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Claire Stradling

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Claire Stradling

Associate Director - Charities and NFP

I head up our charity and not for profit division specialising in Finance and HR appointments. I manage a team as well as recruiting for senior level Finance Director, HRD, and CFO roles myself both on a contingency and a retained basis.

I have a large network of clients within the charity sector including NGOs, large international and national charities through to smaller charities and not for profit organisations.

I have over 25 years in recruitment experience and still love the industry. Having a keen interest in charities and charitable causes myself, the move to recruiting for the sector was a natural progression. I have been lucky enough to win many awards throughout my career for my performance which is because I believe I really listen to both our Clients and Candidates and really try to understand both’s unique requirements prior to matching.

Being born and bred in Birmingham, I am a massive Aston Villa fan and try and watch as many games as possible either live or on the TV. I am also a big music fan and go to lots of Gigs. I love a good book and spending time eating and enjoying wine with friends.

claire's latest roles

  • HR Transformation - Snr People Transi...

    £401.00 - £500.00 per day + Inside IR35

    HR Transformation - Senior People Transition Manager London or Manchester £401 PAYE or £500 Ltd You will provide strategic leadership for the people change work-stream in support of the transforming HR progr...

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  • HR Transformation - Senior People Tra...

    £401.00 - £500.00 per day + Inside IR35

    HR Transformation - Senior People Transition Manager Manchester or London £401 PAYE or £500 Ltd You will provide strategic leadership for the people change work-stream in support of the transforming HR progr...

    Read more...
  • HR Transformation - Snr People Transi...

    £401.00 - £500.00 per day + Inside IR35

    HR Transformation - Senior People Transition Manager London or Manchester £401 PAYE or £500 Ltd You will provide strategic leadership for the people change work-stream in support of the transforming HR progr...

    Read more...
  • Interim HR Advisor

    £150 - £200 per day

    HR Advisor - London 3 - 6 months Are you CIPD Level 7? Do you have strong ER and case work experience? Has your service group included regional/remote locations? If so, read on. An animal welfare charity bas...

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  • HR Business Partner/Advisor - Interna...

    £40000 - £42000 per annum

    Do you have experience with a charity/think tank or similar NFP? Do you have international and regional experience? Have you worked with an organisation that has experienced significant growth? Are you CIPD ...

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  • Recruiting Manager

    Negotiable

    Internal Resourcing Adviser Do you have civil service experience and a good knowledge of the Civil Service framework? Have your recruited for a range of corporate services roles including Digital? Are you av...

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What people say about Claire

Claire at Pro Group is a star! Her professionalism and reliability is clearly without parallel . . . I found her recruitment skills to be of a high calibre, and her approach was very refreshing and personal and it made me feel confident in her ability to place me in suitable role...


Firstly thank you so much for being one of the best recruitment consultants, I have dealt with during my search, you are few and far between. Your professional approach with honest and responsive conversation, is exactly what a candidate like...


Claire recently supported me in my quest in finding a new senior HR role. Throughout the experience she was proactive, listened to feedback and worked positively with both her client and myself to discuss, if a role was truly right for me as a person...


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Companies Claire has worked with

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  • W1siziisijiwmtkvmdyvmjgvmdkvmdyvmzqvndm4l0nhc2ugu3r1zhkgtg9nbybuzw1wbgf0zsaomtu4edgychgpicgzmykucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilcixnth4odijil1d
  • W1siziisijiwmtkvmdyvmjgvmdkvmdyvntgvotkyl0nhc2ugu3r1zhkgtg9nbybuzw1wbgf0zsaomtu4edgychgpicgynikucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilcixnth4odijil1d

Parkinson's UK is a charity who empower and support thousands of people living with the condition, inspire health and social care professionals to help drive better care and steer ground-breaking research to improve treatments and to find a cure.

In October 2018 likeminded housing associations Metropolitan and Thames Valley Housing formally completed a partnership to form Metropolitan Thames Valley. Metropolitan Thames Valley provides housing at different levels of affordability for people living in London, the South East, East Midlands and East of England.

Travelzoo is a global media company with over 25 million members across 26 offices worldwide. They publish travel entertainment deals all over the world and have 500+ employees globally.

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claire's articles

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Charity Times - 28/01/2020

Posted by Claire Stradling

STRATEGY The NCVO’s blueprint for the year ahead The NCVO has published its annual blueprint for the year ahead. The Road Ahead 2020 provides NCVO’s annual analysis of the pressures facing the charity sector in the next 12 months, including how charities will need to continue navigating changes in the political landscape; continued pressure on charity funding; and the potential model offered by decentralised movements - such as Extinction Rebellion - for securing support and engagement from younger people. The analysis also looks at the opportunities for charities to be influential local voices as the political focus moves to ‘left behind’ towns and cities; the future of fundraising, as data shows that EU privacy rules have resulted in fewer potential donors being approached for cash; and cybersecurity concerns. On this last issue, the report says “Cybercrime will continue to be a huge risk and email fraud is predicted to become even more sophistic ated ... In order to protect their valuable funds, assets and good reputation, it will be crucial for charities to have greater awareness of cyber-attacks and put a range of security measures in place.” NCVO CEO Karl Wilding said: "The Road Ahead will hopefully help charity leaders plan for the next year. The charity sector will be as vital as ever for all the people it serves, and NCVO has produced this analysis so that charities can head into 2020 with confidence." NCVO Charity Digital News Charity Digital News Civil Society GOVERNANCE Regulator targets poor accounting practices The Charity Commission and the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) have signed an information sharing agreement that will see the charities regulator refer cases of poor professional practice by accountants and finance professionals in the sector to the ACCA. The Commission’s ultimate purpose in signing up to the agreement is to provide a mechanism to alert ACCA to poor practice and, by raising the standards of ACCA practitioners undertaking external scrutiny work for charities, help charities comply with their accounting framework and legal requirements. Nigel Davies, head of accountancy services at the Charity Commission, said the agreement allows the two organisations to “better serve the public interest by promoting high standards of accountancy practice in and for charities.” He said that by working together, the ACCA and the Commission “will raise the standards of the profession and the awareness of charity accounting to assist charities to thrive and inspire trust.” GOV.UK Civil Society Online support surgeries for trustee chairs The Association of Chairs is running a live video series to support trustee chairs at small to medium sized charities on a range of topics. Association of Chairs CEO Rosalind Oakley said: “We often hear from Chairs that their roles can be lonely, and these sessions provide the opportunity to meet and chat through issues with their peers, wherever they may be based.” Topics covered by the online support sessions, which each last an hour and involve up to ten participants, include the roles of vice-chair and chair, running meetings, strategy and corporate governance. Charity Digital News MANAGEMENT New ACEVO guide for applicants to charity CEO roles ACEVO has published a guide about the questions that applicants should ask during the recruitment process for a charity CEO role. The guide notes that while organisations always undertake a thorough assessment of candidates before appointing a new chief executive, applicants don't always spend as much time weighing whether the organisation is right for them. ACEVO says this can mean new CEOs can sometimes encounter “unexpected challenges.” Consultant Ann Frye collaborated with ACEVO on the guide. She says: “For it to be most successful, the recruitment process must be a two-way conversation: as a candidate, you need to feel confident to share any anxieties, and in return, the organisation must be given space to interrogate and respond to your concerns.” ACEVO CEO Vicky Browning observed: “At ACEVO, we’ve seen too many examples of newly appointed CEOs who get their feet under the desk, only to find that all is not as it had see med." Civil Society Charity Today LEGAL New digital portal to strengthen safeguarding guidance The government has launched an online portal to give charities more support when handling safeguarding concerns or allegations. The portal provides a step-by-step guide to help charities correctly manage their concerns, identify the right people to contact if needed, and access helpful resources and advice. Baroness Barran, minister for civil society, said: "It is absolutely right that charities have access to the best advice and guidance for dealing with any safeguarding concerns. Charities must be safe spaces for everyone - be that those who use their important services, volunteers or employees." The portal is to be promoted by six organisations which will highlight the significance of good safeguarding and locally available sources for advice and support. The organisations are Voluntary Organisations Network North East (VONNE), Action with Communities in Rural England (ACRE), Voluntary Action Leeds (VAL) , Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), The Federation of London Youth Clubs – London Youth, and National Association for Voluntary Community Action (NAVCA). GOV.UK Government Computing UKFundraising Charity Digital News COMMUNICATION Charity Commission appoints new comms and policy director The Charity Commission has appointed Paul Latham as its new Director of Communications and Policy. He was previously director of communications at the Office for Fair Trading and has held senior communications roles at the CBI and the Strategic Rail Authority. Mr Latham said: “The charitable sector has never been more vital to our society, and its ability to thrive depends not least on effective regulation in the public interest. Strong, independent regulators ensure that wrongdoing is challenged, but moreover that good people and good ideas can flourish . . . In this context, impactful, strategic communications and a clear policy framework are essential, including in ensuring charity trustees can access the information they need to get things right.” Civil Society Charity Times FUNDRAISING Macmillan tops YouGov charity brand index Macmillan has topped the list of the most popular charities in the UK for the seventh consecutive year, according to a YouGov poll. Cancer Research UK and the British Heart Foundation are in second and third place respectively in the YouGov CharityIndex Buzz Rankings. Guide Dogs, Dogs Trust, RNLI, Royal British Legion, Great Ormond Street Hospital, Battersea Dogs and Cats Home and Mind rounded out the top ten. Amelia Brophy, head of UK data products at YouGov, observed: “Macmillan has remained the most positively talked about charity for the best part of the last decade, demonstrating they are clearly doing something right in the eyes of the public. In a time where there is heightened scrutiny of charities and how they are run, maintaining a positive perception is crucial in order for a charity to function effectiv ely and achieve the charitable goals which are vital to so many causes.” Oxfam took top spot in the most improved charities ranking after recovering from a high-profile scandal in 2018. Charity Times Third Force News The King’s Fund announces £3m fund The King’s Fund has announced a new £3m health and wellbeing fund to "boost communities’ health." The health charity said the scheme will offer funding and support for charities and community organisations to partner with NHS and local authorities when a lack of funding can make it difficult for local organisations to “share their knowledge of the community” with the sometimes overly-bureaucratic public health sector. Richard Murray, chief executive of The King’s Fund, said that charities and public sector can “struggle to work together,” despite “working towards the same goal.” He added: “By working together hand-in-glove, the voluntary sector, NHS and local authority organisations will be able to have a bigger impact on the health of their communities." UKFundraising Civil Society In-memory donors much more likely to leave a legacy A report from legacy consortium Legacy Foresight based on data from 22 charities says in-memory donors are three times more likely to leave a legacy, compared to regular donors who give via direct debit or standing order. Sue Pedley, head of donor research at Legacy Foresight, said: “There is now hard evidence to show that an in-memory relationship with a charity may also lay the foundation for a legacy gift. This research proves how important remembrance is as a motivation for legacy giving. We hope that this evidence will help make the case for greater, more thoughtful investment in in-memory fundraising throughout the sector.” UKFundraising Civil Society WORKFORCE Charity sector salaries continue to rise The latest quarterly job market report from CV-Library suggests the continued rise in salaries in the charity sector has caused a spike in applications for third sector jobs. Salaries in the sector increased by 2.6% in the last months of 2019, at a time when overall salaries in the UK decreased by 7.8%. The data show applications for work within the charity sector increased by 61.7% in the fourth quarter. This is the third highest sector growth rate in the UK after consulting (88.4%) and hospitality (71.6%). Charity Times CAMPAIGNS Employers urged to get staff walking National walking charity Paths for All wants employers to encourage their staff to get walking to improve wellbeing - and also reduce carbon emissions. The charity's Walk at Work award scheme offers employers one-to-one support on how to create a walking culture at work and where to find help and resources. Ian Findlay, chief officer at Paths for All, said: “The benefits of walking for mental health can’t be denied. Research has shown that physical activity helps to reduce anxiety and depression, and . . . On top of that, it is becoming increasingly difficult for companies to ignore the rising concerns and need for action around climate change. They have a growing responsibility to reduce their carbon footprint and introduce policies which put the environment at the centre of their business activities.” Third Force News ​​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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Charity Times - 21/01/2020

