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Newly qualified CTA: 5 Tips to Improve Your Job Search

Posted by Jay Sky

So, you’ve passed your CTA – congratulations! Whether it’s today, tomorrow or any working day onwards, at some point you'll be thinking about your current role, developmental goals and career aspirations. But from the newly qualified to the Head of Tax level, new challenges continually present themselves, not only in the nature of the role undertaken, but also in your efforts to get to the next step. So now you’ve got the CTA under your belt, here are our top tips to Anchorhelp direct your search and steer-clear of the common shortfalls.

1 -  Identify The Breadth Of Skills Needed For In-House Tax
2 - Consider The Best Time To Move In-House
3 - Timing: Plan Your Job Search And Start Date
4 - Don’t Focus Too Much On The CTA In-House Starting Salary
5 - Stay On Good Terms With Your Contacts In Practice

1 -  Identify The Breadth Of Skills Needed For In-House Tax

As covered by various senior figures in our “60 seconds with…” series, an increasing challenge for the in-house tax professional involves diversifying their taxation remit and upskilling with business-specific systems to partner more effectively with the business. Though factors such as the industry and team size you sit in will influence the areas you can get involved in, you just can’t go far wrong by pushing yourself to learn more. An interesting insight shared in a “60 seconds with…” (to be published in our next newsletter) explains that in light of increasing digitisation, AI tech, and automation, a challenge for the in-house tax consultant of tomorrow is to understand compliance & returns well enough to be able to advise adequately.

The breadth of skills you can bring to the table should especially be a consideration for those considering a move Anchorin-house from large professional practices. In a Big 4 Corporate Tax team for instance, your tax area will likely be specialised, but also rather narrow and siloed from other areas of tax. The balancing trick (and a challenge facing the future of the in-house tax professional), is to make the most of your specialism, while keeping your CV fluid enough to appeal to smaller teams and get involved in multiple areas of tax.

Bottom line: the importance of seeking a breadth of taxation skill, while staying true to your specialism and learning to partner with various business functions cannot be understated.


2 - Consider The Best Time To Move In-House

Tax is a candidate-scarce market at the junior level – capitalise upon this opportunity while you can.

The rhetoric often passed around in practice is to wait until at least Manager/Senior Manager before making the move in-house. The common suspects to justify this reasoning is that you will find a relative ‘lack of progression’ and ‘compliance-focused roles’ in-house at the junior level. However, what gets mentioned much less often is the benefit to your current firm, if you are to move in-house at a more senior level. That is to say, moving in-house once at Senior Manager level usually means you will have more discretion over outsourced spending, which ultimately benefits the partner’s pocket.

AnchorWith in-house searches, our clients looking for a Manager from the Big 4 are often flexible to seriously consider an Assistant Manager, or Senior Associate for the exact same post. The reason for this comes down to candidate-scarcity. There is a shortage of CTAs/ACAs. If you’re set on making the move in-house at some point, the candidate-scarcity at the newly qualified level provides you with a real opportunity to make a noticeable progression-jump, while still having the same developmental support and guidance systems in place for making that first transition in-house.
Making the first step in-house becomes much more difficult at the Senior Manager level upwards, for three interdependent reasons:
Once the business development responsibilities take hold at Senior Manager/Director level, will you want to walk away from this book of business and the relationships you have built? Would it not be better to gain in-house at the recently qualified level, and then perhaps return to practice as a Senior Manager, focusing on business development from there?

 - The pyramid hierarchy of most companies dictate less positions exist.
 - There are considerably more senior-level applicants than those at the more junior level.
​ - At the senior level, those already with in-house experience are invariably favoured.

Bottom line: If your heart lies with the move in-house, stay in practice long enough to get what you need from it, but not long enough to get too comfortable. You will have much more options ran past you at the Assistant Manager/Manager level, rather than at the Senior Manager/Director level, with the latter serving as a bottleneck for those who ultimately never make the move. If you get to Senior Manager level, it’s a good idea to get some in-house secondment experience under your belt.


3 - Timing: Plan Your Job Search And Start Date

The time when you decide to actually start looking at options in-house has a heavily understated influence on career progression. For the person who hasn’t planned ahead, the cues which prompt them into feeling ‘ready to look’ coincide with the markers they are actually ‘ready to move’. Here are the time-based factors which are overlooked: - The time of year. Things quieten down particularly in the holiday seasons. Are you confident that choosing to look in the summer, winter or Easter holidays will lead you to having enough options to look through? It might be the case you are on the market for a month before you find something suitable to even apply for. - The time spent on an interview process (or several processes). At the newly qualified level, we’ve placed candidates within a week, a fortnight and sometimes it can take a month or more, depending on the time of year and the process in question. - The length of your notice period. Surprisingly, this is the big one which nobody seems to plan ahead for. If you’re making the first move from practice and your notice period is project-status dependent, it might be the case that you’re able to negotiate your notice period way down a little – but be ready for this.

