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Becca Ly

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Becca Ly

Group Marketing Manager

With over 10 years of experience within recruitment firms ranging from FTSE 250 companies through to niche sector specific service offerings. I now head up the marketing operations for Pro-Group, working closely with the leadership team to deliver UK wide marketing initiatives to drive brand recognition, customer loyalty and lead generation.

Originally from London, I moved to Cheshire for school and university, which included a year in Canada to complete my Marketing and International Communications Degree. After graduating, I moved back to London and into the wonderful world of recruitment.

Outside of work, I love to travel! I spend a lot of time exploring all of the wonders London has to offer. You’ll also find me taking random road trips around the UK in the weekends.

becca's articles

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10 Body Language Tips To Help You Succeed In Interview

Posted by Becca Ly

Everyone knows good interview preparation is key to succeeding in that first step to finding that new job. We all prepare for those tough interview questions to increase our chances of getting through to the next stage of the recruitment process. But how many of you focus on the importance of nonverbal communication? Research shows that when we communicate feelings and attitudes, only a small percentage of our overall message comes from the words we use: 55% of our message comes from body language (especially from movements of the small muscles around the eye which can convey shock, disbelief, doubt or disgust) 38% of our message comes from tone of voice Only 7% of our message is conveyed by the words we use (Mehrabian, 2007) Here are 10 body language tips to help you succeed in your interview: 1 - Walk the walk >> 2 - Sit up and back in your chair >> 3 - Look at their face, not constant eye contact >> 4 - Use your hands when speaking >> 5 - Keep your feet firmly grounded >> 6 - Breathe calmly >> 7 - Nod whilst you listen >> 8 - Lean in when speaking >> 9 - Mirror your interviewer >> 10 - Smile >> 1 - Walk the walk How you walk into an interview can speak volumes to an interviewer. To give an air of confidence, you should walk with pace (but not too fast or slow) with your head up and shoulders very slightly back. Be careful not to be too casual, you want to portray confidence, not arrogance! 2 - Sit up and back in your chair A good posture shows assertiveness and eagerness. Research shows that sitting at a slight angle, rather than straight on and directly facing them allows you to take in more of what the interviewer is saying and lessens the feel of intimidation and discomfort. 3 - Look at their face, not constant eye contact We use our eyes as a level of communication with other people. We also avoid a direct look from another person if we have something to hide. Maintaining a good level of eye contact in an interview portrays sincerity. However, to avoid constantly drilling into the interviewer's eyes, the most effective way to stay engaged is to look different parts of someone's face every two seconds, rotating from eyes, to nose, to lips. 4 - Use your hands when speaking Be careful not to cross your arms because that signals anger or a lack of openness. Your hands can be a very useful tool in an interview. They can help you emphasise key points; highlight your enthusiasm for a role, and show your belief and confidence in the points you are expressing. Open palms are often considered as signs of honesty and openness, traits that are very respectable to an interviewer but be careful not to use your hands too much as it can also be distracting. 5 - Keep your feet firmly grounded You may think that because you’re sat down in an interview, no one looks at your feet. But keeping both feet firmly to the ground generally shows a lot more confidence than having your legs cross. Sitting with both feet on the ground will also help you avoid any fidgeting which can be portrayed by the interviewer as nervousness. 6 - Breathe calmly Remember to speak clearly, confidently and at a good pace. Breathe. There’s an easy tendency to feel pressured to speed through your answers, but the best thing to do is listen to the question - pause - breathe - and deliver your response in a moderate speed and tone. This will help keep yourself calm as well as allowing your interviewer to take in your response. 7 - Nod whilst you listen Nod when you want to encourage and hear more, signal an understanding or when you are in agreeance with your interviewer. Be careful though, nodding too much loses its effect, as with anything you do too repetitively, you just start portraying yourself as unconfident and phony. 8 - Lean in when speaking Naturally, we all lean into a conversation when we’re passionate or engaged with the topic. Leaning in with your shoulders back and down demonstrates that you’re interested. With your posture being an important part of your non-verbal communication, this simple trick will help the interviewer see that you’re fully engaged. 9 - Mirror your interviewer By matching your interviewer’s positive body language, you can quickly get on good terms with them. Mirroring is a way to bond and to build understanding. It’is a very powerful body language tool that we use instinctively without even being aware of it. The most obvious forms of mirroring are yawning and smiling - let's hope the yawn doesn’t make an appearance! 10 - Smile You want to show you have a personality and you’re paying attention to what’s being said. However, many of us smile when nervous, so be mindful not to overdo it! You want to smile when you first meet the person and shake their hand when you talk about subjects you are passionate about and at the end of the interview while saying goodbye. Here are a few other blogs which will help you to prepare for your interview: How to handle interview questions like a pro >> Do you have any questions? >> Interviews - What not to do! >> 9 Rules for dressing for an interview >> For more interview tips or information about this article, speak to one of the team about your recruiting needs, contact us here!