Posted by Claire Stradling

GOVERNANCE Regulator bans trustees who used funds to go on holiday Two former trustees of an animal charity have been banned from holding senior charity roles after using the organisation’s money improperly, including to pay for a holiday. The Chichester and District Dog Rescue Society operates in East Sussex and Hampshire and aims to care and support stray and unwanted dogs in these areas. The Charity Commission was first alerted to problems at the charity by an independent examiner in March 2017, who had found discrepancies in its bookkeeping. New trustees are now in place at the charity. Amy Spiller, Head of Investigations Team at the Charity Commission, said: "Trustees are under an obligation to act in the best interests of their charity – by handling donations with care and stewarding funds towards the good cause they serve. The former trustees of this charity failed to deliver on this expectation – they were reckless with the charity’s money and used funds f or their own personal expenses. This almost cost the charity’s future and will have let down people who trusted this charity to help a cause they care about." Separately, Civil Society reports that nearly 7,000 people have petitioned the Charity Commission and the RSPCA to investigate how a dog rescue and rehoming charity is being run. The petition on Change.org claims that Animal Lifeline has unfairly turned down offers to rehome animals from the centre. The charity says the campaign has been orchestrated by an disgruntled individual who was informed that they could not provide a suitable home for a dog. Accountancy Daily GOV.UK Civil Society Regulator to probe footballers' charity The Charity Commission has launched an inquiry into the Professional Footballers' Association (PFA) following concerns about the charity's relationship with its trade union. In November 2018, the regulator opened a regulatory compliance case to explore concerns raised about the charity’s relationship with the PFA trade union and their management of conflicts of interest. Despite extensive engagement with the trustees and other parties since then, the Commission maintains serious concerns. The inquiry will examine the charity’s relationship and transactions with other bodies and whether they are in the best interests of the charity and whether the charity’s activities have been exclusively charitable and for the public benefit, among other issues. Accountancy Daily Charity Times GOV.UK OPERATIONAL Fewer charities in England's most deprived areas A new report suggests that there are fewer charities in the most deprived areas of England. The report from New Philanthropy Capital (NPC), Where are England's charities?, says areas of England that are struggling economically, and which are typically located in post-industrial or coastal regions, are home to fewer charitable organisations. The report observes that necessary resources to set up and run a charity, including access to finance and volunteers, and specialist ‘civic’ skills, may be in shorty supply in deprived areas. Leah Davis, NPC's head of policy, said larger charities have a role to play. "Larger charities can support the smaller ones across the country by sharing resources and expertise, or by working with communities to form new groups. And funders can make their data available on platforms like 360Giving, so others can better target their giving as well, and fund for the long-term so communities have a better chance of sustained change," she said. Civil Society REPUTATION Consultation on responsible investment is launched A consultation has been launched by the Charity Commission into responsible investment and how investments can be aligned with the aims of charitable organisations. A blog post by Sian Hawkrigg, strategic policy adviser at the regulator, notes a growing desire among the public for transparency and an interest in “not just in what a charity achieves, but how it behaves along the way.” The Commission says some charities already have responsible or ethical investment policies, but it is keen to “ensure that others are not shying away from this due to a lack of awareness or the area being seen as too difficult”. Civil Society notes that charities including NCVO, RSPB, ClientEarth, Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust, Nesta, Ashden Trust and Access, alongside law firm Bates Wells, formed a coalition last year to seek a legal ruling on responsible investment. Luke Fletcher, a Partner at Bates Wells, said that the regulator's launch of a consultation “seems a really positive move and direction of travel” - but he cautioned that there “are some underlying tensions in this area.” Civil Society Animal charity and non-profits listed on counter-terror guide Animal Aid, Greenpeace, PETA and Extinction Rebellion are among organisations included in a counter-terrorism police guide. The guide produced by Counter Terrorism Policing also lists neo-Nazi and far-right groups such as Britain First and Make Britain Great Again. Elisa Allen, PETA’s director, said: “This appears to be a sinister attempt to quash legitimate campaigning organisations – something that is as dangerous as it is undemocratic. The animal protection movement is a mainstream movement made up of thousands of organisations and millions of people from around the world who stand up against the exploitation and mistreatment of animals.” A spokesperson for Animal Aid said: “The inclusion of Animal Aid in this guidance, alongside other peaceful organisations, shows a fundamental lack of understanding of animal protection campaigning. It is imperative that th is damaging document is immediately withdrawn, and its content completely overhauled so that peaceful, progressive groups are not included within it." Civil Society COMMUNICATION Charity Film Awards 2020 shortlist is announced The Charity Film Awards 2020 shortlist from public voting has been revealed, with 125 charities listed, and includes entries from We are Sunshine People, Coppafeel!, Groundwork UK, CLIC Sargent, Muslim Aid, and Anthony Nolan. More than 65,000 members of the public voted for their favourite charity film and a panel of experts will now judge the shortlist. Simon Burton, co-founder of the Charity Film Awards, said: “The level of public engagement in the awards is spectacular and it is completely free of charge to the charities involved. The Awards give the truly creative films UK charities produce a context and shot of adrenaline resulting in a huge uplift in viewership, conversation and donations.” UKFundraising DIGITAL Charities to benefit from £8.6m digital fund grants Twenty charities have received £8.6m from The National Lottery Community Fund to improve and scale their digital services. Refugee Action, Relate, Citizen's Advice, Samaritans, Parkinson’s UK and Citizen’s Advice are among major charities who will use their share of the funds to either launch new digital projects or increase the impact of existing ones. Cassie Robinson, Head of Digital Grant Making at The National Lottery Community Fund, said: “We’re delighted to be able to support this diverse set of organisations as they harness digital technology in creative and forward-thinking ways, to both transform the way they operate, and the way that services are delivered across the voluntary sector over the long-term.” Charity Digital News Civil Society FUNDRAISING Guidance to help with Charities Act reporting requirements Guidance to help charities comply with the fundraising reporting requirements in the Charities (Protection and Social Investment) Act 2016 has been published by the Fundraising Regulator. An analysis of over 100 annual reports filed with the Charity Commission found that only 40% of charities included a statement on fundraising that met the requirements of the Act. Lord Toby Harris, Chair of the Fundraising Regulator, said: “Although our review has highlighted a low level of compliance with The Charities Act 2016 in terms of fundraising statements, we recognise that this is the first year of reporting in this manner. We are committed to working with charities, especially those with lower fundraising budgets, to promote better practice in reporting and the importance of providing a comprehensive statement.” Fundraising Regulator CEO Gerald Oppenheim added: “This first year of reporting gives us valuable insight into common issues arising in charities’ fundraising statements.” UKFundraising Charity Times Criticism of royal info on charity patronages Information held by Buckingham Palace on the Royal family's various charity patronages has been described as "inconsistent" and "incomplete." Caroline Fiennes from Giving Evidence, a research firm which wants charitable giving to be based on sound evidence, said there are “conflicting lists [of organisations which have a royal as their patron or president] on various websites” and information that is “markedly different.” Giving Evidence found it “extremely difficult to identify the patronages which are of UK registered charities,” she said, adding “We are still unable to isolate the UK registered charity patronages despite having now spent at least four-person-weeks on it. Hence the numbers often quoted in the press about the number of charities which various Royals are patrons are almost certainly wrong." Civil Society Does philanthropy work? Oxfam GB chief executive Danny Sriskandarajah and Rhodri Davies, the Head of Policy at Charities Aid Foundation, are among those taking part in a BBC discussion about the relative merits of philanthropy and whether the rich give more of their money to the state instead of charitable foundations. BBC News ​ ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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Charity Times - 14/01/2020

