Connecting to Linkedin

W1siziisijiwmtcvmdgvmtcvmdkvntevmdmvmzkwl1byby1szwnydwl0bwvudcatie1lzxqgdghlifrlyw0ucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilciymdawedm2nsmixv0

Claire Stradling

Back to Team

Claire Stradling

Manager of Charities and NFP

I head up our charity and not for profit division specialising in Finance and HR appointments. I manage a team as well as recruiting for senior level Finance Director, HRD, and CFO roles myself both on a contingency and a retained basis.

I have a large network of clients within the charity sector including NGOs, large international and national charities through to smaller charities and not for profit organisations.

I have over 25 years in recruitment experience and still love the industry. Having a keen interest in charities and charitable causes myself, the move to recruiting for the sector was a natural progression. I have been lucky enough to win many awards throughout my career for my performance which is because I believe I really listen to both our Clients and Candidates and really try to understand both’s unique requirements prior to matching.

Being born and bred in Birmingham, I am a massive Aston Villa fan and try and watch as many games as possible either live or on the TV. I am also a big music fan and go to lots of Gigs. I love a good book and spending time eating and enjoying wine with friends.

claire's latest roles

  • Project Leader, Pre-Appointment Scree...

    £58000 - £65000.00 per annum

    Have you led and successfully delivered on large/complex projects? Have these projects included delivering people/HR or safeguarding processes? Have you worked within a global/matrix management structure? Do...

    Read more...
  • Part time Finance Officer

    £22000.00 - £25000 per annum + pro rota

    Finance Officer - 2 days a week Islington Are you looking for part time work? 2 days a week Do you have previous book-keeping experience and strong data entry? Do you have strong systems Knowledge? Do you ha...

    Read more...
  • Finance Manager - 4 days a week

    £36000 - £38000.00 per annum

    Finance Manager - 4 days a week Islington - to £38,000 pa Are you looking for part time/reduced hours? Are you an experienced Book-keeper? Do you have charity Accounting experience? If so, read on. A health ...

    Read more...
Blank

What people say about Claire

Claire at Pro Group is a star! Her professionalism and reliability is clearly without parallel . . . I found her recruitment skills to be of a high calibre, and her approach was very refreshing and personal and it made me feel confident in her ability to place me in suitable role...


Firstly thank you so much for being one of the best recruitment consultants, I have dealt with during my search, you are few and far between. Your professional approach with honest and responsive conversation, is exactly what a candidate like...


Claire recently supported me in my quest in finding a new senior HR role. Throughout the experience she was proactive, listened to feedback and worked positively with both her client and myself to discuss, if a role was truly right for me as a person...


Read more...

Companies Claire has worked with

  • W1siziisijiwmtcvmdgvmtuvmtmvmzuvmzavmzu1l1bhcmtpbnnvbidzifvlifbyby1szwn1axrtzw50lnbuzyjdlfsiccisinrodw1iiiwimtu4edgyiyjdxq
  • Blank
  • Blank

Parkinson's UK is a charity who empower and support thousands of people living with the condition, inspire health and social care professionals to help drive better care and steer ground-breaking research to improve treatments and to find a cure.

Read more...

claire's articles

W1siziisijiwmtkvmdyvmtgvmtuvmzcvmtivnjm5l0noyxjpdhkgveltzxmglsbqcm8tumvjcnvpdg1lbnqgr3jvdxaucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci2mdb4mze1xhuwmdnlil1d

Charity Times - 18/06/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

DIGITAL Rate of digital change in charities is stalling The Charity Digital Skills Report 2019 suggests some charities are stalling or even going backwards in their integration of digital. More than half (52%) of charities who responded to the annual survey have no digital strategy, an increase from 2017 and 2018, when the figures were 50 per cent and 45 per cent respectively. Mims Davies, minister for sport and civil society and Margot James, minister for digital and the creative industries, said: “For the social sector to take full advantage of the opportunities that digital presents, it needs to be equipped with the right digital skills . . . There is no doubt that many charities are struggling to use digital tools strategically, which is impacting the growth of the sector." Zoe Amar, founder and director of Zoe Amar Digital, which carries out the annual survey, said: “It is reassuring that charities seem to be aware of the issues and where the gaps are... however, the slow pace of change and the decline of progress overall needs urgent attention.” Charity Digital News Third Force News Civil Society GOVERNANCE NCVO accuses Charity Commission NCVO is unhappy with the Charity Commission after the regulator’s chair wrote an opinion piece in The Times accusing charities of not meeting public expectations. Baroness Stowell wrote in the wake of the publication of the Commission’s inquiry report into Oxfam last week: "Over recent years, we’ve seen charities losing sight of what they stand for in pursuit of organisational advantage." In a letter to Charity Commission chief executive Helen Stephenson, NCVO chief executive Sir Stuart Etherington responded: "While claiming that it wants charity to thrive and inspire trust, [the Commission] is only talking about how ‘charity’ has failed," adding "there is a real risk that [these broad generalisations] will . . . . entrench public misconceptions and erode the public’s trust.” Separately, NCVO has announced its new chief executive. Karl Wilding will take over from Sir Stuart Etherington in the autumn. Sir Stuart announced his retirement earlier this year after 25 years with the umbrella body. Third Force News Civil Society FUNDRAISING Nearly a third of people have never donated to charity New YouGov research suggests that nearly three in 10 people in Britain (29%) have never donated money to charity. The most cited reason (32 per cent) for not donating was distrust of charity management, according to YouGov’s What motivates charitable giving report. Twenty-nine per cent said they had never donated because they couldn't afford to, and 28 per cent said they donated in other ways – for example by volunteering or giving goods to charity shops. Briony Gunston, director of not for profit research at YouGov said: “There is a significant portion of Brits who have never donated to charity . . . However, what is encouraging is that the most commonly cited reason for not donating, worrying that administrative costs consume too large a portion of funds, could be less of a barrier with more reassurance and education from charities.” Civil Society Scots law firms in Will Aid campaign McClure Solicitors, which has branches in Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Inverclyde, Rollos Law in Fife, and Miller Hendry in Dundee, Perth and Crieff, were among the top five UK fundraisers in the 2018 Will Aid campaign. The three firms raised a total of £47,634 between them for the scheme. McClure Solicitors is also the top donating firm in the UK for 2018, raising £24,885 last year. Andrew Roberston, managing director, said: “We are absolutely delighted with our efforts, and thrilled that we are not the only Scottish firm to be making a difference.” Bob Inch from Rollos Law added: “There has been a surge of interest in will writing in Scotland since the laws of succession were finally brought up to date in 2016 for the first time in 50 years.” Meanwhile, Caroline Fraser from Miller Hendry commented: “We are thrilled to have helped so many people in Scotland to prepare a will and to have helped the nine Will Aid charities in the process.” Journal Online WORKFORCE Report reveals impact of bullying A new report from the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations (ACEVO) and Centre for Mental Health details the impact of bullying in the charity workplace and makes recommendations to create safer systems, processes and cultures in the sector. More than half (58%) of respondents to the In Plain Sight study formally reported incidents of bullying but only 3% said that their complaint was dealt with satisfactorily. Vicky Browning, chief executive of ACEVO, said: “We believe that as charities we should be taking a lead on how we tackle bullying in order to create inclusive and supportive workplace cultures . . . [The responses to the study] have enabled us to begin the process of tackling an issue that is rarely talked about publicly in the charity sector. This research is an important first step and I am committed to making the recommendations in the report a reality." Third Force News RISK Charity is 'deeply sorry' for data breach A charity supporting transgender children and young people has apologised after thousands of emails were made public online. Mermaids UK said it was "deeply sorry" for what it called a "historical data breach" after it was reported by the Sunday Times. The newspaper claimed the correspondence included "intimate details", names and addresses, but the charity denies the allegations. It said there was "no evidence" the information had been retrieved by anyone other than the Sunday Times, or those contacted by the newspaper's journalist. Mermaids UK said the Information Commissioner's Office had been notified, and those affected had been contacted. The Charity Commission had also been notified, the charity said, and an independent investigation would be launched. BBC News Third Force News Civil Society NSPCC apologises for dropping first LGBTQ+ campaigner The NSPCC has said it cut ties with transgender activist Munroe Bergdorf because of statements she made on social media which breached the charity's safeguarding rules. Ms Bergdorf had been appointed by the NSPCC as Childline's "first LGBT+ campaigner" - but was dropped only days after the announcement. Ms Bergdorf accused the NSPCC of giving in to pressure from transphobes but the charity said its decision was unrelated to her being transgender. The NSPCC nevertheless apologised for the way it severed the relationship with Ms Bergdorf, saying it "shouldn't have cut ties in the way we did". Charity Update Civil Society BBC News AWARDS Scottish Charity Awards 2019 winners Edinburgh-based Drake Music Scotland, which helps over 1,000 disabled children and adults to play music, received the Charity of the Year Award at The Scottish Charity Awards on June 14th. The People’s Choice Award was won by Scotland's Charity Air Ambulance (SCAA) and Toni Giugliano of the Mental Health Foundation was named Leading Light for his work on suicide prevention. Laura Reid of Support in Mind Scotland won the Charity Champion Award. Move On was named Pioneering Project for its Family Food Service, and the Celebrating Communities award went to Give a Dog a Bone . . . and an animal a home. Marie Curie and MND Scotland received the Cracking Campaign Award for work on the Social Security in Scotland campaign. Third Force News OPERATIONAL ‘Looming crisis’ as care charities hand back contracts The Coalition of Care and Support Providers in Scotland has warned of a looming crisis, with a fifth of its member charities having handed back at least one contract to public authorities such as councils and health board partnerships in 2017, increasing to a third last year. The body commissioned a report from Strathclyde University to look into the rise. The report found that the failure to properly fund social care was driving charities to the brink, while problems also exist in staff recruitment and retention. Charities have criticised commissioners for being out of touch with service provision, lacking realistic expectations of what can be provided within a given budget, and the report warns that commissioning may conflict with the Scottish Government’s Fair Work policy. The Herald AUDIT Charity audit fees up £10m in four years The UK’s largest charities paid audit fees of £72.3m in 2017-18, a rise of £10.2m in just four years, according to a report produced by Charity Financials. The Charity Audit Spotlight 2019 report showed that 33% of the UK’s top 5,000 charity organisations were hit by an increase in fees while 44% saw no change in fees and 19% saw a decrease. The latest data also revealed that 43% of charities have not changed auditor within the last decade. haysmacintyre secured the highest number of new clients during the 2017-18 financial year (25) while Crowe UK netted the highest gain in fee income, worth £534k. Public Finance Accountancy Daily CAMPAIGNS Charity warns of social media addiction A report by Barnardo's warns that children aged five and under are at risk of developing an addiction to social media. The charity found that 60% of professionals who have experience of dealing with vulnerable children reported concerns about under-fives using social networks, with not only inappropriate content deemed a risk but the children’s communication skills jeopardised. Meanwhile, the impact on the mental health of under-18s of platforms such as Snapchat, Instagram and Twitter is “disturbing”, according to the report. It states: “Worries regarding addiction and the substitution of time spent with family for the use of social media were issues that were felt to cause problems related to mental health and emotional wellbeing in this age group”. Some 78% of 11 to 15-year-olds were found to have been exposed to inappropriate or harmful content online. The Independent Evening Standard The Guardian ‘Hidden Harms’ aims to find victims of modern slavery A new campaign has launched in London to find victims of “hidden crimes” such as modern slavery. The Hidden Harms Project, which is being run in seven languages by charity Crimestoppers, aims to increase reporting of potential offences. All information received will be directly passed to the Metropolitan Police Service, with the Modern Slavery Human Trafficking Unit at the National Crime Agency also involved. The campaign will be funded by a £90,000 donation from the City of London Corporation’s City Bridge Trust and the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime. Evening Standard More counselling needed for care experienced kids Who Cares Scotland has warned that problems accessing mental health support are putting care experienced children and young people in danger. The charity delivered a letter to Nicola Sturgeon on Friday highlighting the need for better access to counselling and mental health support, with an accompanying report, We don’t have to wait, calling for counselling services to be provided to all care experienced young people as a default, and for the deaths of young people in care to be recorded, with lessons learned from inquiries to be made public. The National Schools failing to support bereaved children Bereaved children are being let down by schools, a charity has warned, because there is no national bereavement policy for schools despite every classroom in the UK containing on average at least one child who has lost a parent or sibling. A study conducted for the charity by researchers at Cambridge University's Faculty of Education on behalf of Winston’s Wish found a "random approach" among schools, with students reporting receiving "only a little or no help at all" following bereavement. Although schools recognise bereavement as a high priority, teachers say they feel ill-equipped to offer support to bereaved children. The Guardian Back to Charity Times archive >>​​

