Connecting to Linkedin

W1siziisimnvbxbpbgvkx3rozw1lx2fzc2v0cy9wcm8tz3jvdxavcg5nl2jhbm5lci1kzwzhdwx0lwjsb2cucg5nil1d

Blog

Charity Times - 16/04/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

GOVERNANCE

Garden Bridge fiasco risks undermining charities

The Garden Bridge project in London risks undermining public trust and confidence in charities, according to a report from the regulator. The Charity Commission said that the project to build a pedestrian bridge over the Thames, which was cancelled in 2017, was a "failure for charity." There was no evidence of mismanagement at the Garden Bridge Trust but the commission said the episode raised serious questions about how a newly created charity was given responsibility for spending a sum of £50m. “We have made clear to the trustees that the charity has not displayed the level of transparency and accountability that we would expect, given the nature and profile of its work,” said the report, which describes the project a “high profile and expensive failure”.

Charity Times Civil Society UKFundraising

Trustees removed after probe into cash couriering

The Charity Commission has dissolved Worldwide Ummah Aid (WUA), a charity which operated to relieve poverty in Eastern Europe and the Middle East, after charitable funds were found to have been misused, cash was taken overseas, and trustees used funds for personal expenses. WUA has been removed from the register and its charitable funds redistributed to another charity. Amy Spiller, Head of Investigations Team at the Charity Commission, said: "Charities hold a special status in society and trustees should be their careful custodians, ensuring all decisions are taken in the best interest of the charity’s mission and purpose . . . Through their misconduct and mismanagement the trustees jeopardised the trust that donors placed in those responsible for the charity. It’s therefore right that the Commission acted to disqualify the trustees responsible."

Accountancy Daily GOV.UK

Details of new Code of Fundraising Practice are revealed

The chief executive of the Fundraising Regulator has revealed details of the new Code of Fundraising Practice that is to come into force later this year. Gerald Oppenheim has said there was "broad support" in the consultation period last year for changing the code and it will be written in plainer English and include definitions of legalese to aid comprehension. The code, which is expected to come into effect in October, is also to be made more accessible online.

Civil Society

STRATEGY

Charities and government to create Youth Charter

Youth charities including The Scouts, The Prince’s Trust, UK Youth, Step up to Serve, Youth United Foundation, British Youth Council, Girlguiding, NCS Trust and National Youth Agency are partnering with the Department for Culture, Media and Sport to create a new Youth Charter to coordinate government youth policy. The charter seeks to centralise different youth services and offer young people the opportunity to raise concerns about societal issues. In a joint statement, the organisations said: “We are backing a new Youth Charter to put young people where they belong, at the top of the agenda. Through developing and delivering a cohesive approach to services for young people we can improve inequality and social mobility, generate positive outcomes that benefit wider socie ty, and unlock cost savings in health, criminal justice, and social care.”

Civil Society

New online guides for smaller charities

Inspiring Impact is a new website funded by the National Lottery and run by sector organisations that offers online guides and tools to help smaller charities measure the impact of their work. Joe Ferns, UK Funding Director at The National Lottery Community Fund, said: "More community organisations and charities will be able to better plan, measure and improve their impact with Inspiring Impact’s new website and tools,” adding "with the help of peer learning networks and free online resources, more and more communities across the UK can thrive.” More than 110,000 individuals have already used the resources.

Charity Digital News

FUNDRAISING

Tiltify launches to UK charities

Peer to peer fundraising platform Tiltify, which helps nonprofits raise money through livestream broadcasting activities, has launched to UK charities. WaterAid will use Tiltify for livestream campaign fundraising in campaigns and the platform is also working with Make-a-Wish UK, Cats Protection UK and The Diana Award. Tiltify chief executive Michael Wasserman says: “Tiltify allows anyone and everyone to reach new audiences from around the world and capitalise on the opportunity with easy-to-use features unique to our platform – like polling, rewards and milestones – that engage and motivate donors to open their wallets.”

