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Charlotte Dunkerton

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Charlotte Dunkerton

Senior Consultant | HR

I have worked in recruitment for as long as I can remember and have worked for large high street agencies to the more boutique agencies, as well as running my own business. I know what it takes to get it right and enjoy nothing more than finding the perfect match for my candidates and clients. 
 

Over the years I have built up an amazing network of fantastic candidates who have become clients and clients that become candidates. Either way I believe I have always given 100% to the job at hand ensuring the recruitment experience with me is a positive and enjoyable one. 
 

I have met lots of great people over the years and continue to grow and establish my network and am proud to say that a high percentage of my work is built on referrals and recommendations.
 

I work primarily within the Charities & NFP sector placing at all levels of HR including HR Director, Head of HR, HR Manager, HRBP, HR Advisors as well as various roles within Reward.
 

Outside of work I enjoy going to the gym and generally keeping fit. I enjoy socialising with my friends, eating out and finding new places to explore. I love to travel and am a real sun worshiper so anywhere that’s hot with a beach, I’m there!

charlotte's latest roles

  • HR Advisor

    Up to £29650 per annum

    HR Advisor - Permanent Location - Surrey Salary £29650 Are you CIPD L5 minimum qualified (or equivalent)? Do you have operational and transactional HR experience? Are you looking for a fast past role with a ...

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  • Assistant Business Manager

    £400 - £450 per day + Inside IR35 umbrella

    Job Title: Assistant Business Manager 10mth FTC Location: London Salary: £400 - £450 day rate (inside IR35 Umbrella) 10mth FTC The Role: We are working with a Transportation company in search of an Assistant...

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  • HR Advisor

    Up to £40000.00 per annum

    Job HR Advisor - 6-9mth contract Location 3 days from the office and 2 days from home Salary c£40kpa pro rata We are working with a leading animal charity in search of a HR Advisor on a 6-9mth contract basis...

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  • Regional HR Manager

    Up to £55000.00 per annum

    Role Regional HR Manager Location Amman, Beirut or Istanbul Salary $6000pcm We are working with this International Humanitarian Charity in search of a Regional HR Manager to cover the Middle East region. Rep...

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  • HR Manager

    Up to £51700 per annum

    Role: HR Manager 12mth FTC Mat cover - Start mid-September. Location: Hybrid London & Home Salary: c£51500 We have an exciting opportunity for an experienced Operations International HR Manager to join this ...

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  • Employee Relations Coordinator

    £40000.00 - £45000.00 per annum

    Job Title Employee Relations Coordinator - Permanent role - Will look at interim in the short term. Location London Salary £40 - £45kpa Do you love Employee Relations? Do you want to work for a leading Human...

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  • Workforce Planner

    £400 - £450 per day + Inside IR35 umbrella

    Job Title: Workforce Planner 10mth FTC Location: London Salary: £400 - £450 day rate (inside IR35 Umbrella) 10mth FTC The Role: We are working with a Transportation company in search of a Workforce Planner w...

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  • HR Manager

    Up to £45000.00 per annum

    HR Manager London Permanent Up to £45kpa My client, a national Governing Body, is looking for a HR Manager on a permanent basis to lead a HR team of 1 x HRBP, 2 HR Advisor and 1 x HR Assistant. This is a fan...

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  • Head of HR

    £55000 - £60000 per annum

    Global Head of HR Hybrid Home/Office London City Permanent Paying up to £60kpa Our client, an international children charity, is looking for a Head of HR to lead and manage the HR function. With a team of 3 ...

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What people say about Charlotte

Charlotte is an outstanding personality and very talented at finding outstanding candidates for the right client.

I was a candidate and client with Charlotte and the service was fantastic. Charlotte really understands how to build and maintain long term relationships.

Charlotte was a pleasure to liaise with, Charlotte expedited my appointment and kept everything on track, with great communication.

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Companies Charlotte has worked with

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The Salvation Army is a Christian church and an international charitable organisation. The organisation reports a worldwide membership of over 1.7 million, consisting of soldiers, officers and adherents collectively known as Salvationists

The Wellcome Trust is a charitable foundation focused on health research based in London, in the United Kingdom. It was established in 1936 with legacies from the pharmaceutical magnate Henry Wellcome to fund research to improve human and animal health. 

mytimeactive - passionate about wellbeing – about people living longer, healthier and happier lives.

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charlotte's articles

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Too Hot to Work?

