colleagues at Associate level is generally more casual as you are all on an equal footing, but this is likely to change when you become Partner. Part of Partnership is leading by example, and you will find that in some instances you will need to listen to employee issues, conduct interviews, deliver disciplinary actions, or even dismiss people - you may need to establish a different way of communicating with colleagues and employees in cases such as these. 4. Enhancing your business Part of being Partner is enhancing the company as a whole. As mentioned previously, you will be involved in business development and be involved in developing strategies to attract new clients, new employees and widen your business' reach. You will also need to keep up-to-date with industry news and political, economic, or wider developments that may affect the legal sector, and in turn, your firm. As a Partner, you will also have a hand in deciding how your company is portrayed and viewed externally, which will involve having a say in advertising campaigns, brand presence, measures for employee attraction or involvement in events. 5. Damage control Dealing with issues or complaints effectively in-house is an incredibly important part of a Partner's role. Unfortunately, mistakes can be made and complaints from clients or associates happen, but dealing with them in an efficient manner will ensure that such issues are not escalated to legal bodies or in a way that would be damaging to your firms' reputation. There are various responsibilities that come with Partnership, and the breadth and remit of your role will change significantly with this leap forward in your career. If Partnership is the right path for you , these are responsibilities that you will have been working towards and preparing for, and becoming Partner is undoubtedly a great step in your legal career. For more information on this article, contact Aaron Burton on 020 7269 6350 or aaron.burton@pro-legal.co.uk.

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Charity Times - 26/11/2019

FUNDRAISING Cancer charity increases donations by online payments overhaul Online donation income at Prostate Cancer UK has risen by a third after an overhaul of the charity's digital giving and payment system. The upgraded system now being used has an enhanced focus on digital wallet options, which are being increasingly used by supporters. The digital giving and payments system has also been integrated with other digital systems being used by the charity to create the potential for customised “online journeys” for specific appeals. Sadie Crabtree, head of digital at Prostate Cancer UK, said: “Data from other fundraising tools showed that a lot of our supporters prefer secure digital payments rather than typing in their card details when the option is available. Our improved donation journey lets them do that, and they’re giving more, so it’s fantastic to see the response.” Separately, UKFundraising takes a look at four ways that companies can use contactless giving at Christmas to benefit some of the UK’s smaller charities. Charity Digital News UKFundraising Millionaires and charities ‘lack faith’ A “lack of faith” between charities and high net worth individuals (HNWIs) means charities are missing out on £46.4bn, according to a new report, Barriers to Giving 2020. The report highlights a "lack of understanding and poor communication" between charities and many of the UK's wealthiest people, and said the additional billions could be created for charities if every multi-millionaire in the UK increased donations to 1% of their total income. Barclays Private Bank, which compiled the figures in the report, in partnership with The Beacon Collaborative and the Institute of Fundraising (IoF), aims to bridge this gap. Peter Lewis, chief executive of the IoF, which will work to deliver a series of events to help fundraisers engage and form long-term relationships with wealthy individuals, said: “We’re delighted to be bringing the findings of Barriers to Giving 2020 to life for the hundreds of charities we support . . . At the same time, there is a need to help HNWIs better understand charities and the impact we know is achieved.” Charity Times CharityCheckout reduces platform fee to zero Fundraising platform CharityCheckout has removed its 5% platform fee on donations and is instead asking donors if they wish to make an additional voluntary contribution to support its function. CharityCheckout founder and CEO Chester Mojay-Sinclare said that the move “will result in huge savings for our charity clients.” Simon Franklin, operations manager of charity Dig Deep, which uses CharityCheckout for online fundraising, concurred. He says: “Saving 5% on every donation is very important to Dig Deep. We anticipate annual savings of £25,000 which will contribute significantly to improving access to clean water and sanitation in rural Kenya.” UKFundraising Pilot platform for feedback on funders A pilot platform that allows fundraisers to anonymously share their experience of applying to trusts and foundations has now published more than 100 reviews. GrantAdvisor started in the US, and the pilot of a UK version of the platform has seen fifteen foundations opt-in, including big national funders including the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, Paul Hamlyn Foundation and Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales, and specialist funders such as the Joffe Charitable Trust and Jerwood Arts. UKFundraising Using TikTok to engage young audiences Charity Digital News takes a look at how charities can use social media platform TikTok to raise awareness and engage audiences. The platform's ‘TikTok For Good’ initiative sees nonprofits, charities and NGOs engage the typically youthful user base with ‘Hashtag Challenges’ whereby users create their own content to show support for campaigns. Meanwhile, UKFundraising takes a look at the new Facebook fundraising tools that have been unveiled in the run-up to Christmas, including Fundraiser Stickers in Facebook Stories, Charity Livestreaming, and Instagram donate button on business account profiles. Charity Digital News UKFundraising Social investment market value grows by 30% The social investment market in the UK has grown by 30% in the last year and is now worth over £3.5bn, according to the latest estimate by Big Society Capital. Jeremy