UKFundraising

Big Issue Foundation accepts digital wallet donations

The Big Issue Foundation is now able to receive donations via digital wallet services such as Apple Pay and Google Pay following a partnership with Donr. Rhia Docherty, The Big Issue Foundation’s Individual Giving and Support Services Manager, said: “Donr’s Text Giving service is very effective, affordable and easy to use. This is also the first time we have been able to accept donation’s via digital wallet services like Apple Pay and Google Pay. Donr’s innovative platform will help us to future-proof donations in the digital age.”

UKFundraising Charity Times Charity Digital News

Awards celebrate nation of fundraising shopkeepers

The Daily Telegraph talks with Rufus Bazley, marketing director of BusinessesForSale, about the Small Business Big Heart Awards. Launched in 2016, the awards celebrate small businesses and the impact they can have on their local communities through charity work. Mr Bazley commissioned research which found that 72% of small businesses in the UK donate in some way to one or more good causes. Ninety-two per cent of those businesses supported small, local and independent community organisations.

The Daily Telegraph

VOLUNTEERS

Young people are keenest to volunteer

Under 25s volunteer more than older age groups, according to research from GoFundMe . Two-fifths (41%) of people aged 16-24 volunteer twice a month – but only one-fifth (19%) of other age groups volunteered time to help charities or good causes in their communities. Meanwhile, three-fifths (61%) of people over the age of 55 said that they never volunteered time; only a quarter (25%) of those under 25 said likewise.

UKFundraising

RISK

Cybersecurity grants for charities in Scotland

Charities in Scotland are being invited to bid for grants of up to £1,000 to invest in cybersecurity. The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations is making the money available to help charities achieve accreditation in the nationally recognised Cyber Essentials scheme. The deadline for applications is 5pm, Friday April 26th.

Charity Digital News

CAMPAIGNS

Scottish Government’s approach to mental health is lacking, charities say

Scottish ministers are failing to do enough to tackle the growing mental health crisis in schools, campaigners have warned. Leading charities said the Scottish Government was too focused on the treatment of pupils once they had developed mental health issues. Instead, they want a greater focus on teaching pupils the skills they need to cope with stress. The Mental Health Foundation and Barnado's say personal and social education (PSE) should be placed at the heart of the school curriculum. Kirsten Hogg from Barnardo’s said health and mental wellbeing of pupils remained the "poor relation" to literacy and numeracy, and the focus on counselling “runs the risk of medicalising pupil experiences."

The Herald

Charity calls for non means-tested legal aid funding for inquests into state-related deaths

The Ministry of Justice spent £4.2m representing prison officers at inquests, while paying out only £92,000 in legal aid for bereaved families at hearings that examine deaths in prison, according to figures released by Inquest. The charity, which supports families in coroner’s courts, is calling for automatic, non means-tested legal aid funding to families to pay for specialist legal representation immediately after a state-related death. Rebecca Roberts, Inquest’s head of policy, said: “Inquests following state-related deaths are intended to seek the truth and expose unsafe practices. Yet bereaved families are facing well-funded legal teams defending the interests and reputations of state and corporate bodies, who work together to shut down or narrow lines of enquiry.”

The Guardian The Times

Scheme aims to help the vulnerable stay safe

The Keep Safe initiative, a partnership between Police Scotland and charity I Am Me, has been launched in Moray. The initiative aims to help ensure that disabled and vulnerable people feel more safe when out and about in their communities. The scheme will see networks of local shops, businesses and organisations set up, providing Keep Safe places for disabled, elderly and vulnerable people to go to if they are lost, scared, need help, or if they are the victim of a crime. Keep Safe has been successfully launched in a number of other local authority areas, with more than 250 participating premises across Scotland.

Aberdeen Press and Journal


Back to Charity Times archive >>

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdqvmtyvmtuvndqvntkvotmzl0noyxjpdhkgveltzxmglsbqcm8tumvjcnvpdg1lbnqgr3jvdxaucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci1mzb4ndawiyjdxq

INSIGHT STRAIGHT TO YOUR INBOX

Subscribe to sector specific market updates, industry news and career guides here. Anchor

Form ID:1700

Click to Edit