Together, you might be looking at around a 4-6-month gap from the point when you are ‘ready to look’ versus ready to ‘move’. Imagine you move just three times in the next 10 years, and each time fail to start looking 4-6-month months prior to when you feel ready to move. If in 10 years you are applying at the Head of Tax level, you’ll Anchorlikely be competing with a seemingly super-progressive candidate who have managed to progress through the ranks two years faster, due to no more merit than career planning alone.

Bottom line: Distinguish between ‘ready to look’ and ‘ready to move’, and plan for those delay months well in advance. Know the shelf-life for your role, and then minus your notice period from your time spent ‘looking’, alongside the time you anticipate needing to find the right role and progress through processes.


4 - Don’t Focus Too Much On The CTA In-House Starting Salary

Money will advance the cash in your pocket for today – but not necessarily your career for tomorrow.

Becoming a newly qualified CTA opens career doors, and it’s an exciting time to see the options available to you jump in salary banding. Take this bluntly from a recruiter: I am rewarded as a proportion of your remuneration, and so it wouldn’t make sense for me to advise that you settle for anything less than the market rate. But even in the financial services markets (where the remuneration is usually higher than other in-house roles), too many just fall into the honeytrap of prioritising monetary gain in the short-term, and often at the cost of longer-term limitations.

Negotiating a high salary at the newly qualified level might not help your incremental gains later. We’re in an age of gender pay-gap disputes and equality acts, and so there is a decreasing emphasis incremental pay-raises (e.g. the old-fashioned thinking of 10% salary increases). The reasoning here is that basing new salaries on the old simply exacerbates existing pay inequalities (watch this space). The times are moving, and salaries are now becoming increasingly based on market-demand for the candidate skillset offering (and rightly so). In 10 years time, when youAnchor are applying at the Head of Tax level (where the salaries can really jump up) – you won’t be chosen because of your sky-high financial requirement. You’ll be chosen for your business-case offering and what skills you can bring to the table.

Bottom-line: speak to a recruiter you trust about the market-rate salary and know your bottom-line number for the right opportunity. From that starting point, try to prioritise everything non-salary related. If the role, company and career-route is right for you, the money will follow.


5 - Stay On Good Terms With Your Contacts In Practice

Life is a village… and in London, Financial Services tax is a very small village indeed

Tax is an incredibly small market and your effort to be nice to people should be twofold. Firstly, when you make the move in-house, make an active effort to stay on good terms with your contacts in practice. I’ve hired for some truly impressive heads of tax and have been repeatedly surprised to observe the differences in their ‘recruitability’, based on nothing other than reputation and contacts in practice. While one Global Head of Tax struggled to onboard anyone because they had a reputation for overworking their external advisors, the other would have a heap of support. I’m talking (free) Big 4 workshops, invites to key speaker events, ‘Heads of’ social gatherings and active contacts sending them transfer pricing juniors who were not looking, but came attached with glowing recommendations.

Second, be nice to those pesky recruiters who buzz your phone to the point of combustion. Yes, while it might get irritating being hit-up repeatedly by those who would like to greet your shiny new CTA qualification with the job specification you’ve seen umpteen times, make the effort to be nice. When we headhunt seniors at the Head of Tax level, they are always friendly – in part because they don’t get called with options all-too-often. In the recruitment industry, the turnover of staff is very high, and the likelihood is that 99.9% of the recruiters you speak to won’t be in this market in 10 years. However, it will be the .01% who really matter. It will be this recruiter who remembers names from past conversations the best, knows your entire network and will have an abundance of ‘Heads of’ contacts who they can choose to approach or not. It will be this recruiter who the CFO asks for their opinion on your candidacy and standing.

Bottom line: honour your commitments made to your network and be careful to protect your reputation. Your name in the industry says more than what you could write on a CV or job spec.


For further advice about your job search in financial services tax, or if looking to make a move in-house, contact  Jay Sky, Pro-Tax’s financial services recruitment specialist at jay.sky@pro-tax.co.uk or call 020 7269 6343

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