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDING A happy new year for Scottish charities More than 60 Scottish charities are to share almost £1.9m of funding from new grant programmes launched by the Bank of Scotland Foundation. The programmes are designed to provide stability for small and medium sized charities seeking to make positive and lasting change by addressing disadvantage or social exclusion. Philip Grant, chair of the foundation’s board of trustees, said: “Our emphasis on social exclusion and disadvantage means that our programmes can continue to help to improve the lives of many vulnerable people across Scotland addressing areas such as homelessness, debt management, reducing isolation and supporting job creation," adding "As the current funding environment in Scotland becomes increasingly challenging, I’m very pleased to confirm that our new strategy sees us continue to provide core funding for charities. We know that core funding is hugely important.&rdquo ; Among the 62 charities to receive grants are: Epilepsy Action Scotland, Scottish Sports Futures, Simon Community Scotland, Beatson Cancer Charity and Motherwell & Wishaw Citizens Advice Bureau. Third Force News DIVERSITY Women are still underrepresented in top charity jobs A report from the Fawcett Society says the UK is “generations away” from achieving gender equality as women remain seriously underrepresented in top jobs across society. The 2020 Sex and Power Index from the women's rights and equality charity found that women account for just over a quarter (27%) of charity CEOs. Meanwhile, there are only six female FTSE 100 chief executives – a figure unchanged since the charity’s last report in 2018. The report also reveals gender equality is "alarmingly" worse for women of colour who are totally absent from senior positions in many sectors. Sam Smethers, Fawcett Society chief executive, said: "Despite much lip service about the importance of having women in top jobs, today's data shows we are still generations away from achieving anything close to equality. If we want change, we have to make it happen." Charity Digital News note that the Fawcett Society is partnering with race equality think tank the Runnymede Trust on the pay and progression of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) women in the workplace. Charity Digital News Financial Times The Times The Guardian The Independent Daily Express MANAGEMENT Scottish charity names new chief executive Rebecca Simpson has been appointed as the new chief executive of Scottish arts in health charity Hearts and Minds. She has previously been schools and sustainable transport manager at Living Streets, and head of young people programmes at Youth Scotland. Simpson said Hearts and Minds “brings together my love of working in health and the arts. The work that Hearts and Minds deliver is very unique and provides so much joy for people at a time when they need it the most.” The charity is this year celebrating the 21st anniversary of its Clowndoctor programme and is seeking to further embed the professional practice of therapeutic clowning in Scotland’s healthcare provision. Third Force News SUPPORT Free online toolkit for smaller charities is upgraded The Charity Excellence Framework, a free charity performance online toolkit, has carried out upgrades aimed at offering support to small charities. The online toolkit covers issues including HMRC regulations and accessing government resources, and also fundraising guides featuring funder lists for smaller organisations. Charity Excellence Framework founder Ian McLintock said: “The biggest upgrade will be the introduction of social franchising. This will enable large multi-site charities, as well as groups of small charities, to access the core system, to create and control new functionality. For example, enabling groups of charities to easily create specialist quality marks and large charities to create their own framework models, with their own top-level dashboards.” Charity Digital News RISK Late returns risk reputations Charities risk reputational damage by submitting late returns, according to the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR). Currently, 1,600 Scottish charities, or 6.5% of the total number, have missed their deadline for submitting the information and have still to submit annual documentation to the regulator. Maureen Mallon, OSCR’s chief executive, said: “Being a registered charity is something to be proud of and this status comes with a number of responsibilities. A charity that fails to meet their obligations can damage their own reputation and potentially affect public confidence in charities. Annual reporting allows charities to demonstrate the great work they do.” Mallon went on to note that the OSCR has the power to take action against charities who don't meet their obligations, and resources are allocated to engage further with organisations that are substantively late. Third Force News Helping charities better manage risk A downloadable set of codes has been published online by the Chartered Institute of Internal Auditors (CIIA) to help charities better manage risk. The codes help organisations to effectively carry out an internal financial audit. BP’s Audit Committee Chair Brendan Nelson explains in a promotional video released by the CIIA about how charities can best use the code's recommendations. “Strong, effective and well-resourced internal audit functions have a central role to play in supporting boards to better manage and mitigate the risks they face. The Code makes 38 important recommendations, including the right for internal audit to attend executive committee meetings, unrestricted access for internal audit to all parts of the business, and a direct line for internal audit to the chief executive. I urge boards, and in particular audit committees, to apply appropriately the Internal Audit Code of Practice to incre ase the effectiveness of their internal audit functions, in the pursuit of stronger corporate governance and risk management,” said Nelson. Charity Digital News GOVERNANCE Regulator bans trustees after theft of funds The founding trustees of Jole Rider Friends, a children’s education charity, have been disqualified from acting as a trustee or in a senior management role of a charity for 12 years after being held responsible for serious mismanagement of governance and finance. The Charity Commission found that David Swettenham and Helen King were guilty of serious misconduct and/or mismanagement in their handling of the charity’s finances and governance, and the pair also failed to comply with warnings from the regulator. Amy Spiller, head of the investigations team at the Charity Commission, said: “The trustees of Jole Rider grossly misused the charity in paying themselves unauthorised remuneration, and in doing so they betrayed their donors as well as those that could have benefited from this charitable support . . . Their behaviour throughout, both in the running of their charity as well as during this inquir y, was a world apart from that expected of trustees.” Swettenham and King say the Commission’s report contains “a serious and misleading distortion of fact” and have filed 27 separate formal complaints to the Commission. Civil Society Accountancy Daily Birmingham Sikh Channel charity investigated by regulator A Birmingham based Sikh broadcasting charity is being investigated by the Charity Commission over "serious regulatory concerns." The regulator said it launched a probe into the governance and financial management of Birmingham-based Sikh Channel Community Broadcasting Company Limited in November after concerns following a meeting with trustees. The commission said it would examine whether trustees had properly exercised their legal duties and responsibilities under charity law in the administration of charitable funds held by the organisation, and will also look at the financial management of the organisation and whether there has been private benefit to the trustees or former trustees, among other issues. GOV.UK BBC News VOLUNTEERING Public sector volunteers are 'less satisfied' than charity volunteers New research from NCVO suggests people who give their time to public services are less satisfied with their experience than those who volunteer for charities. The NCVO's Time Well Spent: Volunteering in the Public Sector survey of 10,000 adults found that public sector volunteers were more likely than charity volunteers to plan to quit. Seventy-six per cent said they would continue volunteering in the public sector compared to 83% of charity volunteers. Although 94% of those volunteering in the public sector say that they were satisfied with their experience, only 47% said they were very satisfied, compared to 58% among charity volunteers. Karl Wilding, chief executive of NCVO, said: “The differences we found in the survey are not always dramatic but along with what we heard in focus groups they do hint at areas for improvement in public sector volunteering programmes, particularly in terms of making role s flexib le and minimising bureaucracy . . . Good volunteering programmes can deliver great returns for communities and public sector bodies, but they do require investment, both financially and in terms of a real commitment from organisations to truly understand volunteering.” Civil Society CAMPAIGNS New charity to tackle inequality in Cambridge A new charity, Cambridge 2030, is being set up to help address inequality in the UK’s most unequal city. The top 6% of earners take home 19% of income generated in the city, while the bottom 20% take home just 2% of total income. The charity aims to bring together Cambridge City Council with businesses, charities, volunteers and academics to create a coordinated plan to address the problem. Executive councillor for housing Richard Johnson says there is a “moral responsibility” on organisations and firms that have profited from being based in the city to help address inequality, and that while the council is spending millions on its anti-poverty strategy, it is restricted by the funding it receives from central Government. The Observer OTHER Charity shop’s designer sale takes in £22,500 The Shelter charity shop in Edinburgh’s Stockbridge collected a record £22,500 during its 17th annual New Year sale of designer brands. The one-week event featured items from names including Alexander McQueen, Vivienne Westwood and Mulberry. The Herald ​ ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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Charity Times - 07/01/2020