Rogers, chief investment officer, Big Society Capital, said: “The market’s impressive growth is being driven in part by increasing awareness of and confidence in taking on investment by social enterprises and charities. We have also seen growing interest in investing with purpose, which has prompted fund managers to create new and innovative products. This increase in products and capital has created more options for both investees and investors – helping capital to flow where it is most needed.” UKFundraising The Sun launches fund for small local charities A new £1m Sun Readers Fund will see £1m given away to smaller local charities over the coming year. The fund celebrates the newspaper’s 50th birthday. Donations will be made to small charities in six categories: Children and Young People, Health and Wellbeing, Veterans, Animals and the Environment, Emergency Heroes, and International Aid. UKFundraising COMMUNICATION Charity apologises for tweets about Conservative manifesto The National Autistic Society has apologised and deleted a series of tweets responding to the publication of the Conservative Party election manifesto. Some members argued that the comments endorsed Conservative policies. An open letter organised by Janine Booth, a member of the charity and a campaigner and trainer on autism rights who Civil Society notes is also a Labour Party campaigner, claimed that the tweets represented “unacceptable bias” and continued: “You have not only breached the responsibility of charities to not endorse, or seem to endorse, a political party, you have also deeply hurt and damaged the trust of many autistic people who have been harmed by Conservative policies whose interests you claim to serve.” Jane Harris, the director of external affairs at the National Autistic Society, said that a particular tweet aimed "to give our supporters more information about what was positive in this manifesto for autistic people and what wasn’t as good. Even though we have been tweeting about all the manifestos, we hadn’t given the same detail for all of them. This wasn’t right and we are very sorry for this mistake." Civil Society The top charity CEOs on social media Polly Neate, chief executive of Shelter, was named the top charity leader on social media at the Social CEO Awards in London last week. Other winners included Girish Manon of ActionAid UK, Tracey Bleakley of Hospice UK, Javed Khan of Barnardo’s and Mark Russell of The Children’s Society. Digital expert Matt Collins, who co-founded the event, said: "Our winners show how charities of all sizes, causes and budgets can champion excellence in digital. Leaders need to set the tone from the top by continuing to invest and grow their skills. This will help their teams and their charities go from strength to strength.” Charity Times STRATEGY Productivity challenges are an issue for most charity decision-makers A new study suggests that 87% of decision-makers in mid-sized charities find productivity a challenge that affects employees, fundraising, and the quality of service for beneficiaries. The research from the Access Group found that 84% of decision-makers in mid-sized charities think improving productivity would have a big impact on their organisation, and 82% believe an improvement would lead to a better quality of service for beneficiaries. Simon Baines, managing director of The Access Group’s not-for-profit software and service division, observed: “There is clear appetite for greater productivity . . . [and] There is a call to action in the findings of this report, particularly in terms of reviewing and assessing where effective changes can be made across an organisation and the positive impact this can have on its culture, its people and ultimately frontline services and beneficiaries.” UKFundraising VOLUNTEERING Ericsson wants to match its employees with charities Ericsson wants to match over 300 employees with charities that need skills-based volunteers. The telecommunications company's ‘Our Year of Volunteering’ in 2020 will see approximately 40-50 charities with whatCharity.com profiles presented to Ericsson staff. Tiia Sammallathi from whatCharity.com said: “This is a great opportunity for charities of all size and type to benefit from much needed and highly sought after expertise from a wide range of professional skill-sets. It is a democratic and fair process facilitated by our platform technology. Like our previous applications for grants and competitions, the process is simple and straightforward.” Roger Peacock, HR director at Ericsson, said: “During 2020 we’d like to encourage more staff to take part and create stronger links with charities that may benefit from our staff’s time and skills by making it easy for both parties to engage." Charity Today CAMPAIGNS Initiative looks to tackle lack of female representation Women in Sport has launched online research designed to transform the culture of sports workplaces and tackle the under-representation of women at an executive level. The UK based sport and equality charity said: “We believe that women should not only be on boards but also part of an inclusive workplace culture that encourages female leadership and embraces diversity and inclusion.” Women in Sport research shows that 38% of women working in sport have experienced discrimination in the workplace, 40% felt undervalued, and just 46% felt there was a fair and equal treatment of men and women in their organisation. This comes in the week a Telegraph investigation into ten international sports federations found that none had 40% female boards and only three had 25%. The Daily Telegraph OTHER £400m unclaimed on Transport for London Oyster cards The amount left unclaimed on Transport for London (TfL) Oyster cards has soared after the launch of contactless payments. There is £190.6m in unclaimed pay-as-you-go balances and £196.7m in unclaimed deposits, says TfL. Oyster card credit doesn't expire and people can apply for a refund whether the card is registered or not. TfL said it regularly publicises information about how to do so via posters, the Metro newspaper's travel page, the TfL website and via social media. Oyster cards can also be donated at charity boxes at Heathrow Airport, King's Cross and Liverpool Street, which since 2009 have raised £218k for the Railway Children charity. Shashi Verma, TfL's Chief Technology Officer, said, "We're committed to ensuring that our customers can get back the credit on their Oyster cards if that is what they want. This is why we regularly publish the amount of credit on cards and how people can obtain a refund if they wish." Financial Times BBC News ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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The Perfect Tax CV