Read more...
W1siziisijiwmtkvmdyvmtevmtyvmdyvmdivotmvq2hhcml0esbusw1lcyatifbyby1szwnydwl0bwvudcbhcm91cc5wbmcixsxbinailcj0ahvtyiisijywmhgzmtvcdtawm2uixv0

Charity Times - 11/06/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

REGULATION Oxfam findings released by Charity Commission The Charity Commission has published a critical report on Oxfam GB, with aspects of the charity’s past record on safeguarding allegedly amounting to mismanagement. The charity was found to have repeatedly fallen below expected standards, tolerated poor behaviour, and failed to meet safeguarding goals. The organisation’s overall approach to safeguarding both in the past and currently was deemed unsatisfactory. Helen Stephenson, Chief Executive of the Charity Commission, commented: “The charity’s leadership may have been well-intentioned. But our report demonstrates that good intentions have limited value when they are not matched with resources, robust systems and processes that are implemented on the ground, and more importantly, an organisational culture that prioritises keeping people safe.” Sky News Fundraising Third Sector Gov.uk Morgan review: Charity accounting needs radical overhaul Professor Gareth Morgan, chair of the Charity SORP review panel, has said that charity reporting and accounting needs to be overhauled to provide more transparency and accountability on financials and to simplify the reporting process for the smallest charities. The nine-month investigation was instigated following criticism of the members of the Charity SORP committee, who are responsible for writing the accounting rules for the charity sector. One of the main criticisms was the committee's slowness to reflect wider changes to FRS 102 accounting rules, as well as failing to strengthen the weak controls over anti-money laundering and cross-border financial oversight of charities. The governance review was undertaken by an oversight panel comprising a representative from each of the four charity regulators and an observer representative nominated by the Financial Reporting Council. Accountancy Daily Gov.uk OSCR Third Sector Foreign Affairs Labour’s civil society strategy broadly welcomed The charity sector has broadly welcomed Labour’s newly-published 14-page civil society strategy, entitled From "Paternalism to Participation," which includes pledges to increase grant funding for small charities and measures to increase diversity among charity leaders. Roberta Fusco, director of policy and engagement at the Charity Finance Group, championed the focus on improving access to digital services in the sector and plans to review the Gift Aid Small Donations Scheme. Jay Kennedy, director of policy and research at the Directory of Social Change, praised the pledge to involve charities more in determining how the government’s Shared Prosperity Fund will be allocated to replace current EU funding, along with plans to use funding from dormant financial assets to support community organisations and projects, while Sir John Low, chief executive of the Charities Aid Foundation, cautioned: “This strategy has an ambitious scope but it could go further and details are needed to flesh out what the party would do in practice.” Civil Society Audit committees and financial reporting Don Bawtree of BDO highlights that the Financial Reporting Council and the ICAEW have issued a guide on issues audit committees might need to consider in relation to financial reporting. He says the guidance, which he describes as “straightforward and practical”, can be applied to charity trustees. Third Sector Regulator warns against taxing private schools In a submission to Holyrood’s local government committee, the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator has advised against forcing private schools to pay business rates as it risks forcing them to cease operating as a charitable institutions, which would have a detrimental impact on communities due to lost access to valuable shared facilities and state pupils missing out on classes. The Scottish Government is considering implementing the recommendations of the Barclay review into business rates, allowing councils to tax independent schools in future. The Times Scotland Charity Commission probes Jarrow's St Clare's Hospice St Clare's Hospice’ collapse into insolvency is being reviewed by the Charity Commission, which is "assessing information, including a serious incident report submitted by the charity”. This follows South Tyneside Council's overview and scrutiny committee chairman Rob Dix agreeing last month to write to the Commission to request an assessment of the events leading up to the collapse of the hospice in Jarrow, South Tyneside. BBC News Shields Gazette Viva Palestina report says charity ‘may have delivered no aid’ A damning new report from the Charity Commission has found that humanitarian charity Viva Palestina, fronted by former MP George Galloway may not have delivered any aid to Palestine. A decade of probes into the organisation has found that while “significant cash donations were received by the charity via direct bank transfer”, there was “no evidence that these donated funds had been spent on their intended purpose”. The charity was also found to have failed to maintain records of donated assets. The Independent Civil Society The Guardian FUNDRAISING Few BAME fundraisers, report says Just 9% of fundraisers belong to a Black, Asian, minority ethnic (BAME) background, according to a new report released by the Institute of Fundraising, which also shows that only 3% have a disability. The “Who’s Not in the Room” research aimed to give a snapshot of diversity in fundraising and was based on survey data provided by hundreds of respondents. London-based charities had 11% of fundraisers from an ethnic minority background, compared to a 40.2% total BAME population, while the West Midlands and the North West have 13% and 12% BAME fundraisers respectively. Fundraising Third Sector Scots’ generosity to charity dips Scotland's generosity to charity has dipped, according to the Charities Aid Foundation’s (CAF) annual Scotland Giving report, prompting calls for charities to increase public engagement. The amount donated by Scottish people to charity in 2018 fell by nearly 30% (£349m) to £851m last year, down from a high of £1.2bn in 2017. Though Scots are still 12 percentage points higher than the UK average of 64% when it comes to donating to charity, Susan Pinkney, the CAF's head of research, underlined scope for charities to use the figures as a catalyst for greater engagement, adding: "This can also act as an opportunity to reassure them that their favourite charities are worth their time, effort and hard-earned money." Herald Scotland Fundraising platform adds WhatsApp functionality Not-for-profit digital matching platform The Good Exchange has integrated online chat network WhatsApp into its services. The online fundraising platform says the added functionality will enable people to easier share fundraising projects to drive awareness and increase visibility. Charity Digital News Young Fundraiser of the Year announced by IoF Emma Powell has won this year’s Institute of Fundraising Young Fundraiser of the Year Award. She has fundraised for cancer charities since her twin sister died of the illness aged 11, raising more than £130,000 for The Chartwell Children’s Cancer Trust, Rays of Sunshine, Demelza Hospice and CLIC Sargent. Fundraising Fundraisers register for free virtual conference The Resource Alliance community of fundraisers and changemakers is about to welcome thousands of people who have signed up to participate in the Fundraising Online 2019 free online conference. This year’s event begins on June 12, with keynote speakers including Ann Mei Chang, author of Lean Impact: How to Innovate for Radically Greater Social Good. Fundraising DIGITAL Report urges charities to embrace digital Charities must embrace digital fundraising to remain relevant, according to the new "Future Charities" report by Kivo, Manifesto Digital and Massive consultancies, which focuses on six factors which are needed to address the technological, social, demographic and economic challenges facing the industry - redefining purpose, building confidence, securing the right people, measuring meaningfully, collaborating actively, and looking beyond the sector. While digital challenges are clear, many respondents to the survey spoke of the positive opportunities which new technologies present, with 75% indicating that they believed that changes in technology could affect their workplace and organisation in a positive way. Charity Digital News Fundraising Rafful raises £150k Manchester start-up Rafful, which enable organisations to raise money for charities by partnering with influential people and leveraging their social media followings to spread the word, has raised £150,000 of equity investment to build a dedicated platform. Charities including MIND, Cancer