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The 4 Pillars of Workplace Wellbeing - Recording

Posted by Becca Ly

Thanks to everyone who joined us on The 4 Pillars of Workplace Wellbeing Webinar. We received some great questions from you all, we didn't have enough time to respond to all of them, but look out for further articles from Claire Stradling, who will look to share further insight into Wellbeing in the Workplace. Keep the questions coming in, we'd love to hear about which topics you'd like us to explore going forward Share your thoughts >> If you missed it the webinar - you can view it here: If you would like a copy of the slides, they can be viewed HERE

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Let’s all #PressforProgress

Posted by Becca Ly

Progress requires pressure – it always has. And that’s the reason why days like International Women’s Day exist. How do we measure this progress? Big 4 firm, EY UK have a countdown clock on their website which suggests, at current rates of progress, we still have 216 years to go before achieving gender parity. And that is for women in the western world. If we count all women the number is sure to be much higher. This is why we need to #PressforProgress. For women everywhere, for their wellbeing, for their success. Pressing for change can take many forms: from social activism to being an advocate and champion for talented women in your workplace. Is there parity in the choices, opportunities, and rewards available? EY found that an organisation with 30% female leaders could add up to 6% to its net margin. They also found that companies with even one female Director outperform those with none. Women remain underrepresented on boards of directors and in the C-suite, despite evidence that companies with women Directors have better business outcomes. Alison Keogh, Board Director at Pro-Group mentions, “We’ve never looked into gender when selecting the best experts for our organisation and we’re proud to still have maintained an unintentional 50:50 male-female split for the third year running here. Gender should never be a deciding factor or hindrance when looking for the best talent, this is something we advocate for everyone we work with”. As an executive coach, I #pressforprogress through my work on leadership, diversity & inclusion and wellbeing, because they are linked. An effective leader learns how to create an inclusive environment for all their people, and realises that their wellbeing is not only essential for the bottom line but essential for each person they are responsible for. To enable them to thrive. If we all find our own way to #pressforprogress, for women, and in fact for all underrepresented groups, we really will be able to enact change. Guest writer - Heeral Gudka - Executive Coach

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Introducing Your Award Winning Tax Recruitment Firm

Posted by Becca Ly

On 6th December we headed down to the Park Plaza Hotel to attend an evening of black tie, champagne, entertainment and of course the awards ceremony that was long awaited for the Institute of Recruitment Professionals. Earlier in the year, Pro-Recruitment Group had submitted three nominations for Leader of the Year, Best Newcomer of the Year and Business Manager of the Year. All three nominations were reviewed and shortlisted. We had made the final, or so these three recruitment professionals had; Pat Keogh Ali Keogh George Tattnell We are delighted to announce that the night was a success and our Director of Pro-Tax Alison Keogh won the award for Business Manager of the Year. This is a huge success and something we are proud of at the Pro-Recruitment Group. There were over 100 entries and to be an award winner is a huge accolade for us. This came in the year that we were also celebrating being 10 years old as a firm. So, coming from 2007 and three people starting out a recruitment business to 2017 when we are nearly 60 people and winning awards was a great finish to our year.