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING Older people are generous online New research about online charity donors suggests people over 65 are twice as likely as 18-24 year olds to set up a direct debit online to a charity. Meanwhile, the research suggests millennials are more likely to engage in one-off volunteering opportunities. The poll of 2,086 UK adults for Reason Digital also found that Facebook and Twitter are the most influential channels for inspiring popular charity engagement. Nevertheless, 15% of 65-year olds said they weren’t “passionate about any causes” despite being offered over 25 options. Elsewhere, the research found Gen Y is four times more likely than older people to be influenced by a cause they have seen online, and is particularly motivated by causes related to mental health and climate change. Matt Haworth, co-founder of Reason Digital, said fundraisers should "expand their digital skills in preparation for when the crossover between online and offline donations happens. Charities could also consider whether offline fundraising products can be translated to online and even focus on which services could work digitally – the potential this could create in reaching more people in need is huge." UKFundraising Focus on Muslim giving in the UK Naeem Raza provides FundraisingUK with an introduction to Muslim giving in the UK. He notes the Muslim community in Britain donates over £500m to causes around the world, including the UK. Volunteering among young people in the UK's Muslim community is also increasing. The author notes that although there are certain restrictions around compulsory giving (Zakat), voluntary giving (Sadaqah) has few limitations and can be paid by anyone for any amount. UKFundraising NEW YEAR HONOURS Charity leaders are recognised in New Year Honours list Fundraisers and charity leaders are among those who have been recognised in the New Year Honours list. Citizens Advice CEO Gillian Guy and Julia Unwin, chair of the independent inquiry on the future of civil society, were both made Dames. Scout Association CEO Matt Hyde was awarded an OBE for services to young people. Professor Jeremy Pearson, the British Heart Foundation’s longest serving associate medical director, was awarded an MBE for services to medical research. Nick Buckley, who founded Manchester’s anti-social behaviour reduction charity Mancunian Way, also received an MBE for his endeavours in voluntary services and the local community. Battersea CEO Claire Horton was awarded a CBE in recognition of her services to animal welfare and Samaritans CEO Ruth Sutherland also received a CBE in recognition of her services to vulnerable people. Shelter CEO Polly Neate, and Claire Dove, who is the government's VCSE crown representative and chief executive of Blackburne House, also received the CBE. WheelPower CEO Martin McElhatton was awarded an OBE for services to disability sport. John Poyton, the CEO of youth work charity Redthread, Living Streets CEO Joseph David Irvin, and Charlotte Hill, the chief executive of Step Up To Serve, all received OBEs. Civil Society UKFundraising LEGAL Judge rules ethical veganism is protected by law Judge Robin Postle has ruled that ethical veganism is protected under the Equality Act 2010 as a philosophical belief. The ruling came during a tribunal in Norwich, in which Jordi Casamitjana claimed the League Against Cruel Sports, an animal welfare charity, wrongfully sacked him after he raised concerns that its pension fund invested in firms connected to animal testing. The ruling entitles ethical vegans to lawful protection from discrimination. Ethical vegans differ from dietary vegans as they also try to avoid all forms of animal exploitation in their lives, including wearing clothing made from animal products and not using products that have been tested on animals. The legal team representing Mr Casamitjana said after the hearing that animal rights activists could now even try to obtain a judicial review into whether the Bank of England’s use of tallow in £5 and £10 notes co nstitutes indirect discrimination against their devout beliefs. The Daily Telegraph Financial Times The Guardian The Times Daily Mirror Daily Mail The Sun Daily Express GOVERNANCE Union urges St Mungo’s boss to step down The Unite union wants St Mungo’s chief executive, Howard Sinclair, to step down after he mistakenly sent an email to a union official. Unite claims Sinclair wants to discourage staff from joining the union and accuses him of anti-trade union tactics. The email from Sinclair stated that there is “no need to change tac (sic),” adding “Our strategy should be to . . . stop more people joining and erode support.” Unite regional officer Tabusam Ahmed, referring to discontent over staff working conditions, said: “This email blunder has exposed Sinclair’s true colours. He must now do the decent thing and step down immediately to clear the way for negotiations to re-start with a clean slate.” A St Mungo’s spokesperson said: “St Mungo’s formally recognises both Unison and Unite and we actively encourage our staff to join the union of their choice and participate as they choose. " Howard Sinclair is due to stand down in the autumn. Civil Society ‘Serious concerns’ over Perth charity governance The majority of the board of Horsecross Arts, which runs Perth Theatre and Perth Concert Hall, has resigned following a critical external audit. Perth and Kinross Council said the audit raised “serious concerns” about Horsecross Arts’ governance and management, concerns which had “been magnified over the last year.” The charity had been criticised earlier this year for its use of zero-hour contracts. Council leader Cllr Murray Lyle said newly-appointed chief executive Nick Williams will remain in place, and has “the full support of the council and its staff.” BBC News VOLUNTEERING New Year’s resolutions don't feature charity work A YouGov poll suggests volunteering and charity work is typically low down on people’s lists of New Year’s resolutions. The survey of 2,020 UK adults in December found that, overall, volunteering or charity work was a priority for just 6% of New Year resolvers. UKFundraising CAMPAIGNS Charities and care groups push for long-term plan A number of charities and health providers, including the Independent Care Group (ICG), the NHS Confederation and the Alzheimer’s Society have demanded that Prime Minister Boris Johnson make good on his pledge to produce a “long-term plan” to solve the social care crisis. The ICG has launched its social care manifesto, calling on politicians to commit to investing more in care from taxation or National Insurance. Chair Mike Padgham said: “I believe that people are now willing to pay a little more through taxation or National Insurance if it means we, as a country, get a proper social care service to give our older and vulnerable people the care they deserve. We must also ensure people receiving publicly funded care receive it in their own home or close to where they live so they aren't forced to move away from their community.” The ICG also wants a minimum, agreed level of care fees to be instituted , along with VAT zero-rating for social care businesses, and greater powers for the Care Quality Commission to oversee commissioning practices. Daily Express Government’s ‘abject failure’ to promote cycling Charitable organisation Cycling UK has accused the Government of presiding over an “abject failure” to promote cycling, after Department for Transport statistics revealed that just 16.1% of people cycled at least once a month in England in 2017/18 – down from 16.9% the previous year, and 17.1% in 2015/16. Participation rates varied significantly from area to area, with just 5.9% cycling once a month in the London borough of Havering or in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, while 63.7% of adults in Cambridge cycled at least once a month. Cycling UK’s policy director, Roger Geffen, said a change of approach was needed: “From April next year the government has set aside no more money for councils to build cycling infrastructure. That's an abject failure for this incoming government to address the climate, air pollution and inactivity health-related crises the UK faces.” The Times OTHER Boxing charity helping youths tackle mental health The Guardian profiles Empire Fighting Chance, an inner-city Bristol charity, which teaches boxing to thousands of people aged eight to 25 while equipping them with the skills to tackle their mental health problems. The charity, which takes referrals from schools, pupil referral units, police, and child and adolescent mental health services, has built up a record of helping hard-to-reach young people who often do not respond to traditional therapies. The charity’s Training with the Champions programme combines non-contact boxing with counselling and mentoring for troubled young people who may be at risk of exclusion from school, substance abuse, or involvement in antisocial behaviour, often passed down through the generations. The Guardian ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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Charity Times - 17/12/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