Research UK, The British Red Cross and Oxfam have already signed up to use the portal. Business Cloud Tyneside mobile donations startup raises £300k Newcastle-based tech startup Donr, a platform to allow people to donate to charities using their mobile phones, has secured a £300,000 equity investment from the Northstar Ventures-managed North East Innovation Fund. Donr is already used by over 800 charities, including national organisations like The Big Issue Foundation and The Trussell Trust, as well as local, North East charities such as Sage Gateshead and Tyneside Cinema. Insider Media GOVERNANCE Government releases public sector AI guidance The UK Government has published comprehensive new guidance on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in the public sector. The report, led by Office for Artificial Intelligence (OAI) and the Government Digital Service (GDS), with The Alan Turing Institute’s public policy programme contributing, asserts that uses for AI in the public sector must be balanced with ethical, fairness and safety considerations. Charity Digital News Ex-Downing Street adviser’s trust to give up its schools Floreat Education Academies Trust, which was set up by a former government minister, has announced that both its schools will join GLF Schools. The trust was founded by James O'Shaughnessy, a former 10 Downing Street aide to David Cameron who later became a health minister in the House of Lords. Floreat had previously looked at merging with another trust in 2016, because of the financial challenges of running a small academy trust of primary schools. A spokesperson said Floreat’s parent charity would not be wound up, and would instead “use its remaining resources to support the schools as they grow to full capacity”. TES LEGAL Charity questions spy kid policy The Home Office faces a legal challenge from Just for Kids Law, with the charity saying police are putting children at risk by using them as spies to investigate gangs and dangerous criminals. The charity will tell the High Court that the activity lacks safeguards and contravenes human rights laws. The Times High Court orders winding up of housing charity Thrift Urban Housing Limited is to be wound up after the High Court approved a petition from the Charity Commission. Judge Jones ruled: “I would have viewed this petition from a different angle had completely new trustee/directors been appointed […] This has not happened, but that approach adds to the reasons I rely upon when deciding it is just and equitable to wind up the charity”. Meanwhile, Amy Spiller, head of investigations team at the Commission, remarked: “Organisations that enjoy the privilege of charitable status should be run with probity and respect.” Civil Society INITIATIVES Secondary teachers to get mental health training Secondary teachers are to receive training on how to recognise the warning signs for depression and anxiety as part of a government-funded mental health drive. Over 1,800 schools and colleges will receive the training, as part of the latest phase of the mental health awareness training. The new phase of training will take place in 130 locations across England and will be delivered by mental health charity the Anna Freud Centre. The sessions will also address common mental health problems that teachers are likely to confront in schools. “It’s about ensuring that you have a robust mental health and wellbeing policy in place, and giving teachers skills to go back to their settings and set that up,” commented Davina Metters, head of programming in mental health in the school's team at the Anna Freud Centre. TES Fundraising staff can be protected from sexual harassment Stephanie Smith, director of income generation and marketing at Chestnut Tree House and St Barnabas House hospices in Sussex, explores how protocols to protect nurses from harassment at hospices can be applied to workers in the fundraising sector. She cites the reporting methods and safeguards nurses seek from their employer and through the Royal College of Nursing as inspiration for how fundraisers could be better protected. Civil Society Tags used to prove addicts capable parents Substance misuse charity Change Grow Live, in partnership with Blackburn with Darwen Council, has been offering free, voluntary use of alcohol-tracking ankle tags to vulnerable addicts who have had their children removed by social services due to substance misuse and chaotic lifestyles. The devices allow them to prove that they are capable of caring for their children, and key workers now say the scheme should be rolled out across the UK. The Sunday Telegraph Starbucks to trial reusable cups at Gatwick Starbucks is launching a reusable coffee cup trial at its Gatwick Airport branch, in partnership with the environmental charity Hubbub. The trial will provide customers at Starbucks with the option to borrow a free reusable cup which they can drop off at a designated point before boarding their flight. The aim is to put 2,000 reusable Starbucks cups in circulation in the south terminal in an attempt to cut waste and tackle the "throwaway" culture. Last year Starbucks became the first UK coffee chain to introduce a 5p charge on paper cups to encourage reuse. Trewin Restorick, chief executive and co-founder of Hubbub, said: "We want to find out whether people will get on board with reusing cups if we make it easy and convenient. The airport is the ideal environment to trial a reusable cup scheme as it has the potential to reduce large volumes of paper cup waste." The Guardian Royal Mail rolls out digital missing people alerts Charity Missing People has partnered with Royal Mail to deliver "missing people alerts" via postal workers' handheld digital devices. Since the initiative was launched, 120,000 postal workers in the UK have received alerts that a missing person could be in their area and Royal Mail’s Director of Public Affairs & Policy, David Gold, said: "Families waiting for news have told us how much of a comfort and encouragement it is to know that postal workers are helping in the search for their loved ones." Charity Digital News CAMPAIGNS Young carers miss out on education Half of young carers drop out of education, a new study by Barnardo's has revealed. Of the country's estimated 800,000 carers under 17, 10% say the pressure of looking after loved ones meant they had to quit secondary school. A quarter said that their role stopped them going to university while a further 15% said being a carer led to them dropping out of further or higher education. Some 67% said the role made them feel tired in lessons; 73% took time off learning, while a third missed school most weeks. Emma James from Barnardo's said: "These are forgotten children who are being isolated from their peers as they struggle with school and their own mental health." Sunday Express Nurseries in deprived areas 'face closure over funding gap' A shortfall in government funding means some nurseries in England's poorest areas are facing closure, a charity has said. A report by the Early Years Alliance (EYA) found 17% of childcare providers surveyed in the most deprived areas of the country "anticipate closure in the next twelve months". The survey of more than 350 nurseries and childminders found 43% of providers had been forced to cut back on learning resources and 19% said they had lowered the quality of food they gave to children." How much bigger does the early years funding shortfall have to grow before the government acts?", Neil Leitch, chief executive of the EYA, asked. BBC News Charity concerned by lack of parent-infant mental health teams A new report claims families where young children are at risk of developing mental health problems because their parents are struggling face a “shocking” lack of help from the NHS. The charity Parent Infant Partnership (PIP) UK found that only a handful of health service bodies across the UK had a specialist parent-infant relationship team to help children in households where there was domestic violence, substance misuse or a parent who was mentally ill. PIP has established there are just 27 specialist teams across more than 200 local NHS bodies in the UK. An in-depth study of children’s mental health published by NHS Digital last November revealed that one in 18 children of pre-school age in England had at least one mental health disorder such as anxiety or depression. The Guardian OTHER What’s in a middle name? A blue plaque marking the location of a school in which the founder of Save the Children taught has been revealed to be using the wrong name. The sign, honouring charity founder Eglantyne Jebb, was unveiled in Marlborough in 1996 by Princess Anne, but a researcher from Marlborough News spotted that the full name given in the sign – Eglantyne Mary Jebb – was incorrect, as Ms Jebb never had a middle name. A replacement plaque has now been installed, part-funded by Marlborough News. BBC News Back to Charity Times archive >>​​