Creating the ideal CV can be a tricky task, but the perfect Tax CV is the very first step towards your dream job. To avoid your CV being dismissed and missing out on that all-important job interview, there are things you need to consider, and our specialist tax recruiters have provided all the information you need to create that perfect CV! Unlike ticking the ‘open to opportunities’ box on LinkedIn, submitting your CV symbolises an active interest in a role. Best to avoid the mentality of “just send my CV and see what they come back with”. If the role is worth applying for at all, then this is presumably worth doing with your best foot forward. A specialist tax recruiter will likely see over 100 CVs each week. With both your experience and motivations in mind, they should be able to consult on: (1) the common mistakes to avoid and (2) how best to tailor your CV and exhibit your strengths. The first matter is straightforward enough, forming the contents of general advice here: General formatting: keep it simple The executive summary: lose the fluff Work experience: bullet point what you did Education and Qualifications: less can be more The second question of how to tailor your CV is difficult to advise on here, given this will depend on your experience to date in relation to the role sought. So, while stressing the importance of tailoring, we have provided a general step-by-step guide on how to format your CV in the candidate-scarce and technically-niche tax market. Quick disclaimer: ‘the perfect CV’ does not reference a stereotypically perfect career as it may appear on paper, though exemplar excerpts have been included below for illustration. 1. General CV formatting: keep it simple. Your experience should speak for itself in a way that is easily comparable with other CVs. Send your CV to your recruiter in Word (not PDF) format and say goodbye to: Flashy fonts (keep it to black, Arial size 11) Convoluted layouts (stay away from using any kind of columns) Photographs Charts/images ranking your skills (e.g. ERPs, taxation areas & languages) Regarding length, a loose rule of thumb would be an additional page for every 5 years’ post qualified experience - assuming there has been at least one job change in this timeframe. This means at the recently qualified level, we’d be looking for no more than 1-2 pages; whereas for someone with 20 years post qualified experience, 5-6 pages would be reasonable. 2. The executive summary: lose the fluff. Within the first half-page, your CV should provide an overview of the most important details, including the cost and relevance of your candidacy: Your name City/town Right to work Relevant qualifications Notice period Current/sought salary Languages spoken (if pertinent to the role) Synopsis The synopsis is an important part of telling your story to third parties. However, promises of personal qualities are near impossible to make credible if written in the first-person. Recognise the benefits of having your CV written in the third person - using the pronouns “I”, “me”, “my”, “mine”, “our” or “we” on your CV dampens the third-party ‘sell’ before you really need to. Detach from your ego and try to think about your business case offering from the immediately observable and third-party perspective, as you would be discussed by others before having interviewed. The recommended format: One line on what (not who) you are A line (or two) on your background A line (or two) line on what your current role includes A line (or two) on what you are looking for – (framed from your reason for leaving) One line on how you come across in-person – (for your recruiter to add) CANDIDATE: [NAME] LOCATION: London RIGHT TO WORK: EU Citizen QUALIFICATIONS: CTA – 1st Time Passes ACA AVAILABILITY: 3 Months (negotiable) SALARY SOUGHT: £65,000 LANGUAGES: German (native standard) SYNOPSIS: [Name] is an impressive Tax Manager at [Big 4 practice]. Coming from a solid academic background, [name] brings an unusual array of breadth for their current level of seniority, having experience between business taxation, audit, VAT, international and employment taxes. Their current role is split equally between compliance oversight and advisory, with a client base dedicated to asset managers, hedge funds and banks. Following the completion of their recent secondment, [name] has realized their passion for the in-house context and is open to such opportunities offering a broad advisory focus and scope for development. In person, [name] is articulate, clearly bright, ambitious and comes attached with the recommendation of Pro-Tax for interview. 3. Work experience: bullet-point what you did. This is perhaps the only section which your recruiter will not be able to write for you. It is wise to always have an updated and readily available listing of the job you perform - even if this involves simply copying and pasting across responsibilities from your new job description to review and update later in your career. This section should be in bullet-points for ease of accessibility, similar to the format you would ordinarily see in job specifications. This section should not detail what your team did. Bullet pointing what ‘you’ did means focusing on your own actions/achievements. In instances where a collaborative effort was made, the focus should be on your personal contribution to the wider effort. In bullet pointing what you ‘did’, it is important to realise what can and cannot be demonstrated on a CV. Steer away from an emphasis what you ‘learned’, ‘developed’ or ‘demonstrated’, which are not only difficult to bring to life on a CV credibly, but are also more relevant at interview stage. Keep the content to the job you performed, responsibilities fulfilled and value-added. What you ‘did’ also means using the past tense. Action verbs – behavioural descriptions that end in “ed” – are a great way to frame these bullet points. For instance, consider the difference between “Managing” and “Managed”. The use of past tense here means that not only was this a responsibility which you