STRATEGY Charity sector reacts to Conservative election victory Charity leaders have responded to a general election result which saw the Conservatives returned to power with a substantial majority. Rita Chadha, chief executive of the Small Charities Coalition, said: “The Small Charities Coalition will be shortly launching a campaign for all MPs to meet with small charities in their constituency. This is an opportunity to understand how small charities operate, hear our concerns and forge relationships that benefit us all. The #SmallCharitiesMovement will be on the march in January [and] we hope MPs, from all political parties, will join us.” Vicky Browning, chief executive of ACEVO, said: “While the election result creates big changes in parliament, it does not change what civil society exists to do or what we will be trying to achieve." Peter Lewis, chief executive of the Institute of Fundraising, said: “In the first year of the new government we hope to have fundraising recognised as a chartered profession, and want to work with MPs from all parties to champion excellent fundraising, and its fundamental role in creating a better world”. Elizabeth Chamberlain, acting policy director at NCVO, said: “The most important [task] is establishing a clear and credible way forward on Brexit that upholds existing rights and standards and which provides certainty for charities and ensures they can continue to recruit the skilled staff they need. It's equally crucial that the expertise of charities is taken on board in the Brexit process." Civil Society Charity Digital News Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation to merge Asthma UK and the British Lung Foundation (BLF) say they expect to save around £2m annually in running costs after their merger. The new entity called Asthma UK and British Lung Foundation Partnership is likely to have an income of around £17m. Kay Boycott, the former CEO at Asthma UK who will be the first chief executive of the partnership, said: “Bringing together our joint vision and strategy will allow us to make even more impact, with more money to spend on ground-breaking research and support . . . Our new organisation will combine the energy and passion of the UK’s top respiratory health charities, creating a powerful voice for change.” Civil Society RISK Regulator warns about charity bank fraud The Charity Commission has warned charities against bank fraud after a rise in reports from organisations which have been targeted by fraudsters impersonating members of staff who seek to change employees' bank details. The regulator is advising charities to be aware of particular signs of fraudulent activity including requests to change employee bank details by a spoofed or similar e-mail address. In all the cases reported to the Charity Commission, the request was made by email. The Charity Commission's head of development and operational intelligence said: “We know several charities have been targeted by this fraud and we want to ensure others are equipped to protect themselves. So our message to charities is clear – read and understand our guidance on fraud – and check who’s sending an email whenever you receive a message about changes to staff bank details.” Charity Times More than 100 data breaches to ICO More than 100 data breaches were reported by charities to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) in the second quarter of 2019/20, according to the regulator's latest figures. The 108 reported incidents are however down on the same period in the previous year, when 137 incidents were reported. Loss or theft of paperwork in an insecure location, loss or theft of a device containing personal data, data emailed to the wrong recipient and a failure to use the blind carbon copy (Bcc) feature when sending emails all featured as reasons for data breaches. The regulator received 2,984 reports of breaches from all sectors in the second quarter. Charity Digital News Civil Society FUNDRAISING Brits prefer to donate for Christmas More than half of people in the UK say they prefer to receive a donation given on their behalf rather than a gift, according to a study by PayPal. Meanwhile, 53% plan to donate over the festive period, the study says. The research for the digital payments company carried out by Opinion Matters earlier this month polled 2,000 adults and also found that 59% of respondents said it is difficult to donate at Christmas because they don't have enough money to give, and almost 5% of respondents said they don’t have the time. Meanwhile, PayPal has revealed its international giving figures leading up to Christmas. The company is collecting data relating to all money donated to good causes since November 27th this year. The US has raised £359.4m ($481m) through PayPal, while the UK has raised £33.8m ($45.3m), Canada has donated £22.3 ($29.9m), and Germany has raised £18.7m ($25m). UKFundraising Charity Digital News Video rewards for contactless donors Animal charity Blue Cross is using cashless payment technology that offers a video ‘thank you’ to those who give money to their cause. The portable contactless devices include a screen that enables the display of a promotional video, and those who donate receive a ‘video reward’ showing a cat or dog as a way of a thank you. “The idea is that these kinds of interactions are essential in order to capture the imagination of donors and drive engagement around contactless technology. Simply buying the devices isn’t always enough to get donors using them,” Bond and Coyne, the campaign agency that developed the initiative for Blue Cross, said. Charity Digital News The UK's most generous cities Research by social fundraising platform GoFundMe reveals the UK cities that give the most money to charity. Edinburgh is the most generous city in the UK, Cambridge and Bath were the second and third respectively, followed by Derry, Norwich and Bristol. The top ten was rounded out by Plymouth, Exeter, Ipswich and Liverpool. Meanwhile, Ireland is the most generous nation in the world based on donations per capita, followed by the United States, Australia, Canada, and the UK in fifth place. Friday is the most popular day for people in the UK to donate and 8pm the most popular time, according to the research. Charity Times Third Force News FINANCE Cash deposit platform for charities only A cash deposit platform that gives charities exclusive access to market-leading interest rates has been launched by the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF). The platform provides access to a range of more than 170 deposit accounts from 22 lenders for charities with savings starting at £50,000. CAF has partnered with cash deposit platform provider Flagstone to provide the platform, and Flagstone co-managing partner Andrew Thatcher says: “With first-hand experience of working with charity trustees, we understand the importance of making sure that reserve funds held on deposit generate as much interest income as possible. We’re extremely proud to be partnering with CAF to help more charities maximise their income and manage risk – making donations go further and providing finance directors and trustees with greater control and peace of mind.” UKFundraising COMMUNICATION How charity leaders can stem the fall in public trust Charity Commission chair Baroness Stowell has said charity leaders must do more to show that they understand public expectations and what they are doing to change if they want to maintain the public trust. Speaking at an event for women chairs and chief executives of charities, she said: “People want to see that what goes on in a charity is motivated by the same spirit of charity that prompts them to volunteer at a shelter on Christmas day, or sacrifice a luxury for themselves in order to make a larger Christmas donation . . . People want charity leaders to be more conscious in showing they understand what is expected of them." She also said the regulator must do more to support smaller charities, and said there is a “big task in ensuring that our register data is a useful tool that helps people make informed choices about how to give to charity, and get involved in charity”. Civil Society GOVERNANCE Inquiry is launched into SPAC Nation The Charity Commission is opening a statutory inquiry into SPAC Nation in a probe that will examine financial, governance and safeguarding matters at the charity. SPAC Nation, a London based charity that seeks to advance Christianity, has been subject to a regulatory compliance case since April 2018, which was opened to examine safeguarding and financial concerns. A Charity Commission spokesperson said: "Charities exist to improve lives and strengthen society; the issues that have been raised related to SPAC Nation in recent weeks are highly concerning, even more so as the allegations are entirely at odds with the expectations about the way that charities will operate. The opening of this inquiry is an important step that will allow us to examine these concerns further and establish the facts. We will seek to provide assurance to the public and the community that these matters will be considered fully and, where necessary, resolved." Civil Society Accountancy Daily GOV.UK ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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Charity Times - 10/12/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