Read more...
W1siziisijiwmtkvmdyvmduvmdcvndavmjivndyzl0noyxjpdhkgveltzxmglsbqcm8tumvjcnvpdg1lbnqgr3jvdxaucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci2mdb4mze1xhuwmdnlil1d

Charity Times - 04/06/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

GOVERNANCE New hotline for whistleblowers The Charity Commission has launched a hotline for whistleblowers to report concerns to the regulator. Helen Stephenson, the regulator's chief executive, said: “We want to make it easier for charity workers and volunteers to draw serious concerns about their charity to our attention, particularly where the charity’s trustees and senior management team aren’t addressing them.” The hotline project is operated independently by the whistleblowing charity Protect. The number is a free and confidential advice line, available on: 0800 055 7214. Meanwhile, the regulator's ‘Report serious wrongdoing at a charity as a worker or volunteer’ guidance informs people about what sort of wrongdoing can be reported, and how this can be done. UKFundraising Civil Society Governance performance review disappoints Charities scored an average of 52% in a new measure of charity compliance with the Governance Code, according to audit firm RSM. A total of 85 charities with incomes over £5m were scored out of 100 according to evidence of adoption of and compliance with the Code. Nick Sladden, RSM’s head of charities and the author of the report, observed: “Demonstrating effective governance is . . . absolutely key to ensuring that the sector can continue to rely on public generosity, interest and support. However, our research shows that while there are examples of best practice, average scores are disappointing and some charities have a lot of room for improvement." UKFundraising Cybersecurity toolkit for charity boards The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has launched its new Board Toolkit – a manual for charities to develop their cybersecurity strategies and create the right dialogue with their trustee boards. Ciaran Martin, NCSC chief executive, said: “The Board Toolkit encourages essential discussions between trustee boards and technical experts within the UK’s larger charities to help charities ensure they are putting in places the measures needed to help prevent [malicious cyber] incidents . . . The NCSC has also produced a guide for smaller charities to provide them with practical steps to take to protect themselves from the most common cyber-crimes.” Almost two-thirds (65%) of high-income charities recorded a cybersecurity incident last year. Charity Digital News COMMUNICATION Sector needs a ‘cultural upheaval' Baroness Tina Stowell, chair of the Charity Commission, has said the sector typically doesn't reach its potential and organisations must rethink how they deliver their objectives. Speaking at the leadership forum Charity2020 last week, Baroness Stowell also warned the sector about the risks of complacency. She said: “I am convinced that, if they are to continue to thrive, and retain their place at the heart of our society, charities will need to demonstrate that they are more than organisations that have good aims,” adding “To achieve this future requires nothing short of cultural upheaval in the sector, and it’s requiring us as regulator to do our work in new and very different, difficult ways.” Civil Society FUNDRAISING Bottle deposit scheme could raise over £1bn The Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE) says more than £1bn could be raised for charities if a deposit-return scheme for cans and bottles was introduced in the UK. The countryside charity is urging the government to introduce such a deposit-return scheme following survey findings which suggest that 20% of people would donate 20p deposits they’d paid on drinks cans and bottles all the time, and 19% would do so most of the time. Samantha Harding, litter programme director at CPRE, said: “Not only would the introduction of a UK-wide deposit return system put a stop to most of the environmental damage caused by drinks containers and boost recycling rates in excess of 90%, it could also provide much-needed funding for good causes across the country." Civil Society INVESTMENT Agency to promote impact investing is launched The Impact Investing Institute is a new body which seeks to promote impact investing in the UK. The institute, which is supported by Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, the Department for International Development and the City of London Corporation, and private firms and foundations, is an amalgamation of the UK National Advisory Board on Impact Investing (UK NAB) and the Implementation Taskforce on Growing a Culture of Social Impact Investing. Sir Harvey McGrath, chair of UK NAB and Big Society Capital, and Elizabeth Corley, chair of the Implementation Taskforce and vice-chair of Allianz Global Investors, will lead the new body and the process of hiring a chief executive has begun. Corley said: “The institute will play a significant role in ensuring the UK continues to stay at the forefront of innovation in impact investing, enabling UK savers to invest in line with their values and have increased ownership over the social outcomes that their money generates.” Civil Society DIGITAL Free accelerator program for charity apps Mobile app marketing consultancy Yodel Mobile is offering charities the opportunity to improve their app marketing through a free accelerator programme that will provide expertise on acquiring, engaging and keeping high-value customers and users. Charity Digital News notes that Yodel Mobile last year partnered with Breast Cancer Care App to ensure that the app reached the users who most benefited from it. Charity Digital News WORKFORCE Amnesty bosses leave after ‘toxic’ workplace report Amnesty International is to lose five of its seven senior leadership team, with all seven having offered to resign, following an independent report's finding of a "toxic" workplace culture at the charity. The review, which surveyed 475 workers, found a prevalence of manager bullying, multiple accounts of discrimination based on race, gender and sexual orientation, and an "us versus them" dynamic between employees and management. The review was ordered after two employees killed themselves last year, with one employee explicitly referring to stress and overwork in a note. The Economist says the report about the charity’s work environment illustrates how managers need to seriously consider the views of staff or risk natural work pressures developing into toxic stresses that infect the organisation. The report found that nearly 40% of the human rights charity’s employees developed mental or physical health issues as a result of their work , and this was exacerbated by their belief in the charity’s mission. Amy Edmondson of Harvard Business School suggests the ideal organisation creates an atmosphere of “psychological safety,” where managers learn the art of “respectful inquiry” so workers can speak their minds to attentive bosses. BBC News The Economist Campaign to get non-grads into the sector Charities are being urged to stop excluding people who don't have a degree from applying for jobs. David Burgess, director at Apollo Fundraising, has launched the #NonGraduatesWelcome campaign because he believes a requirement for a degree-level education can be a barrier to diversity. He said: “We want organisations to consider what they are really looking for when asking for a degree-level qualification and to be more transparent about the skills and experience they require." The campaign has support from John Thompson, director of fundraising & recruitment services at Changing Business, and Lizzi Hollis, head of corporate engagement and partnerships at Richard House Children’s Hospice. Civil Society Prisoners given day-release to boost employability Thousands more prisoners across the UK may be allowed to leave prison to work and help charities on day release, under new rules aimed to boost employment amongst those leaving prison. Justice Secretary David Gauke says: "Broadening access to training and work opportunities is a vital part of our strategy to steer offenders away from a life of crime," with those able to find employment after serving sentences statistically less likely to commit further offences. The Times The Guardian TAX Don't claim VAT relief on social media adverts, says HMRC HM Revenue and Customs says charities must pay a standard VAT rate for social media advertising. A zero-rating doesn't apply to advertising services targeted at selected individuals or groups, the tax authority said. But Richard Bray, vice chair of the Charity Tax Group, said this was not necessarily an “open and shut” case. “The Charity Tax Group is in discussions with HMRC over the issue and we would encourage anyone contacted by HMRC to get in contact with their professional adviser,” he said. Civil Society CAMPAIGNS Millions 'lack access' to parks and green spaces Millions of people in Great Britain do not have access to a nearby park or green space, a study suggests. The Green Space Index by Fields in Trust found that more than 2.5m people lived more than a 10-minute walk from the nearest area. The charity notes that there is no statutory protection for green spaces in Britain, with about 6% of parks and green spaces protected, and calls for the Index to be used as an “early warning system as we should be doing more to protect”. BBC News LEGAL Gift Aid fraudster spent more than £76k cruising the world A charity treasurer who tried to steal more than £330,000 in a Gift Aid repayment fraud has been jailed for three years. Dale Hicks of Stoke-on-Trent abused his position at a Staffordshire based ex-offenders charity by lodging a string of false claims, an HMRC investigation found. Hicks spent at least £76,000 of the cash on cruises and other holidays. Press Release Accountancy Daily Third Sector Back to Charity Times archive >>​​

Read more...
W1siziisijiwmtkvmduvmjgvmtuvntevntyvotuzl0noyxjpdhkgveltzxmglsbqcm8tumvjcnvpdg1lbnqgr3jvdxaucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci2mdb4mze1xhuwmdnlil1d