Posted by Charlotte Dunkerton

Every year we get periods of extreme temperatures.  Although 2021 is not a ‘normal’ year as far as workplaces are concerned, an employer has the same obligations towards staff welfare. The question all employers should be considering (and employees will be asking) is: Is it too hot to work? So, we have to consider whether there is a maximum working temperature.  This being a temperature above which it is not acceptable for employers to expect employees to work (and employees should expect to have to work in). As usual, I head straight for the legislation which, as you would expect, differs depending on whether you are in Great Britain or Northern Ireland: The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 in Great Britain, and The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1993 However, in both pieces of legislation, it is Regulation 7 that says: During working hours, the temperature in all workplaces inside buildings shall be reasonable. So, what does reasonable actually mean?  The next step is to look at the guidance on this legislation, found in the relevant Approved Codes of Practice on the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and Health and Safety Executive (Northern Ireland) (HSENI) Websites.  Whilst the Websites may be different, the guidance is the same:  ‘The temperature in a workplace should normally be at least 16 degrees Celsius. If work involves rigorous physical effort, the temperature should be at least 13 degrees Celsius’ In short, the legislation in Great Britain and Northern Ireland only covers minimum working temperatures.   However, the above guidelines then point to the HSE Website that describes ‘thermal comfort’.  This is defined as ‘a person’s state of mind in terms of whether they feel too hot or too cold’.  It used to say that an accepted zone of thermal comfort for most people in the UK lies between 13°C (56°F) and 30°C (86°F), with acceptable temperatures for more strenuous work activities concentrated towards the bottom end of the range, and more sedentary activities towards the higher end.  Now, more emphasis seems to be on the employer’s responsibility for managing thermal comfort, as per the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 and 2000 Northern Ireland equivalent.  So, in light of the obligations under these Regulations, I thought I would point employers to some guidance, particularly relevant at this time – note that thermal comfort is the same UK-wide, so the links to the HSE Website in Great Britain apply equally in Northern Ireland: What is thermal comfort? What are the six factors of determining thermal comfort? Measuring thermal comfort Controlling thermal comfort On the last link, look at eth bottom for the handy ‘Thermal Comfort Checklist’ that can be downloaded in order to carry out thermal comfort risk assessments.  Also note that the Management Regulations apply to some self-employed – so, employers should think of their responsibility as being to workers rather than just employees. It is really important that employers are aware of thermal comfort and consult with employees or their representatives to establish ways of coping with high temperatures.  After all, failure to do so is against the Management Regulations.  This article is written by Ian Holloway, a highly respected payroll practitioner, writer, advisor and trainer at i-Realise. Ian has worked in the payroll profession for over 30 years.  He has developed exceptional 360-degree insight into payroll’s challenges and the impact of relevant legislation – having worked for both in-house payroll teams, software providers and as a payroll lecturer, writer and government advisor. ​For more information on this article or to speak to our specialist recruitment consultants about your next HR role in the charity sector, contact Charlotte Dunkerton on 020 7269 6342 or charlotte.dunkerton@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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Working From Home: Benefits to an Employer

Posted by Charlotte Dunkerton

With working patterns being disrupted, ‘the norm’ is looking very different to how it was 18 months ago. As the UK slowly eases back into the new realities of work, it’s an interesting time to explore the reason why remote working not only benefits the employee but widely has a beneficial impact for many organisations and employers. I recently surveyed my Linkedin contacts to discover their perceptions of workload whilst working from home: With 80% saying they felt they worked harder from home, as the effects of reducing the office culture are clearly taking a toll, with some of the conversations I have had including the issues below: 1 Blurred Lines between work and home life Burnout is real. It is a state of emotional, physical, and mental exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress. It occurs when you feel overwhelmed, emotionally drained, and unable to meet constant demands. It’s important to be wary of this and ensure your teams realise when it is time to just switch off from work. 2 Lack of Social Contact This can be an issue if you work from home alone, without other people around the employee, be it housemates or family. It’s key to ensure that you as an employer are understanding of this situation and offer ways to support social interaction, be it through virtual team meetings to help map out the day or week of work, regular conversations over the phone or even face to face catch ups when restrictions permit. 3. Lack of Resources Do your teams have the tools and resources they need to fulfil their roles day-to-day? If you plan on switching to a hybrid model whereby your team is expected to work from home in the week, it’s essential they have the tech resources they need to complete their work. Do they need that second screen? DO they have sufficient tech tools? A review with your employees should help you distinguish what they need to support them when working from home. However, there are clearly benefits to your business which are, but not restricted to: 1 Productivity Working in the office can sometimes be distracting, busy and loud. which can lead to a lack of productivity and concentration issues for some of your employees. Employees working from home also benefit from the extra time in the morning avoiding their commute and being able to start the day fresh without the hassle of public transport. If employees are on-boarded with the right skills of how to work from home, then they are likely to be very efficient and productive. We at Pro have seen a huge uplift in productivity whilst we continue to review and ensure we provide our teams with the tools they need to succeed. 2 Improved Employee Retention and Attraction Even if an employee’s personal circumstances change, being address, Covid restrictions and self-isolation, working from home allow your employees to still focus and carry out their duties whilst working wherever they feel most comfortable. Being flexible in remote working opportunities is a great way for employers to retain staff, reduce employee turnover and ultimately save money on hiring in the long-term.  Remote working in the UK has shown to statistically be favoured by employees, being one of the most important company benefits for 19% of employees, who say that if they were torn between two roles, 1 in 5 individuals would accept the remote working jobs over office-based jobs. 3 Financial Benefits Fewer overheads, less need for costs in the office such as kitchen facilities, furniture or utilities. Without completely eliminating all costs, remote working can offer a reduction in the cost for the less necessary resources and allow you as an employer to focus on providing better tools and advance your technologies. 4 Improved Employee Wellbeing Having a flexible schedule can be beneficial to your employees for many reasons, including reducing stress and increasing happiness. Those who have children are able to take them to school or even have the evening meal with them, others who live further away from the office are able to benefit from the extra time and money saved in their commutes.  Mental health is currently the leading cause of sickness absence from work and costs the UK employers an average of £1300 per employee. Taking time off from work, or having the flexibility to work remotely is a great way to boost the work/life balance for employees which will lead to better mental well-being in the workplace. Here we see that the benefits do outweigh the disadvantages, however, as employers it is important that you manage your duty of care to ensure that those who may need that extra support whilst working from home are provided for. with 80% suggesting that they work longer hours whilst working from home, it's key that you as an employer review this before your staff experience burnout. For more information on this article or to speak to our specialist recruitment consultants about your next HR role in the charity sector, contact Charlotte Dunkerton on 020 7269 6342 or charlotte.dunkerton@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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The Unique Challenges and Rewards of Working in Charity HR