may have upheld, but an achievement that you/your referee can stand by. Your CV will often need to get past a generalist finance researcher/HR professional before even being seen by a tax specialist. This person will be actively trying to find your CV using a database/LinkedIn Boolean search. The search terms will incorporate buzzwords from the person specification, such as “IFRS”, “CTA” or “partial exemption” for instance. Consider the buzzwords seen on the type of job specifications you are interested in and be sure to include those on your CV where applicable. Offering a rough percentage split for your responsibilities (i.e. the divide of compliance and advisory, and the areas of tax) can help non-specialists get a crude understanding for each role held. Other general points for this section: Keep it chronological, in descending order of recency Summarise the purpose of the role in the first bullet point, with the nuances from therein Format promotions/secondments under the same employment term where possible Include the location (city) where each position was held Consider omitting roles held prior to your beginning your formal qualification WORK EXPERIENCE: [COMPANY NAME], London (February 2012 – October 2019) Senior Tax Manager Advised on range of tax issues affecting the business; included tax strategy, compliance, risk and policy Responsible for a team of 10 including employment tax and indirect taxes VAT Led tax business partnering initiatives, working closely with Finance, Risk and Legal teams Led tax input to the sale of a key business division, including structuring to navigate complex tax regulations, due diligence and negotiation with the bidder Responsible for international tax aspects (including transfer pricing), in particular for businesses in the US and Ireland Led tax input to a M&A projects. Assessed tax risk, mitigated tax leakage and made recommendations to key stakeholders Provided tax advice on a major business restructuring. Minimised the need for external advice and secured HMRC’s agreement to our proposed tax treatment, achieving a tax neutral result Transformed key elements of the tax reporting processes and presented complex tax concepts and figures in a newly simplified, streamlined and comprehensible way that enabled better visibility of tax attributes and improved forecasting capability Major contributor to collaborative negotiations with HMRC on a historic tax return error; secured settlement and protected company from a potential large penalty​ 4. Education and qualifications: less can be more. In a niche and candidate-scarce market, employers are generally just not that interested in the finer details of your education. Their questions here will find dichotomous ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answers: “are they CTA qualified?”, “did they complete a degree?”, "were they educated in the UK?”. Design your education section accordingly: Focus on the credentials themselves Omit details on modules/percentages and possibly the subjects if below degree level The University may be worth a showcase, alongside any awards/scholarships Pair accounting/tax qualifications with the year of completion, noting 1st time passes Include if you are part-qualified with the anticipated year of completion. EDUCATION AND QUALIFICATIONS: 2015 CTA, 1st Time Passes 2015 ACA, 1st Time Passes 2013 University of Sheffield BSc (Hons), Economics – 1st Class Honours 5. The application: tailor your CV before applying. Recruiters who have relationships in place with Heads of Tax can quickly arrange interviews by relying on personal recommendations, rather than by tailoring CVs. However, the quick-win of being invited to a first-stage interview without tailoring your CV might not be the wisest approach. Invariably, your CV will frame the conversation at interview and from herein be presented to wider decision-makers (e.g. the CFO or Head of Investor Relations), with whom your recruiter just might not have the same relationship with. Your CV should not need to show much variation between each application, assuming your interests remain consistent and the scope of each role is similar. However, it is worth considering what small tweaks you might be necessary to appeal to each individual audience. For instance, while your CV may read “prepared complex memorandums and disclosed risks for income tax uncertainties”, the generalist HR/finance recruiter looking for “ASC740 or IFRIC23” as an essential criterion just might not recognise the relevance of your candidacy. Read the essential criteria on the specification and ask your recruiter: What do you think of my CV? (have they read it?) How might I be able to improve CV in relation to this role? (really… have they read it?) What are the criteria for CVs to be invited to interview? (do they know?) I am lacking the requirement of ‘x’ on the specification. Will your client be ok with this? Each of the essential person specification requirements should be encompassed by your CV (that is, if they can be demonstrated by a CV). Ironically, the candidate who gets the job often does not tick all the ‘essential’ criteria listed on paper; for the candidates who tick all these boxes typically have little scope for development in the role. So practically, your CV should exhibit most of the key requirements, with any glaringly obvious shortfalls acknowledged and accounted for. For instance, if you do not hold the required ‘experience of working within a multinational FS organisation’, think about your motivations and incorporate this into your synopsis as a reason for applying. In summary, your CV will set the groundwork for the remainder of the selection process. So, at the very least, it is worth considering how the synopsis might be tailored for each application you make. The take-home points here for general formatting purposes would be to let your career speak for itself with a simple layout, to omit any usage of the first person and to see the value in being recommended forward specifically by a trusted intermediary. After having met and asked you a few questions, the chances are your specialist recruiter will be happy to do the legwork and design your CV for you, excluding the work experience section. Looking for advice on tailoring your CV, options in your search, or have a request for our next blog? Contact Jay Sky on 020 7269 6343 or jay.sky@pro-tax.co.uk.