Charity Times - 28/05/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING More now happy to leave a gift to charity A new poll suggests a growing number of people say they are happy to leave a gift to charity in their will. The survey from Remember A Charity found that 40% of respondents now say they would be happy to leave such a gift, up from 35% in 2008. Rob Cope, director of Remember A Charity, said: “We’ve seen a real shift in attitudes in recent years with the public indicating that they are more open to the concept of legacy giving and this is a positive sign for the years ahead... This poll suggests not only that the public is more willing to leave a gift, but that they have a clearer understanding of legacy giving and think people should be free to do what they want with their estates." UKFundraising ClearCourse acquires digital fundraising company Software and services provider ClearCourse has bought mobile and digital fundraising platform instaGiv. InstaGiv, the partner of more 300 UK charities, including Macmillan Cancer Support, Tearfund and Amnesty International, and which to date has helped raise over £7.5m, offers a range of mobile and digital solutions for the third sector as well as its core offering of text donation services. ClearCourse CEO Gerry Gualtieri said "[This] strategic acquisition will . . . allow our existing companies to target the fundraising and charity sector with a combined complementary solution incorporating instaGiv’s capabilities.” Charity Digital News I spy... a charity bike ride Spies from security agency GCHQ have taken part in a covert bike ride for charity. A 100-strong cycling team cycled nearly 80 miles from Bletchley Park to Cheltenham to mark the agency's centenary. The six-hour challenge is expected to raise around £30,000, which will be divided between several chosen charities. Half of the money raised will be donated to Cancer Research UK, with the rest split between Heads Together, the Royal British Legion and Code Club. BBC News COMMUNICATION Full programme for Small Charity Week 2019 is announced The programme for Small Charity Week 2019, which takes place from 17th-22nd June, has been announced by the Foundation for Social Improvement. This year's headline sponsor is Aviva. Monday's 'I Love Small Charities Day' celebrates why people love small charities; Tuesday will see as many as 100 charities access free bespoke advice from expert volunteers at the Big Advice Day event at City Hall in London; small charities will be able to meet government ministers and policymakers in Westminster on Wednesday's Policy Day; Thursday is dedicated to fundraising; the winners of the Small Charity Big Impact Awards are announced on Friday; and Saturday's 'Celebration Day' will see small charities stage their own events to showcase their work and raise local awareness. UKFundraising Texting platform enables charities to engage with supporters in real-time UKFundraising reports on Activate - a texting platform that lets charities talk directly with supporters in real-time. The app has already been widely tested in the US and the People’s Vote campaign has now used Activate in the UK. Patrick Heneghan from People’s Vote said: “Activate has been a valuable tool in our campaign. We reached thousands of supporters within minutes and had an expert team at the ready to engage in conversation and drive action. We used Activate to recruit volunteers, get people out to events and raise significant funds." UKFundraising RISK Charity fraud hits £2.5bn A report from accountancy firm Crowe and the University of Portsmouth's Professor Jim Gee shows that fraudsters stole a record £2.5bn from UK charities last year – up £200m on the year before. The statistics, revealed in BBC One series Britain's Secret Charity Cheats, suggest that around a quarter of the £10bn a year donated by the British public is lost to fraud. “We have amazing charities right across the country, but every year billions of pounds are stolen from good causes,” says reporter Kevin Duala as he opens the series, adding “Charity fraud is a growing crime, so we’re putting the spotlight on the crooks and cheats pocketing your donations.” Daily Mail Civil Society WORKFORCE Charity worker dismissed after Farage tweet A charity worker has lost her job after posting a tweet advocating an acid attack on Nigel Farage. The Brexit Party leader had been doused in a milkshake in a widely-reported incident earlier. The tweet by Ruth Townsley, head of measurement and policy at Bristol-based wellbeing charity Happy City, read: "Great that milkshakes have become a thing when it comes to the racists in our midst. I’d prefer acid but milkshakes will do for now I guess.” A statement on the charity’s website said: “We do not in any way agree with the contents of these tweets which contradicted all of our strongly held values. We believe all politicians have a right to have their voices heard, and condemn violence of any sort at any level of society. Ruth Townsley no longer works with Happy City.” Civil Society Christian Aid moves HR processes to the cloud Christian Aid is using human capital management (HCM) company Ceridian’s Dayforce mobile app to improve its people operations in 35 countries. The app gives individuals the ability to choose the device used to monitor tasks and freedom from being rooted to a physical location. “We wanted a solution that would help simplify our organisation’s increasingly complex HR practices and compliance requirements,” said Nicola Williams, Head of People, UK and Ireland, Christian Aid. Charity Digital News CAMPAIGNS School music curriculum is out of touch, says charity School music lessons should be overhauled to include grime, electronic music and hip-hop, according to a charity, following research which found that more inclusive music-making improved attendance among pupils at risk of exclusion. A study by Youth Music concluded that many schools failed to include current musical genres and has recommended that lessons should focus on "Stormzy rather than Mozart." The number of students who performed better in maths and English also rose during the programme, which gave students the opportunity to learn and create music they are interested in. The charity is now urging the Department for Education to adopt a new model of music in schools, with the focus being less on attainment and more on creative music-making. Matt Griffiths, CEO of Youth Music, said: “Our research has cemented our view that music in schools has the power to help young people with some of the big issues facing them today – mental health, isolation and social inequality.” The Daily Telegraph The Guardian The Independent The Sun Fifth of girls face bullying over periods One in five girls and young women is teased or bullied over their periods, with many suffering in silence, according to a study. The poll of 1,000 UK girls aged between 14 and 21 by the charity Plan International UK reveals 20% have experienced teasing or bullying around their periods - with only half telling anyone about it – which researchers said was a sign of the “unacceptable stigma” they face. Some 67% said abuse was mainly occurring in schools, with 66% saying they have missed classes because of their period. The research comes as minister for women and equalities Penny Mordaunt announced the charity, alongside Procter & Gamble, as co-chair of its period poverty taskforce to tackle stigma and boost education around periods. The Guardian The Independent Daily Mail The Sun​ Cyberbullying 'not as prevalent' as offline bullying Alex Holmes, deputy CEO of anti-bullying charity The Diana Award, has warned that the treatment of cyberbullying by politicians and the media is unbalanced because online bullying is less significant than its face-to-face equivalent. Although cyberbullying could be extremely hurtful, Mr Holmes said that the children he had encountered did not see it as their biggest obstacle. "They are telling us that bullying that's happening offline is a bigger problem than what's happening online," he said, adding "I think that shouldn't be forgotten." He also warned that concentrating too much on cyberbullying risked ignoring the far larger issue of bullying in schools. "It's very easy to paint the internet as this really scary place and I think sometimes we forget that school for a lot of young people is just as scary. That by now is something that we should have a lot more control on." Sky News Girls denied ‘boys’’ sports The Girlguiding charity is set to launch a campaign for girls to have the same choices in sports as boys, after it found a strong demand among girls for the ability to engage in pursuits such as rugby and football. A 2016 survey of girl guides found that just 43% said they had the same options as boys at school. And in a 2017 survey, 39% said rugby was offered only to boys, while 27% said football was offered only to boys. The Times The Daily Telegraph Charity looks to lease Glasgow woodlands Glasgow City Council is to consider whether to hand over woodland areas at Prospecthill Circus to the Urban Roots Initiative, a community-led charitable organisation, for a 20-year period. Council director Richard Brown said the initiative “works to increase social inclusion, education and encourage environmental involvement through gardening and growing, with healthy eating as an additional outcome.” Glasgow Evening Times INTERNATIONAL Kissing cows for charity Civil Society reports on #KuhKussChallenge. It's a viral craze that has taken off in parts of Europe in a similar way to #IceBucketChallenge. People are being urged to kiss a cow for charity - but the Austrian government's agriculture minister isn't a fan and has warned about people being killed by cows. Marnus Flatz, the chief executive of Castl AG, the app behind the challenge, responded by saying that walking is, statistically, a more dangerous pursuit. Civil Society Back to Charity Times archive >>​

Read more...
W1siziisijiwmtkvmduvmjivmdcvndavmtavmjm0l0noyxjpdhkgveltzxmglsbqcm8tumvjcnvpdg1lbnqgr3jvdxaucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci2mdb4mze1xhuwmdnlil1d