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7 Steps To Getting A Promotion

Posted by Becca Ly

Do you think it’s time for your promotion? The thing to note about career progression is that you’ll need more than simply the correct experience. Knowing what else you need to address with your employer, as well as how to bring the issue up, can be the key to getting your desired outcome from the conversation. Here are 7 handy steps you can take to get the promotion you’re after. 1. Ask your employer The first thing to do is make sure you’ve stated your aspirations to your manager in clear terms. Set up a meeting with the appropriate authority to talk about your career, and the direction you’d like to take it in. Make clear how you see yourself progressing, and offer an ideal timeframe. Letting your employer know what your goals are may further incline them to move you up when the opportunity arises. An ideal conversation would also expose you to the opportunities currently available within your organisation. This should help you plan your next move. Generally, higher positions will involve greater freedom and autonomy, but also greater responsibility. You can’t go wrong by requesting greater responsibilities. Signalling a wish to do more important work should make your intentions clear in a non-obtrusive way. The old saying goes: ask and you shall receive. The first step, then, is to ask. 2. Sell yourself If asking alone got us the results we wanted, we would all be living out fully idealised lives. We need to do more than just ask – we need to display our credentials. Take notes of the work you’ve done to help your company reach its strategic goals. Keep these achievements in a log, and make them prominent during your meeting with your manager. Beware: stating that you simply deserve to be moved up is by itself not a good tactic. Showing why you’re an important asset to the company is better. Basically, you need to quantify your results. You might even show them some of your lesser-known accomplishments. Try to promote yourself in a way that also casts your colleagues in a better light. 3. Acquire additional skills Often, our current experience doesn’t cover the requirements for a promoted position. Some positions we would like may require additional qualifications or skills, required even for internal applicants. Find out what these requirements are and take matters into your own hand by acquiring them. Spending extra time to learn new things for a role we want is almost always worth it. If for some reason you miss the promotion, you’ll still have gained a new skill to add to your CV, which will help you if you choose to seek a new job. 4. Move sideways Instead of keeping your eyes on the role above you, try looking to the side. Sometimes a movement to a different division or a different role at your same level may be a more lucrative move. Not every promotion involves a direct movement upwards. This is especially useful in cases where someone directly above you is blocking your progression. Trying new responsibilities may even come with a pay rise or more flexible hours. You’ll gain new skills and expand your portfolio, which better equips you for when it’s time to move up. 5. Start asking questions Building a strong team allows managers to outsource expertise to their employees. As an employee, you should ask your questions to demonstrate your own value. There’s no creed that dictates employees must agree unequivocally with everything managers say. At times, it’s better to be inquisitive. But there has to be a balance: interested is not the same as irritating. Learn how to inquire with integrity, with the correct backup, and when to continue. 6. Realise your shortcomings It’s easy to take credit when things go well. Showing that you’re able to take blame when things go wrong, however, is a greater display of responsibility. It’s generally nicer to admit to your own failures and work on them, rather than hear about them from someone else. When things aren’t running smoothly, communicate this with your manager in a professional manner. The next step is to make clear how you’ll improve the situation, and show willingness to tackle it. Promotions are about accountability as well as pay rises. Prove your accountability and maturity, and the rewards will come. 7. Keep working hard Amidst all this, it’s important to keep a cool head and remain focused on the work you’ve been currently delegated. Taking time to consider greater goals and larger-scale projects is useful, but not at the expense of your day job! Promotions are rarely certain. If you struggle with your current work, you’ll have a harder time convincing those above you that you’re suited for more senior responsibilities. If you feel like you’re stuck in a position with no progression, Pro-Group can help you find better positions. Try searching through our vacancies. We have you covered.

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