STRATEGY SCC new CEO on strategy and Charity Commission The new chief executive of the Small Charities Coalition (SCC), Rita Chadha, speaks to Harriet Whitehead in Civil Society about the organisation’s new strategy. The strategy, which will be in place for April, focuses on three key areas: “redefining our remit”, “making sure we go outside London”, and “creating a roar”. Ms Chadha also claimed the Charity Commission does not understand the “day-to-day reality” of running small charities and that the regulator’s tone can intimidate. In response, Charity Commission chief executive Helen Stephenson CBE said: “Having run a small charity myself, and worked as a volunteer, a trustee, a funder, a policy-maker and a regulator, I am fully alive to the challenges that small charities face, as well as the huge value that they bring to the sector.” Civil Society FUNDRAISING Festive period sees spike in donations eBay for Charity data shows a spike in charitable donations from eBay’s UK buyers and sellers during November and December. On Black Friday in 2018 eBay for Charity saw donations of £106,194. November was the most charitable month between 2011 and 2018, with UK users giving an average £1,989,412, with an average December donation amount totalling £1,640,618. Between 2011 and 2018, eBay for Charity saw UK donations increase by 60%, reaching £22.91m last year, and this year is on track to surpass that figure. eBay UK donated 5p for every transaction on the site during the 3rd December for its Give Day promotion, which is in partnership with The Prince’s Trust, and 10p for every transaction of two or more items. eBay UK vice president Rob Hattrell comments: “Customers can help change the lives of young entrepreneurs who may require a little support to help them realise their dreams, and the best part is it won’t cost them a penny. eBay has always been a friend to small businesses and we want to help the next generation by supporting The Prince’s Trust Enterprise Programme this Give Day.” Retail Times Retail Gazette Insight-ful JustGiving research Research from consultancy firm Insight-ful shows that fundraisers who personalise their statement on JustGiving raise 3.4 times more than those who stick with the default statement. The analysis of 200,000 statements also shows that company appeals raise more than individual fundraisers. The highest online totals are raised by supporters of religious and disability charities, while cancer research and animal charities raise on average the lowest. The research also found that 20% of fundraisers on JustGiving account for 70% of the total amount raised. The report, called ‘Why people participate in events fundraising?’ also finds that the words used in a personal statement can affect the amount raised. The words Plz, Selfie, Xbox, Mixed Martial Arts and Glitter seem to have a negative impact, whereas statements including the words Workmates, Solicitors, CEO, Mission, Improves and Immeasurable raise the most money. Third Force News Fundraising.com Generational divide in charity New research from social enterprise Reason Digital has found that people aged over 65 are twice as likely to set up a direct debit charitable contribution than those aged between 18 to 24. Online donations account for 44% of charity supporters, compared with 52% who give money offline. The most influential online platforms for encouraging charitable engagement among the public are Facebook and Twitter. Younger people are four times more likely than the older group to feel connected to a cause they had seen online, and mental health causes are four times more important to 18-42 year olds than older people. The most important cause among 20% of the younger age group is climate change. Reason Digital co-founder Matt Haworth said: “Charities should ensure their comms aren’t leaving people behind.” Third Force News Charitable vending machines Vending machines that offer the public an opportunity to donate to good causes instead of buying snacks have been placed at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Hyde Park Chapel in London. The vending machines will be available throughout December and are part of a global Light the World initiative, which spans 10 cities worldwide. Last year, the scheme raised £1.8m in 38 days across five cities. People are able to purchase a range of charitable donations or items, including nappies for Hammersmith and Fulham Foodbank, job training for a veteran at the Royal British Legion, and support for the homeless through GlassDoor Homeless. Charity Digital News Original Picasso on offer in charity raffle A worldwide raffle is offering the prize of an original Picasso valued at €1m, with tickets costing $100 (£85), in aid of CARE International. Anybody will be able to purchase a ticket for the 1 Picasso for 100 Euros raffle until 6 January 2020. The 1921 oil painting, Nature Morte, is currently on display in the Picasso Museum in Paris. The funds raised will provide access to clean water and education to 200,000 people through CARE International’s projects in Cameroon, Madagascar and Morocco. There are 200,000 tickets available, making the chance of winning around 700 times higher per ticket than winning the EuroMillions jackpot, according to the charity. Fundraising.com Digital payments firm launches Christmas appeal A Christmas appeal has been launched by digital payments firm Nochex in aid of small charities. The appeal will see shoppers asked to make a donation through the receipt function when making a purchase through the payment firm’s services. The receipts will offer information about the charity before asking for a donation. So far, the four charities that have signed up to the Christmas appeal are: Meningioma UK, Forces Children’s Trust, London-based Doorstop Homeless Families Project and African Village School Fund. The firm is currently looking for more charities to take part. Nochex chief commercial officer Andrew Baiden said: “We have never really done anything like this before, but now that it is up and running we are looking to promote it locally and nationally through our network of thousands of online merchants.” Charity Digital News Charity Christmas No. 1 contenders With the Official Christmas Number 1 to be declared on Friday 20 December, Melanie May considers the charity contenders for the title in Fundraising.com. The charity entrants include When a Child was Born, in support of Brain Tumour Research; The X-Factor cover of Snow Patrol’s Run, benefitting Shooting Star Children’s Hospices and Together for Short Lives; Share Christmas with Someone for the MS Trust; Star of Glasgow’s Green & White for Celtic FC Foundation’s Christmas Appeal; Peppa Pig’s Bing Bong Christmas for Save the Children; and Very Good This Year (Ho Ho Ho) in support of Alder Hey Children’s Hospital. Fundraising.com Software will cut the cost of accepting cashless donations Digital consultancy Caution Your Blast, in partnership with online payments firm SumUp, has developed software to cut costs for charities which accept cashless donations. The agency claims that the cost of setting up cashless donations can be cut from around £500 to £100. So far, around 400 charities have signed up. Charity Digital News FINANCE CAF launched charity banking platform The Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) has launched a new online banking platform exclusively for charities with savings of at least £50,000, through a partnership with cash deposit platform provider Flagstone. The CAF Charity Deposit Platform will offer charities access to a range of over 170 bank accounts from 22 banks and building societies offering market-leading interest rates. The platform will enable organisations to access multiple accounts through a single application, with the service also providing access to consolidated statements, an annual interest summary and financial strength information. It will be launched in January next year. Third Force News Anonymous donor saves local charity An anonymous donor has saved Devon-based bereavement charity Families in Grief from collapse. In November, the charity announced plans to close at the end of January after it failed to secure funding of £100,000. The organisation had struggled financially for the past year. The organisation is now seeking two new trustees and has appealed for fundraising and office volunteers. The charity said: “Miraculously, an anonymous donor has stepped forward which means that Families In Grief (FIG) has been saved from closing.” Civil Society POLITICS Charities pose questions to political parties Representatives from five political parties answered questions from charity leaders about their policies during a debate regarding civil society issues on 4th December. The debate was organised by the Charities Aid Foundation and NCVO, and was chaired by Buzzfeed news editor Alan White. Both Labour and Conservative representatives, Vicky Foxcroft and Baroness Barran, pledged additional public spending, with the Green Party representative Caroline Russell stating that the party would deliver social justice through a focus on creating a “wellbeing” based economy. The Liberal Democrats’ Baroness Barker said that the “overlooked” sector needed to be part of key discussions, and Brexit Party spokesperson Matthew Patten said that Brexit poses a “major opportunity” for charities. Civil Society PEOPLE CAF CEO stepping down Sir John Low will be leaving his role as Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) chief executive of next year, having held the title since 2007. A successor will be appointed by a sub-committee of trustees, along with CAF chair Sir James Leigh-Pemberton, at which point Sir John will leave the organisation. Sir John said: “This is an exciting time for CAF with many unique opportunities to develop the support given to individual and corporate donors, and to build the capacity and strength of civil society at a global level.” Civil Society Third Force News CLIC Sargent appoints new chair Professor Sir David Haslam has been appointed to the role of chair at cancer support charity CLIC Sargent’s board of directors. He will be taking up the position in January, replacing Peter Hollins. CLIC Sargent chief executive Kate Lee said: “He brings with him a wealth of NHS knowledge and networks which will help us on our mission to make sure that everyone diagnosed with cancer under-25 gets the support they need.” Third Force News Charity Today CAMPAIGNS Scottish candidates shown reality of visual impairment RNIB Scotland have shown Scottish parliamentary candidates the challenges faced by blind and partially-sighted voters in an effort to illustrate the importance of accessible streets. Three Edinburgh North and Leith candidates were given spectacles that simulate sight loss conditions before being taken for a walk, accompanied by Alan Dudley and his guide dog Emma. Catriona Burness, campaigns manager for RNIB Scotland, said: "We know streets can't always be free of clutter. But we can do more to make them accessible. That's why we are urging elected MPs to help ensure that blind and partially sighted people are able to get out and about independently. ” Ms Burness added that the organisation wants MPs to “ deliver on the recommendations on accessible street design set out in Westminster's Women and Equalities Committee Report, Building for Equality: Disability and the Built Environment.” Third Force News ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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Charity Times - 03/12/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