Charity Times - 21/05/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING ACO day of action will highlight members’ work The Association of Charitable Organisations (ACO) has announced a national day of action on October 16th to highlight the support its member charities provide to thousands of people. The One Day Changes Lives campaign will highlight the work done by member charities including Macmillan Cancer Support, Retail Trust, and Vetlife. ACO chief executive Dominic Fox said: “It is important that we highlight the organisations providing ongoing support for its beneficiaries and the help they can give to people who really need it . . . We hope this day will highlight how sometimes small acts of kindness can make a big difference to people’s lives and also encourage people who may need support to get in touch and see how our charity members can help them.” UKFundraising Oxfam simplifies digital fundraising approach Oxfam is simplifying its digital fundraising approach as the charity seeks to combat a decline in fundraising income. Nicola Tallett, Oxfam’s director of engagement, said of a strategy to make fundraising efforts more audience-friendly: "Supporters were being put off by the complexity of the Oxfam offer, sometimes receiving mixed messages and communications about campaigns, shopping and giving . . . So we changed our strategy to become audience-centric, to ensure that it made sense from a supporter’s perspective. This has resulted in greater engagement, especially with digital.” The Oxfam App, the launched of Oxfam's own lottery and its engagement with the People’s Postcode Lottery, and the Oxfam Online Shop all signal the new strategy, Tallett said. Charity Digital News More than £100m raised from dormant accounts in 2018 The Reclaim Fund's annual report and accounts for 2018 show that over £100m was raised from dormant accounts in the year and, as of the beginning of January, £620m was potentially available to distribute to good causes. The organisation collects money from bank accounts that have been inactive for more than 15 years. Meanwhile, Legacy Foresight reports that legacy income increased by 1.8% in the year up to March 2019 - although growth has slowed year-on-year since 2013. Civil Society GOVERNANCE Scottish charities report more than 300 serious incidents Charities in Scotland have reported over 300 serious incidents to the Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR) in the three years since a system of self-reporting was introduced. Jude Turbyne, the regulator's head of engagement, said the figures were indicative of awareness of the system increasing among charities. "The regime is still fairly new, and it is still developing. We are pleased with the progress we are making," she said. ButThird Force News notes the figures have led to debate about whether organisations should be required by law to report concerns. Alastair Keatinge, head of charities at Lindsays solicitors, says charities should be under legal obligation to report notifiable events. "The current set-up leaves the door open for trustees, who are perhaps embarrassed or worried about the reputational damage to their organisation, to try to keep the issue in-house," he said. Third Force News BBC News STRATEGY CFG warns on no-deal Brexit The chief executive of the Charity Finance Group (CFG) has told attendees at the organisation’s annual conference that a no-deal Brexit would be ruinous for the sector. Caron Bradshaw said that the only aspect of Brexit that the CFG had taken a position on "is that a WTO or a no-deal Brexit would be catastrophic for the sector." She observed that the areas that had voted most heavily for Brexit in 2016 were those which had a “gap for charitable support”. She said: “What that says to me is there is huge need being unmet and we need to find out where those places are and take our services into those places.” Civil Society DIGITAL 360Giving announces a new strategy to improve data use Online grant tracking platform 360Giving has launched a strategy which aims to improve the use of data amongst charities. It includes the development of resources such as free technical advice, workshops and peer networks in a bid to encourage open data sharing, improve data quality, increase data use and data literacy, and help shared learning. “For charitable giving to strategically address society’s problems we need to build on [recent] momentum. That’s why we are applying the learning and infrastructure we have developed over the past three years to enable more grantmakers to use the data in their day to day work, and for others to demonstrate its relevance,” said Fran Perrin, founder and chair of 360Giving. Charity Digital News WORKFORCE Charities told to set 'clear targets' on diversity A panel discussion on diversity in the sector has heard a call for the setting of "clear targets" and accountability to accelerate progress. The audience for the discussion at the Charity Finance Group’s annual conference heard Cordelia Osewa-Ediae, senior consultant at Green Park, say: “Umbrella organisations like the NCVO need to step up and actually be the guardians going forward.” She also noted the importance of inclusion to ethnic minority charity staff - who would leave if they did not feel “part of the organisation.” Civil Society COMMUNICATION Charity unveils new logo to mark 175 years YMCA Scotland has rebranded to mark its 175th anniversary this year. As part of the rebranding process, the charity engaged with young people and staff using focus groups to shape the new brand. YMCA Scotland chief executive Kerry Reilly said of the thinking behind the charity's new logo: “One of the challenges we faced was that our brand was very fragmented across the country. Local YMCAs used widely different logos and colours. This often made them look like small local charities when they are, in fact, part of a national and international movement.” Third Force News CAMPAIGNS PE losing out on curriculum time Curriculum time devoted to physical education has been cut more than almost any subject, according to new analysis. The government’s school workforce data shows that there were 282,200 hours of PE taught in 2017 – the most recent year for which figures are available – down from 333,800 hours in 2010, meaning that 51,600 hours of PE have been lost in just seven years. According to the Youth Sport Trust, the only subject which has had its curriculum time cut more since 2012 is ICT and the charity is calling for more time in the curriculum for PE in every school. The Daily Telegraph TES Scottish schools get new sex education guidance Charities have welcomed the publication of new guidelines to help teachers in Scotland talk "confidently and sensitively" to young people about relationships and consent. Described as the country’s first national guidance on issues such as consent, it has been drawn up to help teachers, youth workers and other professionals who might have to speak to children aged 11 and upwards about relationships. Cara Spence, chief executive of LGBT Youth Scotland, said " it's great to see that the messages are inclusive of all sexual orientations and gender identities.” Kathryn Dawson, sexual violence prevention coordinator at Rape Crisis Scotland, said that "Young people are ready to talk and it's so important to provide safe spaces for them to learn about consensual and healthy relationships.” TES Co-op donates to anti-knife campaign Co-op has pledged a multi-million-pound investment to anti-knife crime charity Steel Warriors. The charity melts down knives taken off the streets and turns them into outdoor gym equipment. Co-op chief executive Steve Murrells said: “This will give access to free outdoor fitness equipment to those youngsters who can't afford gyms with costly fees. It's what we should do as a responsible retailer.” Daily Mail Back to Charity Times archive >>​

Read more...
W1siziisijiwmtkvmduvmtuvmdcvmzcvmjivotk1l0noyxjpdhkgveltzxmglsbqcm8tumvjcnvpdg1lbnqgr3jvdxaucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci2mdb4mze1xhuwmdnlil1d

Charity Times - 14/05/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING Charities are optimistic A report from the Institute of Fundraising (IoF) in partnership with professional services firm PwC suggests charities are optimistic despite ongoing economic uncertainty. The Fundraising for Impact report looks at fundraising income and costs, how charities are investing in fundraising, key fundraising challenges, and issues around fundraising in the future. The authors of the report say charities are using innovation and new approaches to ensure future success amid growing costs around compliance, workforce and fundraising activity. Peter Lewis, chief executive of the IoF, said: “While increased costs and economic uncertainty lead to a challenging environment, I’m pleased to see that more charities are putting in place strong foundations and building blocks that will deliver for their causes into the future.” Third Force News UKFundraising Rich donated £3.75bn to charities in the last 12 months The Sunday Times' Giving List - produced in partnership with the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) - shows £3.75bn has been donated to charity by the UK’s richest individuals in the last year. The total amount donated was a 0.5% increase on last year, when £3.207bn was given to charitable causes, although the number of individuals donating more than 1% of their wealth has fallen from 86 last year to 72. “I think the negative publicity around the third sector has affected the general public more than major donors, who tend to believe passionately in the causes to which they give huge sums of money and are often able to have a much closer relationship with the charity,” said Joanna Walker, head of private clients at CAF. Civil Society Weather blamed for drop in Sport Relief donations Comic Relief has blamed "exceptionally harsh weather conditions affecting people getting out and about to fundraise" and a televised match involving the England football team for a £30m drop in Sport Relief donations. “During the Sport Relief Night of TV itself the England Football Team were also playing a live international on another TV channel which took some viewers away from Sport Relief,” Liz Warner, the charity’s chief executive, said about the March 2018 event. Civil Society Property company launches fund for local charities Keighley-headquartered real estate developer Skipton Properties has launched a dedicated charity fund that will award £1,000 each month to support worthy causes in the areas where it builds homes. The family-run firm has announced that the initiative will run for the next 12 months, from July 2019 to July 2020, to charities or community initiatives in Haworth, Glusburn, Sabden, Harden, Cowpe, Barnoldswick and Shipley. Yorkshire Post GOVERNANCE Second inquiry launched into Hindu Community Society The Charity Commission has opened a second statutory inquiry into Hindu Community Society, a charity which exists to promote charitable purpose for the benefit of the Tamil community in Coventry, particularly by advancing the Hindu religion. The Commission has serious regulatory concerns regarding the management and governance of the charity. Despite being previously included in a class inquiry in 2017 for failing to file its financial accounts, the charity’s trustees have failed for the sixth consecutive year to submit the charity’s annual financial information on time. GOV.UK Civil Society Charity Update WORKFORCE Supreme Court will hear landmark sleep-in hearing in February An appeal against the landmark sleep-in ruling in favour of Mencap will be heard by the Supreme Court in February next year. The Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake case relates to social care workers on "sleep-in shifts" who provide overnight on-call support to patients but are expected to sleep through the majority of the shift. Employers have typically paid flat-rate fees at rates below the minimum wage but the legality of this arrangement was challenged at employment tribunal hearings by former Mencap employee Clare Tomlinson-Blake. Civil Society DIGITAL Charities miss out on digital investment platforms Bridgit Richards, director of product and marketing at Charities Aid Foundation, says many charities are missing out on digital innovations when it comes to their investments. A 2018 study revealed that the top 5,000 UK charities (in terms of new assets, income or expenditure) are holding £16.7bn in deposits - but this isn’t being actively managed by investment professionals on behalf of the charities. She says all kinds of charities must be able to access to reliable digital investment platforms to actively manage their finances. Charity Digital News AWARDS Charity Awards 2019 shortlist is announced The shortlist for the Charity Awards 2019 has been announced. Ten category winners, and the Overall Award for Excellence and the Daniel Phelan Award for Outstanding Achievement, will be announced at a black-tie dinner held in the grounds of the Tower of London on June 5th. Sir John Low, chief executive of the Charities Aid Foundation (CAF), said: “As a long-term sponsor of the Charity Awards, we at the Charities Aid Foundation are proud to be associated with the premier national event that celebrates and showcases the best of what British charities do year in year out." Civil Society CAMPAIGNS Criticism for Breast Cancer Now campaign A campaign by Breast Cancer Now has been criticised for being “ill-informed” and “rude” by True Cancer Bodies, a group of cancer patients who are campaigning to raise awareness of the trauma involved in cancer treatments. The use of slogans including "good things come in twos" and "two is stronger than one" met with an angry response from some in the cancer community who were mindful of those who have lost breasts to the disease. Fiona Hazell, the charity's director of communications and engagement, said: “In hindsight, we realise it was not delivered quite right. The intention was absolutely about creating a campaign which was about friendship. It has caused upset which we are extremely sorry for . . . We always try to ensure that our campaigns are carried out with the utmost sensitivity to those who have been affected, or who are currently affected by breast cancer and we are very sorry for the offence caused by some of our campaign content." BBC News Civil Society Stars join Scottish charity's homelessness campaign Dame Helen Mirren and Will Smith are participating in a Scottish charity’s campaign to end homelessness. They will read bedtime stories at a global sleep-out of a projected 50,000 people on December 7th to raise awareness of homeless and displaced people. The World's Big Sleep Out, created by Social Bite, takes place simultaneously in London, New York, Edinburgh, Chicago, New Delhi, Newcastle, Dublin, Belfast, Madrid, Barcelona, Brussels, Cardiff and Santiago. "The World's Big Sleep Out campaign will play an important role in shining the political spotlight on the issues of homelessness and displacement whist raising considerable funds to make a big difference,” said Dame Helen. Third Force News The volunteers helping tackle problem plastic The Independent profiles volunteers across the UK who are collecting plastic waste that councils are not able to recycle, and passing it on to private recycling firm TerraCycle in exchange for charitable donations. The paper speaks to one volunteer, George, who has raised £17,000 for charity by collecting plastic over the last six years. Campaigners question why the government has not been able to improve recycling rates if a private firm has been able to stay profitable by recycling plastic not collected by local authorities. The Independent Universities should use ‘privilege flags’ to aid diversity The leader of a charity that raises aspiration among underprivileged children has called upon universities to introduce "privilege flags" so admissions tutors know when students are from affluent backgrounds. Dr Rachel Carr, chief executive of IntoUniversity, said this would allow institutions to see who has had a better start in life. "Lots of universities already use participation flags to identify students," she said. "How about we also use 'privilege flags' so we can see the students who already have a much better start and a much better likelihood of success." The Sunday Telegraph Mental health spending varies wildly across regions Analysis of 42 NHS regions by the charity Mind suggests there is nearly a two-fold difference in mental health spending across England. It found that Surrey Heartlands spent the least - £124 per person last year - compared with South Yorkshire and Bassetlaw, which spent more than £220. It said the differences were huge and would affect the quality of care but, despite the variation, spending was still rising everywhere. BBC News The Times INTERNATIONAL Irish charity aims to make Cork ‘the best place to be LGBT’ Cork LGBT charity Gay Project has launched two policy papers to support its Making Cork the Best Place to be LGBT project. The charity’s chair, Colette Finn, said a number of changes were needed at local and national level to support LGBT+ people, including “hate crime legislation to prevent attacks, a ban on bogus conversion therapy and full and equal family rights,” along with local projects and issues like a sexual health service, an equality hub to act as a community centre, greater visibility and awareness, and for an “LGBT lens to be applied to all citywide policy-making and strategy formation.” Irish Examiner Back to Charity Times archive >>​