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60 Seconds With: Ken Chan, Head of Tax at TransferWise

Ken Chan is the Global Head of Tax at TransferWise, the international money transfer platform based on peer-to-peer technology. Launched in 2011, it is one of the UK's most successful global fin-tech startups, having raised substantial investments from a wide range of investors. Ken speaks with Jay Sky, Senior Consultant at Pro-Tax about life at TransferWise, the contrasting practice and in-house environments, and the upcoming challenges facing the next generation of tax professionals. What's great about working for TransferWise? I love the fact that everyone here is friendly but super-intelligent, and I'm grateful to be able to constantly learn from those around me. A particularly refreshing part is the focus and commitment to our mission to help our customers in everything that we do. This means coming into work every day to improve TransferWise, making our product cheaper, more convenient and faster for our 6 million customers worldwide. What advice would you want to give to anyone who would like to join your team? Given the autonomous nature of teams at TransferWise, anyone working in the tax team must be able to work well with the wider business. This means investing time to foster strong relationships and being able to focus on delivering impact. I'd also encourage potential candidates to ask themselves whether they are really ready to embrace the unknown. As a profession, I don't think this is something that we are particularly good at but it is increasingly important. There is plenty of support to help you succeed, but you need to be able to work within a certain level of uncertainty in order to thrive here. What’s your interview style? I think it's important to understand what makes the candidates tick - what's their story? How did they get here? Do they care about our customers? Solving real-life problems that the tax team is currently facing is always an interesting one. I'm not a big fan of contrived examples or academic questions. As stakeholder management is absolutely key, the rest of the interview process will always involve meeting people from other teams, for example, banking, product, and controllers. Given the nature of your role, you've obviously had to stay quite hot on predicting future trends. What do you think the next generation of tax professionals will face? The career decisions won't be dramatically different - work in practice or in-house, in a larger organisation or an SME. However, the skillsets will need to be much broader than being able to interpret the legislation - the next generation will need to be comfortable with source data, how to analyse these, figure out real-time reporting, manage public scrutiny and be ready for the constantly evolving tax landscape. The future stars are those who recognise that they need to be a commercial business partner - looking under the hood of the organisation, stepping back to feel the pulse of the business, and zooming even further out to consider what wider regulatory developments might mean for them. I hope to see a much more diverse population of graduates joining the tax profession. Whether they are more comfortable with data, the law, or finance, there is so much opportunity to build an interesting and fulfilling career in tax. Especially for our newly qualified readers, there will be a lot considering making the first step from practice into industry. Would you recommend an in-house career? Working in-house has its benefits, but think carefully before you do it - I understand working in practice isn't for everyone, but it is an exceptional training ground. You are surrounded by brilliant minds and experts in the tax profession, so don't jump ship just because of timesheets or a particularly demanding client! Talk to people and get a real sense of whether it suits you. What advice would you give yourself, at the start of your career? Treasure each and every opportunity - there is something you can learn from everyone that you come across. It's a journey that can take you in unexpected directions so take your time and learn. The Banking and Capital Markets Tax team at PwC was an undeniably brilliant training ground and I'm still very thankful for all those that helped me. Catlin, now part of the AXA group, showed me what an exceptionally strong tax team looks like - Matt, Janelle, Maggie and Claire continue to inspire me to build an equally commercial and pragmatic tax team at TransferWise. This is all in hindsight, and I wish I knew all of this at the time. So I’d imagine given your growth and how busy you must be, having your downtime is important. What do you do to unwind? How do you relax? At TransferWise, the focus is on spending time wisely to have the most impact on our customers, rather than face-time. So we're fortunate that well-being is an important part of the culture. The people I work with make my day go by, not to forget the office puppies, free breakfasts, team lunches, and the annual company-wide "summer days". Outside of work, my wife and I spend our time enjoying all that life has to offer, whether it's travelling, eating good food or just going for a walk and getting lost. For more information on this article, contact Jay Sky on 020 7269 6343 or jay.sky@pro-tax.co.uk.