COMMUNICATION The young think better of charity chiefs than older people People under 45 are more inclined to trust charity chief executives to tell the truth than older people, according to Ipsos Mori's Veracity Index 2019 Trust in Professions Survey. Overall, the public's trust in charity chief executives has declined, according to the poll of 1,020 people. Less than half of respondents (45%) said charity leaders are likely to tell the truth – down 3% from last year. Ipsos found that 58% of people under the age of 45 believed charity chief executives would tell the truth, and exactly the same share aged 45 and over said the opposite. The study suggests charity chiefs are less trusted than doctors, who 90% of people said were likely to tell the truth, teachers (89%), and members of the clergy (65%). But charity leaders are more trusted to tell the truth than bankers (43%), estate agents (30%), journalists (26%) and government ministers in Westminster (17%), according to the poll. Kristiana Wrixon, head of policy at ACEVO, said: "This poll is cause for reflection but not necessarily alarm . . . Charity leaders should, and mostly do, act transparently, responsibly and in line with their charitable objectives. They should be confident that they are trusted by the community they serve and work alongside. Trust, especially in uncertain times, can be volatile and ACEVO will continue to champion the work of civil society CEOs to build trust in the role of charity in our society." Third Force News Civil Society STRATEGY Some charities have almost no digital activity The sixth edition of Lloyds Bank’s Charity Digital Index finds that 13% (26,000) of charities have had almost no digital activity in 2019 – an increase of 10,000 on last year. Nevertheless, the report notes that there are 24,000 more charities which are almost "digital by default" when compared to last year, and overall, charities are reporting more benefits to being online. Charity Bank CEO Ed Siegel said: "Investing in technology drives efficiencies throughout any business, can open up new streams of income generation and protect organisations from the risk of cyber-attacks; according to official data one in five charities have experienced a cyber breach in the last year. However, it’s also really important to invest in the workforce’s digital skills to ensure it is being used as effectively as possible, to maximise the benefits in the years to come." Meanwhile, a report from the Weston Charity Awards suggests that fewer small charities are prioritising digital skills. Only 33% of small charity leaders listed IT and digital skills as one of their three priority areas for staff this year. Elsewhere, the report found that half of small charity leaders are working on improving diversity and inclusion among their trustees; a quarter say they need to do more in this area. UKFundraising Civil Society Charity Digital News BofE chief economist wants sector productivity review Bank of England chief economist Andy Haldane says the charity sector needs a productivity review. Mr Haldane, who is also the co-founder of Pro Bono Economics, writes in the December edition of Charity Finance magazine that the charity sector needs an equivalent of the public sector’s Atkinson Report, which was commissioned by the government to identify improvements to how the public sector measured productivity. “What we need today is the equivalent of the Atkinson Review for the third sector: an authoritative account of what a coherent and comprehensive measurement framework for the charitable would look like and how to develop it, recognising the different conceptions of ‘value’ and ‘productivity’ this gives rise to,” he writes. Civil Society Transforming small charity service delivery with AI Charity Digital News hosts a video which looks at how artificial intelligence is helping smaller charities drive impact. The video is a collaboration between food bank The Welcome Centre and charity data partner DataKind, and is designed to dispel the notion that AI and machine learning are beyond the reach of most small charities. Charity Digital News FUNDRAISING Charity Bank raises nearly £5m in subordinated debt Nearly £5m in subordinated debt has been raised by Charity Bank. The successful fundraising, and also plans to attract an additional £10m in new equity investment from charities, trusts and foundations, will enable Charity Bank to increase its support for the social sector and expand its capacity to respond to rising demand for repayable finance. Charity Bank CEO Ed Siegel said: “We believe that the current expansion of our investor base represents a potentially very powerful opportunity for many charities, trusts and foundations looking to use social investment as one means to achieve their social objectives. We will leverage every pound of the investment we raise to make around £8 of loans to help charities and social enterprises fulfil their missions and tackle some of the most challenging issues facing UK society today.” He added: “Further equity investment will help Charity Bank become an enduring institution that can continue responding to the needs of the sector and allow more savers to put their money to work for the benefit of society." UKFundraising National UK Charity Week has started Charities are celebrating UK Charity Week. The event is always held within the first full week of December, and is this year sponsored by TheGivingMachine. Lee Rayment, the founder of UK Charity Week, said: “There is a real sense on our streets that society and community spirit in the UK has taken a big hammering with so much negative media and other influences taking its toll on morale. This year, we want to work to bridge that divide and to remind people that our communities cannot thrive without unity, and here we have so many charities playing a pivotal role on our behalf.” Charity Today Charity Today It's Giving Tuesday Around 3,200 charities and businesses across the UK are participating in today’s Giving Tuesday, the annual global day for raising money and awareness for good causes. PayPal is match funding donations made by anyone using PayPal on the PayPal UK fundraising page or the PayPal App to the PayPal Giving Fund up to £150,000. RBS will also be matching staff payroll giving contributions and promoting Giving Tuesday to its more than 1.5 million MyReward Customers. Meanwhile, eBay UK will donate 5p for every transaction on ebay.co.uk, and 10p if a customer purchases two or more items, to The Prince’s Trust. UKFundraising Third Force News UKFundraising Aids charity hooks up with dating app Mobile dating app Happn is donating 5% of the money it generated on World Aids Day (December 1st) to help not-for-profit body HIV/Aids campaign (Red) in its work in developing countries. The collaboration continues throughout this month, with users of the app being invited to take part in (Red)’s ‘Shopathon’ campaign. Charity Digital News LEGAL Charity threatens legal action against NHS England NHS England has been threatened with legal action after it blocked the publication of a major independent report into maternity care in the NHS. Hospital bosses delayed the release of the Mothers and Babies: Reducing Risk through Audits and Confidential Enquiries across the UK (MBRRACE) report, citing purdah – the ban on civil servants publishing politically sensitive information during an election period. Now Birthrights, a charity that promotes human rights in maternity care, has sent a legal warning to Simon Stevens, chief executive of the NHS in England, demanding he make the report public without delay. The Independent CAMPAIGNS Misogyny should be standalone offence, say charities Women’s charities says misogyny should be a standalone offence in Scotland, according to a report from feminist policy organisation Engender. Laws around hate crimes are currently being reviewed, with MSPs deciding between introducing a “gender hostility” aggravation and the creation of a standalone offence. Engender said that the “gender hostility” route – which would add gender or sex to the list of characteristics already covered by hate crime legislation – would not solve the problem of misogyny, and could even undermine the existing policy. Emma Ritch, Engender executive director, said: “Misogynistic harassment harms individual women and restricts all women and girls’ capacity to participate fully in public life. We know from international examples where this has been tried, that simply adding gender to a list of hate crime aggravations has only resulted in a handful of investigations and prosecutions of hate crimes targeted at women. This is not enough to tackle the egregious misogynistic abuse women and girls face in schools, workplaces, online, and in public space. We need a new approach.” Third Force News Charity issues winter homelessness warning The Salvation Army has warned that hundreds of homeless people are likely to die over the winter, and is calling for urgent investment in support services, particularly for those with “complex, multiple needs,” such as drug abuse, childhood trauma and relationship breakdown. While charities and local authorities will open emergency night shelters as temperatures fall, criteria will differ from location to location, creating a postcode lottery for shelter. The Observer spoke to Salvation Army captain John Clifton, who said that “any extreme weather conditions exacerbate existing health problems and makes those underlying problems like mental health or addiction more difficult to cope with,” adding that the charity sees a “high proportion of people who can’t access state benefits and it makes it difficult for them.” The Observer Poppyscotland takes Bud on tour Poppyscotland has developed an 18-tonne transforming exhibition-on-wheels, Bud, that will tour schools, community spaces and events over the next four years to give the public a deeper understanding of remembrance and the role of the poppy in modern Scottish society. Bud will visit all 32 local authority areas over the coming years. Mark Bibbey, the charity’s chief executive, said: “Over the next four years, Bud will play an important role in exploring the history of remembrance, through the eyes of veterans and ex-service men and women.” Edinburgh Evening News Homeless people need their dogs Housing providers are being urged to support homeless people in allowing them to keep their dogs. Homelessness charity Simon Community Scotland is working with Dogs Trust to help direct the response to homeless people and their pets. Their Paws for Thought guidance highlights the positive role dogs can play in people's lives and offers to support social landlords in helping people who have experienced homelessness to maintain their relationships with their pets. BBC News ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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Charity Times - 26/11/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING Cancer charity increases donations by