Read more...
W1siziisijiwmtkvmduvmdcvmtuvndyvndmvoduxl0noyxjpdhkgveltzxmglsbqcm8tumvjcnvpdg1lbnqgr3jvdxaucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci2mdb4mze1xhuwmdnlil1d

Charity Times - 07/05/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING Untapped public sector potential of crowdfunding A new report from the University of Leeds titled Financing for Society: Assessing the suitability of crowdfunding for the public sector, has found that investment-based crowdfunding can provide local authorities with a competitively-priced source of capital and improved civic engagement. The project was led by University of Leeds academics Dr Mark Davis, Associate Professor of Sociology and founder of The Bauman Institute, and Research Fellow Dr Laura Cartwright. Dr Davis noted: “At a time when public sector finances are under increasing pressure, crowdfunding – still mistakenly seen as being just another form of charitable giving – has the potential to offer this radical alternative via an investment-based business model that generates social, environmental and economic returns.” University of Leeds National Fundraising Awards 2019 unveils shortlist This year’s National Fundraising Awards shortlist includes Action for Children, British Heart Foundation, Greenpeace UK and CLIC Sargent among others. Chair of the judging panel, Howard Lake, remarked: “Our judging panel received an amazing standard of entries this year. With such strong candidates, it was as challenging as ever asking the judging panel to come up with the top five entries in order for each category results in some strong debates, yet several judges told me just how much they enjoyed the experience.” The winners will be announced on Monday 1 July 2019 at The Brewery, London. Fundraising Wild at Heart doubles text giving total Animal welfare charity Wild at Heart Foundation is using text donation to help stray dogs worldwide. The charity aims to compassionately reduce worldwide stray dog populations using neutering programmes, awareness campaigns and education initiatives and has partnered with the Humane Society of the United States to try and neuter 20,000 Puerto Rican dogs by this year. Marketing and Fundraising Manager Eleanor Brampton said of their current campaign: “The real hook is it allows people to donate there and then on Instagram, where you can’t link to a donation form directly, so it saves that kind of convoluted route. It works on Instagram especially because people are quite lazy when looking through their social media and are tempted to keep scrolling through, so this offers a quick and easy Call to Action.” Charity Digital News GOVERNANCE Children with Cancer UK boss calls for more women in senior positions Dhivya O'Connor, chief executive of Children with Cancer UK, has told Charity Financemagazine that more women are needed in top positions in the charity sector. She remarked: “Being a female CEO in a sector where we still don’t see enough women in the top job is something that personally I’m very proud of. And, for me, it’s important to also be a role model for other women in the sector.” She also noted that “All charities have a responsibility ultimately to their donors to let them know exactly where their money has gone, and what the impact of that funding has been.” Civil Society Scope publishes details of disabled employees' experiences A "pioneering" report about the experiences of Scope’s disabled employees and the mental health and wellbeing of all its staff has been published, and the charity has urged others to do the same. A new voluntary reporting framework was introduced by the government last November, but Scope is the first organisation to share details of its workforce's experiences. The report stated: “If we are to close the gap between disabled and non-disabled people’s employment opportunities, all employers will need to step up and commit to shifting workplace policy and attitudes.” Civil Society REGULATION Charity failed to file accounts for five years Charity Chabad Lubavitch UK failed to file its annual accounts for five years, with the Charity Commission concluding that there was “mismanagement in the administration”. Amy Spiller, head of investigations team at the Charity Commission, stated: “This inquiry highlighted poor management and controls in the administration of the charity. The public rightly expect trustees to take their responsibilities seriously, so that charities can deliver on their mission and purpose effectively, and inspire trust.” She noted that transparency has now improved, with the public “better able to see how the charity manages its finances.” Civil Society Asthma sufferers go hungry to afford inhalers A study by Asthma UK claims that around 805,000 patients with the condition have been forced to cut back on food in order to be able to pay for their essential medication, while 21% of those surveyed said they had to cut back on essential bills to fund their treatment. The charity’s Stop Unfair Asthma Prescription Charges campaign is urging ministers to make medication free for sufferers, as it is for many other long-term illnesses. Charges for NHS prescriptions have risen by 26% to £9 since 2010. Daily Mirror Yorkshire Post Scottish Charity Regulator issues accounts guidance The Scottish Charity Regulator (OSCR)’s guidance on the legal requirements for preparing charity accounts has been updated to help charity trustees better understand what they are required to do. OSCR's head of professional advice and intelligence Laura Anderson stated: “Getting accounting right is a vital task for charities as the annual report and accounts that each charity is required to prepare plays a huge part in public trust.” She went on: “This guidance gives an overview of the law and provides essential information regarding charities' accounts.” Third Force News DIGITAL Cybercrime alert issued to trustees Charity trustees have been provided with information on how to report cybercrime by the Charity Commission, "amid ongoing prevalent threats, particularly around phishing emails". The Commission recommends that charities should report fraud to them as a serious incident, stating: “We require prompt, full and frank disclosure of incidents. Serious incident reporting helps us to assess the volume and impact of incidents within charities, and to understand the risks facing the sector as a whole”. This comes as a government report, the Cyber Security Breaches Survey 2019, reveals that one-fifth of charities experienced compromised online security in 2018. Civil Society CAMPAIGNS RSPB releases bird song single The RSPB has released a song called Let Nature Sing which reached number 11 in the UK midweek charts. The organisation is hoping it will break into the top 10 later today with the track, which featured various threatened and endangered birds and is intended to raise awareness of the challenges facing them and other wildlife. Rebecca Munro, director of fundraising and communications at RSPB, said that the political climate has encouraged the charity to be “bolder and braver”, noting that Brexit represents “a once in a lifetime opportunity… so if we can’t make nature laws strong now we are not going to get another opportunity for a very long time”. Civil Society Campaign encourages everyday walking A new digital street campaign called ‘Walk this May’ is intended to raise awareness of the street environment by getting people to walk more. Celebrating National Walking Month, the campaign is organised by walking campaign group Living Streets, which will be working with InLinkUK and showcasing images and messages of participants. Tanya Braun, Head of Policy and Communications at Living Streets remarked: “We support InLink UK’s commitment to get more people walking. Where they have reduced pavement clutter – giving valuable space back to local communities – we applaud their efforts to make it easier to walk on Britain’s streets.” Charity Digital News Mencap teams up with 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon Disability charity Mencap has been named by Virgin Money London Marathon as its official Charity of the Year for the 2020 event. Mencap’s campaign Here I Am aims to start a movement of change toward greater inclusion for people with learning disabilities. Jan Tregelles, the organisation’s chief executive, remarked: “We are absolutely delighted to be Charity of the Year for the 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon”, while Hugh Brasher, event director for the Marathon, commented: “We passionately believe in sport for all and greater inclusion for people with a learning disability.” Civil Society Back to Charity Times archive >>​