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Charity Times - 19/11/2019

LEGAL Charity regulator is successful in first contempt of court case The Charity Commission has been successful in its first-ever application to the High Court for a finding of contempt of court. The court found in favour of the Commission’s application against two former trustees of the Darren Wright Foundation, a Bristol-based charity that raised funds to support the families of people with disabilities and life-limiting illnesses, ruling that Susan and Raymond Wright failed to comply with an order to supply evidence and documentation to the regulator. The Commission has powers to require individuals to provide information, and failure to do so may amount to contempt of court. It said: "The commission continues to investigate the charity over serious concerns about its management and governance. The commission stresses that its statutory inquiry into the Darren Wright Foundation is ongoing, and that it has made no findings yet. Another hearing is expected to determine the penalty against the two defendants ." Civil Society WiredGov GOV.UK Law Gazette Ex-charity chief admits to pension scheme fraud The former chief executive and chair of a disability charity has been prosecuted for defrauding its pension scheme of more than £250,000. Patrick McLarry admitted to taking funds from the pension scheme of Yateley Industries for the Disabled and using the monies to buy homes in France and Hampshire and paying off personal debt. The Pensions Regulator (TPR), which brought the prosecution, wants a confiscation order to “force” McLarry to return all of the money he siphoned from the pension scheme. The Charity Commission said: "We welcome the court’s decision to convict the former CEO of Yateley Industries for the Disabled Limited. The abuse of power for personal gain has no place in charity, and it is right that those who do so are held to account for their actions. We have worked closely with the Pensions Regulator to support their investigation and have engaged with the trustees’ over this incident . . . When a charity falls victim to fraud, more is lost than money. Fraud can have a hugely detrimental impact on morale in a charity, and on public trust, which is why we are working with charities to improve the sector’s defences against fraud." Civil Society Charity Times GOVERNANCE Charity regulator opens inquiry into Hospice Aid UK The Charity Commission has launched a new statutory inquiry into Hospice Aid UK. In 2014 the charity was the subject of a statutory inquiry, and during that inquiry the Commission issued the charity’s trustees with a formal action plan, which required them to carry out certain actions in order to improve the charity’s governance, to place it in a better financial position, and ensure its agreement with direct marketing agency, Euro DM, was transparent to the public. A recent review of the charity’s 2018 accounts has raised a number of concerns which has resulted in the opening of the new inquiry. Hospice Aid UK says it will make a formal complaint about the latest move by the regulator. The charity said the inquiry is based on inaccurate accounts submitted to the Commission by its previous auditors, which have now been corrected. Jo Gratze, chief executive of Hospice Aid UK, said: "There is a major fundraising event planned by HAUK for the end of this month and this inquiry will cause considerable distraction from and disruption to this, as well as damage to the charity’s reputation, at a time when it is preparing to increase charitable activities to support those most in need of its assistance." Civil Society GOV.UK Watchdog tells charities to detail Big Pharma cash The Charity Commission has told health charities to be "transparent" about money they receive from the world's largest drug companies to "protect their integrity". Tracy Howarth, head of regulatory compliance at the Charity Commission, said: "Patient charities have a unique and special role to play in providing both practical and emotional support to people that are suffering.” She added: "Because of this trusted position it is vital that their actions cannot be misinterpreted; where charities accept support from industry, they should be as transparent and open as possible in order to positively demonstrate their independence and protect their integrity." The Sunday Times GOVERNMENT Four demands for sector funding ahead of election The sector's umbrella bodies - ACEVO, CFG, Children England, the Institute of Fundraising, the Lloyds Bank Foundation, the Local Trust, NAVCA, NCVO and the Small Charities Coalition - have together released a manifesto ahead of next month's general election focused on strategic funding for charities. The key demands for political parties and the next government are to: increase funding for local authorities; establish a Resilient Communities Fund; confirm what arrangements will be made to replace EU funds in the event of Brexit; and use dormant assets to create a Community Wealth Fund. Civil Society FUNDRAISING Cancer Research UK named top charity brand of 2019 Cancer Research UK has retained the top spot in Third Sector’s annual Charity Brand Index despite causing controversy earlier this year with a series of adverts linking obesity to cancer. The charity was criticised over the summer for running a campaign that was perceived by some as fat-shaming. However, the report suggested that the negative impact on the brand has been limited. Cancer Research UK finished ahead of Macmillan Cancer Support, outscoring it on both consideration and awareness among the public. The British Heart Foundation came third in the list, with the RSPCA finishing fourth; the top five was completed by the Royal British Legion/Poppy Appeal. The older people’s charity Age UK was among the biggest climbers, moving up 18 places to number 10 in the list. Oxfam jumped 22 places to 35th on the list as it looked to get back on track after the safeguarding crisis that engulfed the charity last year, which contributed to it falling 27 places in 2018 to 57th place. Third Sector New blood cancer charity launches The Follicular Lymphoma Foundation is a new charity dedicated to helping people with the currently incurable blood cancer. The charity will fund research and support patients and their families affected by the disease. Dr Jessica Okosun, Clinical Senior Lecturer at Barts Cancer Institute and Consultant Haematologist at St Bartholomew’s Hospital and Scientific Advisor to the Foundation, said: “The amount of research funding into follicular lymphoma has comparatively decreased over time and, despite advances, the medical and research community still don’t understand follicular lymphoma as well as we would like, or well enough to have identified cures for all patients." Photographer Rankin has snapped the likes of Katherine Jenkins and Tracey Ullman for the charity's launch. UKFundraising Charity coalition appoints a new chair Remember a Charity has appointed Allan Freeman as its new chairman. He will be responsible for guiding the 200-strong charity coalition to meet its goal of making legacy giving a social norm. Freeman said: "Fundraising is becoming ever more challenging and yet the public’s willingness to leave a bequest continues to grow. Legacies have become the bedrock of financial stability for so many charities and are capable of changing the future of so many more." He added: “As it stands, there remains an intention gap between those who are open to the idea of leaving a gift in their will and those who actually do so, leaving a huge opportunity to further grow the donor market. I’m delighted to have the opportunity to chair the campaign at such an exciting time, as we draw closer to the tipping point when legacy giving will become a social norm.” Third Force News Charities focus on legacy giving fundraising activity More charities are expected to increase their focus on legacy giving fundraising activity in the light of predicted growth in such giving over the next five years. There will be an extra 26,000 bequests from wills by 2024, with an average value each of £25,000, according to a forecast by legacy donation analyst Legacy Foresight. Meg Abdy, Legacy Foresight's development director, noting that official death projections indicate that by 2024 there will be 3.1m deaths, compared to 3m predicted in their last projections two years ago, said: “In the short to medium term these new projections will boost charity income, especially among larger charities." Charity Digital News Dormant account money from building society goes to charity Community Foundation Tyne & Wear and Northumberland has received £1m from Newcastle Building Society under the ‘alternative’ dormant accounts scheme for smaller lenders. Newcastle Building Society CEO Andrew Haigh said: “The arrangements for managing dormant assets through the Reclaim Fund have enabled us to make a substantial addition to the Fund, which will further strengthen our ability to make a positive difference for the communities we serve.” FundraisingUK Online charity cards make a difference Charity Today takes a look at the fundraising potential from the sale of Personalised Greeting Cards and 3D E-Cards, with a particular on the free services provided by Making A Difference Cards. These reduce the risk of losing website visitors via page bounce and increase the opportunities for fundraising directly from a website without the burden of the development and associated running costs. Charity Today Giving Tuesday is nearly here Charity Digital News looks ahead to Giving Tuesday on December 3rd. Last year, charities raised over £7.8m in online donations on the day focused around encouraging people to remember their favourite charities and celebrate charitable giving. Charity Digital News CAMPAIGNS Festive campaign features young cancer survivors The CLIC Sargent Christmas appeal shows the "harsh reality" faced by children with cancer over the festive period, reports Third Force News. Adam Petrie, the charity’s associate brand director, said this year’s campaign hit harder than previous appeals. “What last year’s concept didn’t show was the harsh reality of what Christmas can be like for kids going through cancer treatment – not being at home to decorate the tree, having to put their stocking at the end of a hospital bed rather than their own, and eating Christmas dinner with your parents perched on the side of your bed on the ward," he said. Third Force News PEOPLE St Mungo's chief executive to step down Howard Sinclair, the chief executive of homelessness charity St Mungo's since 2014, will step down in autumn 2020 and take a "gap year" before embarking on his next role. St Mungo's is soon to commence work on its next five year organisational strategy, and Sinclair has said he wanted to “give as much notice as possible to enable the board to appoint a successor and ensure a smooth transition.” The charity said: “As is often usual with senior positions, recruiting a CEO can take some time. We will shortly be starting this process and it will be a competency-based recruitment, in line with our policies and procedures, led by members of the personnel and governance sub-committee of the board and the chair.” Civil Society OTHER Teacher breaks penny farthing record in charity ride A teacher from Matlock has raised £10,000 for Children in Need by riding a penny farthing bicycle he built himself from Land's End to John O'Groats, breaking a 132-year-old record in the process. Richard Thoday beat the old record by a full 14 hours. The Times BBC News ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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Legal Services Board Voices Concerns: SQE Still Has a Long Way to Go

The Legal Services Board has voiced concerns about the quality, cost and diversity impact of the Solicitor’s Qualifying Exam (SQE), which has been projected to come into play in 2021. Following concerns flagged by the super-regulator, it seems that the final sign-off on the SQE is not a done deal yet, and there is perhaps a long way to go before the new form of assessment is approved. Here at Pro-Legal, we previously shared an update on the Solicitor’s Qualifying Exam and how the legal training environment is changing. The Solicitors Regulation Authority have been consulting on reforms to the training of lawyers since 2015 and the introduction of the SQE, what the University of Law has called the ‘biggest shake-up in legal education in decades’, is set to change the way all solicitors qualify from 2021. A report by Chris Nichols, the Legal Services Board (LSB) Director of Regulation and Policy, says that various substantive issues were raised with the SRA’s first application for approval. Key issues raised by Nichols include the work experience section of the SQE, which according to the LSB, carries the risk of students “being treated poorly and getting limited utility from their time”. There have also been concerns raised regarding the quality of the proposed SQE, and Nichols had suggested there has been “an overall lack of any quality assurance of the process by the SRA”. The LSB has also requested an equality, diversity and inclusion impact assessment after concerns have been raised surrounding these issues, including questions like whether the exam will be provided in Welsh. The SRA will need to provide evidence that the SQE will not compromise equality and evaluate the impact the changes will have on the young legal professionals who will be going through the new exam and study structure. Dr. Helen Phillips, Chair of the LSB has stated that “the board is aware of the strength of feeling around the SRA’s introduction of the SQE, and we were pleased to have an opportunity to discuss the next steps for the process”. The LSB has agreed to send a non-exhaustive list of all their key issues and concerns to the SRA to be fully addressed in their next application for approval, which is expected to be submitted in July or August next year. The new route to qualification is still set to begin in the autumn of 2021, but it is undoubtedly clear that there is still more to do and issues to be addressed before the SRA gets the final sign off for the SQE. For more information on this article, contact David Bucknor on 020 7269 6332 or david.bucknor@pro-legal.co.uk.