Posted by Charlotte Dunkerton

Neither employment law nor candidate’s needs and expectations change from sector to sector, yet working in an HR role for a charity does come with certain challenges specific to the charity and non-profit world. Despite the challenges that come along with HR work in the third sector, there are various rewards including work-life balance, autonomy in your role and job satisfaction which undoubtedly make charity HR a career path worth considering. Our specialist charity and Not-For-Profit recruiters have provided insight into the key challenges and rewards that come with working in a charity HR role.   The Challenges of Charity HR Funding & Resourcing Priorities It is not surprising that funding is one of the key challenges faced by HR professionals in the charity sector. Charities are accountable to their funders and often need to be more transparent than private sector companies, and it is important to make beneficiaries feel confident that their donations are being spent wisely and the charity’s budget is being maximised. With Not-For-Profit organisations often under the spotlight about budget spend on administration and overheads, HR professionals can find themselves having to justify spending charity budget on systems or people-related initiatives. The spending of donations on every job advert, new product, training day or induction may need justifying, and getting the message across that HR initiatives are actually highly cost-effective and will deliver savings for the charity in the long run can be a challenge. Recruitment Some HR professionals find it very easy to fill vacancies within charities, often with people who are passionate about the cause and mission of the charity and who are keen to get involved and make a difference. However, recruiting within the third sector does come with its challenges. Frontline staff, particularly staff or volunteers working with vulnerable individuals or children need to be strictly vetted. Additionally, salaries are generally lower in the charity sector which makes recruiting the right people tricky when the best talent could get higher salaries elsewhere or in the corporate sector, particularly with back-office roles like finance, legal or marketing. The key to overcoming this challenge is to develop a creative approach which focuses on building the charity’s brand and cause and highlighting non-financial benefits like flexible working, good work-life balance, learning and development opportunities, and the chance to make a real contribution. Commercial Drive More and more charities are having to take a more commercial approach in their work and charging for services that may have been previously free. This can lead to unrest among employees, particularly if they feel these changes are counter to their values, and charity HR professionals can find themselves having to work hard to communicate the necessity for commerciality to staff members, to keep up staff morale. Ethical Issues There are pressures on charities to be more transparent than ever regarding their policies and practices. Charity HR staff are faced with the challenge of finding the right balance between fulfilling the charity’s aims and making difficult people-related decisions. In other words, balancing a fair, practical and consistent method for effectively managing employees without compromising the atmosphere of passionate care which is often at the heart of the working environments of many charities. It is also very important that HR policies reflect a charity’s mission. For example, a mental health charity should undoubtedly have an excellent internal support structure and resources available for employees, and a children’s charity should have flexible working opportunities and childcare available for working parents, and policies such as these will need to be drawn out and implemented by the charity’s HR department.   The Rewards of Charity HR Making a Difference Many HR professionals who end up working in the third sector do so because they have a commitment or draw to a particular cause. But regardless of this, working for a non-profit organisation can provide a great sense of job satisfaction and a feeling of making a difference in society, and therefore employees are often people who are very passionate and value-driven - which only makes the day-to-day experience of a charity HR professional an enjoyable and fulfilling one as well. Autonomy & Progression As of October 2018, there were 168,186 registered charities in the UK, and the majority of these organisations aren't able to go out to an agency for HR - everything needs to be done in-house. This means that teams are smaller - you may have a team of 3 or 4 instead of a department of 20 in a larger organisation, which in turn means that an HR charity role involves wearing lots of different hats and taking on a generalist role as opposed to a role focusing on one specialist branch of HR. This grants you autonomy in your role, more opportunity to implement change, and the chance to broaden your experience and skill set as an HR professional, and you may find there is a shorter route to progress within the organisation. Other Benefits Charity roles can sometimes be overlooked by HR professionals but no longer is the charity sector seen as the ‘poor cousin’. In reality, third sector organisations can be equally exciting and fast-paced as the commercial sector and also come with benefits like a better work-life balance and the opportunity to utilise your HR skills and experience in an organisation that is contributing towards a cause you are passionate about.   For more information on this article or to speak to our specialist recruitment consultants about your next HR role in the charity sector, contact Charlotte Dunkerton on 020 7269 6342 or charlotte.dunkerton@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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