Read more...
W1siziisijiwmtkvmdqvmzavmtyvmdcvmzmvmzkxl0noyxjpdhkgveltzxmglsbqcm8tumvjcnvpdg1lbnqgr3jvdxaucg5nil0swyjwiiwidgh1bwiilci2mdb4mze1xhuwmdnlil1d

Charity Times - 30/04/2019

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING Local charities lose out due to limits on lottery sales A report from charity researchers nfpSynergy suggests local charities lose out on vital funding due to outdated limits on lottery sales. Their report says that although the value in funding applications by small charities to local funding trusts supported by the People’s Postcode Lottery has increased from £5.9m in 2012 to £58.3m, only three in 10 applications could be awarded funding over the last two years due to sales limits for society lotteries. Clara Govier, managing director of the People’s Postcode Lottery, said: “The government can unlock millions of pounds in extra funding at the stroke of pen by raising the current caps on charity lottery fundraising, which are holding back organisations from improving the lives of people up and down the country.” More than 70 charity leaders have now sent a joint letter to Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright which calls on him to pursue proposed changes to charity lottery laws. They have reiterated their support for a government proposal set out last year to increase the sales limit for charity lotteries to £100m per year. The charity leaders write in their letter: “The existing £10m limit is causing excessive bureaucracy, additional administration costs, and in some instances is reducing the funds available to supported charities by significant amounts, which benefits no one." ITV News UKFundraising Third Force News Charity Today The charities perceived to be most in need of legacies A new league table ranks charities perceived to be most in need of legacies by supporters. The fastmap Legacy Premier League 2018/2019 compiled by fastmap in association with Freestyle Marketing is topped by Dogs Trust, National Trust, and Cats Protection. The ranking of 14 charities also featured, in order of appearance in the table after the top three: RNLI, Guide Dogs for the Blind, NSPCC, Alzheimer's Society, British Heart Foundation, Hospice, Cancer Research UK, RSPCA, Macmillan Cancer Support, Royal British Legion, and Marie Curie. David Cole, Managing Director of fastmap, said: "This legacy research highlights that the need of a gift from wills significantly differs at a brand level. Future investigations from these brands might be needed to understand why they are perceived as less (or more) in need of a gift compared to others.” UKFundraising London Marathon runners raise at least £48.5m Nearly 14,000 runners in the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon have raised more £20m on JustGiving for good causes. It's the largest amount raised via JustGiving for any London Marathon. Runners have so far raised more than £48.5m in total from the event. There was a record number of finishers in this year's race, with 42,906 starters and 42,549 completing the 26.2 mile course. So far, £3m has been raised for Dementia Revolution, the official charity campaign of the 2019 event. Keith Williams, general manager and head of UK at JustGiving said: “We are proud to say that JustGiving has now helped 200,000 London Marathon participants raise £300m over the last 19 years, putting world-class digital technology to work and support the efforts of every runner taking on the ultimate physical challenge.” UKFundraising Civil Society GOVERNANCE Mining company delayed probe into charity partner, claims Deloitte Audit firm Deloitte said it made three requests for mining company Ferrexpo to open an investigation into its charity partner, Blooming Land, which provides medical and social services in Ukraine, before resigning as the miner’s auditor last week. Deloitte said the company delayed the investigation despite requests first being made in October. The firm was therefore unable to ascertain whether links between chief executive Kostyantin Zhevago and the charity were improper. An independent review by Herbert Smith Freehills and BDO commenced in February but did not end before Ferrexpo's annual report on April 23rd. City AM Evening Standard The Times Financial Times Daily Mail The Times The Guardian Financial Times TAX Private schools defend charitable status The Independent Schools Council has defended the fee-paying sector, claiming it saves taxpayers billions of pounds a year. The headteachers’ group used its annual report to show private schools save the government more than £20bn by educating pupils who would otherwise need state places and by providing employment, community facilities and tax contributions. The Times The Daily Telegraph RETAIL Mystery charity shop donation could raise £15k A charity shop in Tunbridge Wells has received a collection of highly valuable designer clothes and accessories originally worth about £50,000 from a mystery donor. The anonymous donation to the town’s Mind shop includes items from Prada, Gucci and Mulberry will be sold at a significant discount but the charity hopes to raise £15,000 from them. The Daily Telegraph Daily Express DIGITAL Tech Trust has been bridging charities and digital since 2001 Charity Digital News employs an infographic to take a look at how Tech Trust has helped 38,000 UK charities save more than £250m through its donated software platform for charities, in partnership with tech companies including Microsoft, IBM, Amazon Web Services and Google. Charity Digital News CAMPAIGNS Charities question compensation cuts Victim Support, Liberty, Barnardo's and Rape Crisis have hit out over a cut in the number of people receiving payments from the criminal injuries compensation scheme. Figures show that the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority awarded £280m to 39,706 people hurt in attacks in 2010/11, compared to the 16,781 victims who received £154m in compensation in 2017/18. With the Ministry of Justice holding a consultation on making changes to the scheme, the charities have called for an increase in the authority's budget. A Ministry of Justice spokesman said: "Our ongoing review of the criminal injuries compensation scheme has one simple aim: to make sure it better supports victims." The Guardian The Times Charities urge better support for vulnerable teens The Children’s Society and 12 other children’s charities are calling for a cross-governmental body to develop a coordinated response for vulnerable 16- and 17-year-olds who are in need – but not taken into care – because of domestic violence, mental health, substance misuse, going missing from home, sexual and other forms of exploitation. They warn that the health, safety and futures of the vulnerable teens are being damaged by the gap between child and adult services. Support for children in need stops at 18, but as few as 3% of vulnerable teenagers are referred to adult services. Councils are under no obligation to instigate a plan to help children transition to adulthood. The Guardian 90% of schoolgirls missing recommended activity Women in Sport has launched national recommendations to reframe sport for teenage girls, following recent studies that demonstrate a gender gap in both activity levels and attitudes. In a new report, the charity has found that only one in 10 teenage schoolgirls are meeting daily activity recommendations and less than half say they enjoy physical education. More than three-quarters feel they “do not belong” in sport, while almost 40% said school work means they do not have time for sport. Meanwhile, the i looks at a scheme run by Football Beyond Borders (FBB), an initiative that uses the power of football as an educational tool to inspire young people who might be underachieving. The charity now runs 46 school programmes across the UK, and its participants are involved in 31% fewer incidents of bad behaviour and achieve a marked improvement in attitude to learning. The Daily Telegraph More men are needed in early years A new project from a charity aims to get more men into early years settings. The initiative is being led by the Fatherhood Institute and is a response to recommendations from a 14-member group to address the challenge of recruiting and retaining men in the sector. Children and families minister Nadhim Zahawi, who announced a £30,000 grant to support the project, said: "We’re supporting the Fatherhood Institute to encourage men from all walks of life into early years careers, to give children the best start in life and be a part of this important and rewarding sector." Dr Jeremy Davies, head of communications at the Fatherhood Institute, said: "Old-fashioned attitudes about caring and education being 'women’s work' have no place in modern Britain . . . We want careers advisers and employers to reach out and support men into early years work – including dads and other men with experience of looking after children, and those who have the interest and skills to build on." Nursery World OTHER Devon is best for quality of life Devon has the best quality of life of anywhere in England and Wales, according to wellbeing charity Happy City. It analysed official data to make its conclusion, taking into account more than 60 indicators covering equality, local conditions and sustainability. Four other councils also performed well in all three categories, Bath and North East Somerset and Dorset in the West Country, alongside Kingston upon Thames and Bexley in London. The charity’s Thriving Places Index shows Derby comes bottom overall, with Hull also performing badly. The Guardian Back to Charity Times archive >>​

Read more...