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5 Ways You Can Benefit From Using A Boutique Tax Recruitment Agency

It can be difficult to know which tax recruiter to use when hiring or looking for your next role. You have an array of options that range from working with large organisations that operate internationally, through to partnering with a local specialist tax recruiter in London. There are, of course, pros and cons to each type of recruitment agency. Here at Pro-Tax, we have over 12 years specialising in tax recruitment - here are some of the advantages of using a specialist tax recruiter, whether you are looking for a job or you looking to hire a tax professional. ​ 1. Tax is what they do! As a professional: You are best placed to use a specialist tax recruiter as all of the Consultants are trained specifically in tax - they only work in tax and are not distracted by other specialist areas. As an organisation: You are safe in the knowledge that a boutique tax recruiter will channel all of their marketing budget into attracting tax professionals. You’ll find that larger finance recruiters, who manage their tax teams as a sub-sector, will focus spend on the more dominant areas of finance, as tax can be deemed as less valuable to the wider organisation. Overall, the knowledge, the database and the network of a specialist tax recruiter is far deeper than a generalist. 2. Personal touch As a professional: You know that the team you are talking to all know what they are doing. You have a team of dedicated tax recruiters all working with the best organisations to bring new jobs and opportunities to the table, therefore giving you access to the wider tax market. In larger firms, the sole tax specialist is very thinly spread and will struggle to cover all of the market. As an organisation: You can feel confident that you have a team of steadfast tax recruiters all searching for the best tax professionals to suit your opening. In larger firms, quite often you will find that the Managing Director pitches for the business which is then handed to a less experienced consultant to source the talent. When you work with a specialist tax recruiter, the consultant you liaise with will own the whole project to deliver the best possible outcomes. 3. Practical experience at every level Ordinarily, specialist tax recruiters are start-ups. The majority of the time they are owned by experienced recruiters who are good at what they do. They bring with them a wealth of expertise across extensive networks, as well as contacts and years of experience. This enables them to not only match the best talent with the best opportunities in the tax market but also train their teams with the best practice recruitment approach. 4. Flexibility and adaptability Because specialist tax recruiters tend to be smaller businesses, there is less red tape to adhere to. Obviously, they still adhere to codes of conduct. They can offer a bespoke recruitment service depending on what it is that you are looking for. So whether you’re looking for an In-House Tax Manager in commerce or a Tax Partner in practice, boutique recruiters can be flexible and make decisions quickly to tailor how they work with you. Pro-Tax is members of APSCO and each of our consultants are affiliated with the Institute of Recruitment Professionals (IRP). This means we are dedicated to maintaining and developing recruitment standards as well as continuously adapting to regulations in the recruitment landscape. 5. Partnership With specialist agencies, you are not just another business or person to add to our database. Smaller firms value every single organisation and professional they work with, and will partner with you to achieve your recruitment requirements. As a professional: Every person we register is so important to us. As a tax professional looking for a job, we know how much it means to search for the best opportunities and to take that leap into a new business. We pride ourselves on doing the right thing, we want you to recommend us to your friends and colleagues and if we don’t do a very good job, you won’t do that. As an organisation: At Pro-Tax, we don’t manage huge contractor projects with volume recruitment. Yes, we work with large business and global names across practice, industry, and the financial services, but all of these roles are unique and managed on a case-by-case basis. Every organisation we work with, we treat as a long-term partnership. Our goal is to help you achieve your goal in recruiting the best talent. For more information or to speak to our specialist tax recruiters about your recruiting needs as either a tax professional or an organisation, contact Alison Humphries on 020 7269 6312 or alison.humphries@pro-tax.co.uk.

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