online payments overhaul Online donation income at Prostate Cancer UK has risen by a third after an overhaul of the charity's digital giving and payment system. The upgraded system now being used has an enhanced focus on digital wallet options, which are being increasingly used by supporters. The digital giving and payments system has also been integrated with other digital systems being used by the charity to create the potential for customised “online journeys” for specific appeals. Sadie Crabtree, head of digital at Prostate Cancer UK, said: “Data from other fundraising tools showed that a lot of our supporters prefer secure digital payments rather than typing in their card details when the option is available. Our improved donation journey lets them do that, and they’re giving more, so it’s fantastic to see the response.” Separately, UKFundraising takes a look at four ways that companies can use contactless giving at Christmas to benefit some of the UK’s smaller charities. Charity Digital News UKFundraising Millionaires and charities ‘lack faith’ A “lack of faith” between charities and high net worth individuals (HNWIs) means charities are missing out on £46.4bn, according to a new report, Barriers to Giving 2020. The report highlights a "lack of understanding and poor communication" between charities and many of the UK's wealthiest people, and said the additional billions could be created for charities if every multi-millionaire in the UK increased donations to 1% of their total income. Barclays Private Bank, which compiled the figures in the report, in partnership with The Beacon Collaborative and the Institute of Fundraising (IoF), aims to bridge this gap. Peter Lewis, chief executive of the IoF, which will work to deliver a series of events to help fundraisers engage and form long-term relationships with wealthy individuals, said: “We’re delighted to be bringing the findings of Barriers to Giving 2020 to life for the hundreds of charities we support . . . At the same time, there is a need to help HNWIs better understand charities and the impact we know is achieved.” Charity Times CharityCheckout reduces platform fee to zero Fundraising platform CharityCheckout has removed its 5% platform fee on donations and is instead asking donors if they wish to make an additional voluntary contribution to support its function. CharityCheckout founder and CEO Chester Mojay-Sinclare said that the move “will result in huge savings for our charity clients.” Simon Franklin, operations manager of charity Dig Deep, which uses CharityCheckout for online fundraising, concurred. He says: “Saving 5% on every donation is very important to Dig Deep. We anticipate annual savings of £25,000 which will contribute significantly to improving access to clean water and sanitation in rural Kenya.” UKFundraising Pilot platform for feedback on funders A pilot platform that allows fundraisers to anonymously share their experience of applying to trusts and foundations has now published more than 100 reviews. GrantAdvisor started in the US, and the pilot of a UK version of the platform has seen fifteen foundations opt-in, including big national funders including the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, Paul Hamlyn Foundation and Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales, and specialist funders such as the Joffe Charitable Trust and Jerwood Arts. UKFundraising Using TikTok to engage young audiences Charity Digital News takes a look at how charities can use social media platform TikTok to raise awareness and engage audiences. The platform's ‘TikTok For Good’ initiative sees nonprofits, charities and NGOs engage the typically youthful user base with ‘Hashtag Challenges’ whereby users create their own content to show support for campaigns. Meanwhile, UKFundraising takes a look at the new Facebook fundraising tools that have been unveiled in the run-up to Christmas, including Fundraiser Stickers in Facebook Stories, Charity Livestreaming, and Instagram donate button on business account profiles. Charity Digital News UKFundraising Social investment market value grows by 30% The social investment market in the UK has grown by 30% in the last year and is now worth over £3.5bn, according to the latest estimate by Big Society Capital. Jeremy Rogers, chief investment officer, Big Society Capital, said: “The market’s impressive growth is being driven in part by increasing awareness of and confidence in taking on investment by social enterprises and charities. We have also seen growing interest in investing with purpose, which has prompted fund managers to create new and innovative products. This increase in products and capital has created more options for both investees and investors – helping capital to flow where it is most needed.” UKFundraising The Sun launches fund for small local charities A new £1m Sun Readers Fund will see £1m given away to smaller local charities over the coming year. The fund celebrates the newspaper’s 50th birthday. Donations will be made to small charities in six categories: Children and Young People, Health and Wellbeing, Veterans, Animals and the Environment, Emergency Heroes, and International Aid. UKFundraising COMMUNICATION Charity apologises for tweets about Conservative manifesto The National Autistic Society has apologised and deleted a series of tweets responding to the publication of the Conservative Party election manifesto. Some members argued that the comments endorsed Conservative policies. An open letter organised by Janine Booth, a member of the charity and a campaigner and trainer on autism rights who Civil Society notes is also a Labour Party campaigner, claimed that the tweets represented “unacceptable bias” and continued: “You have not only breached the responsibility of charities to not endorse, or seem to endorse, a political party, you have also deeply hurt and damaged the trust of many autistic people who have been harmed by Conservative policies whose interests you claim to serve.” Jane Harris, the director of external affairs at the National Autistic Society, said that a particular tweet aimed "to give our supporters more information about what was positive in this manifesto for autistic people and what wasn’t as good. Even though we have been tweeting about all the manifestos, we hadn’t given the same detail for all of them. This wasn’t right and we are very sorry for this mistake." Civil Society The top charity CEOs on social media Polly Neate, chief executive of Shelter, was named the top charity leader on social media at the Social CEO Awards in London last week. Other winners included Girish Manon of ActionAid UK, Tracey Bleakley of Hospice UK, Javed Khan of Barnardo’s and Mark Russell of The Children’s Society. Digital expert Matt Collins, who co-founded the event, said: "Our winners show how charities of all sizes, causes and budgets can champion excellence in digital. Leaders need to set the tone from the top by continuing to invest and grow their skills. This will help their teams and their charities go from strength to strength.” Charity Times STRATEGY Productivity challenges are an issue for most charity decision-makers A new study suggests that 87% of decision-makers in mid-sized charities find productivity a challenge that affects employees, fundraising, and the quality of service for beneficiaries. The research from the Access Group found that 84% of decision-makers in mid-sized charities think improving productivity would have a big impact on their organisation, and 82% believe an improvement would lead to a better quality of service for beneficiaries. Simon Baines, managing director of The Access Group’s not-for-profit software and service division, observed: “There is clear appetite for greater productivity . . . [and] There is a call to action in the findings of this report, particularly in terms of reviewing and assessing where effective changes can be made across an organisation and the positive impact this can have on its culture, its people and ultimately frontline services and beneficiaries.” UKFundraising VOLUNTEERING Ericsson wants to match its employees with charities Ericsson wants to match over 300 employees with charities that need skills-based volunteers. The telecommunications company's ‘Our Year of Volunteering’ in 2020 will see approximately 40-50 charities with whatCharity.com profiles presented to Ericsson staff. Tiia Sammallathi from whatCharity.com said: “This is a great opportunity for charities of all size and type to benefit from much needed and highly sought after expertise from a wide range of professional skill-sets. It is a democratic and fair process facilitated by our platform technology. Like our previous applications for grants and competitions, the process is simple and straightforward.” Roger Peacock, HR director at Ericsson, said: “During 2020 we’d like to encourage more staff to take part and create stronger links with charities that may benefit from our staff’s time and skills by making it easy for both parties to engage." Charity Today CAMPAIGNS Initiative looks to tackle lack of female representation Women in Sport has launched online research designed to transform the culture of sports workplaces and tackle the under-representation of women at an executive level. The UK based sport and equality charity said: “We believe that women should not only be on boards but also part of an inclusive workplace culture that encourages female leadership and embraces diversity and inclusion.” Women in Sport research shows that 38% of women working in sport have experienced discrimination in the workplace, 40% felt undervalued, and just 46% felt there was a fair and equal treatment of men and women in their organisation. This comes in the week a Telegraph investigation into ten international sports federations found that none had 40% female boards and only three had 25%. The Daily Telegraph OTHER £400m unclaimed on Transport for London Oyster cards The amount left unclaimed on Transport for London (TfL) Oyster cards has soared after the launch of contactless payments. There is £190.6m in unclaimed pay-as-you-go balances and £196.7m in unclaimed deposits, says TfL. Oyster card credit doesn't expire and people can apply for a refund whether the card is registered or not. TfL said it regularly publicises information about how to do so via posters, the Metro newspaper's travel page, the TfL website and via social media. Oyster cards can also be donated at charity boxes at Heathrow Airport, King's Cross and Liverpool Street, which since 2009 have raised £218k for the Railway Children charity. Shashi Verma, TfL's Chief Technology Officer, said, "We're committed to ensuring that our customers can get back the credit on their Oyster cards if that is what they want. This is why we regularly publish the amount of credit on cards and how people can obtain a refund if they wish." Financial Times BBC News ​​​​​​​​Back to Charity Times archive >>

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