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Claire Stradling

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Claire Stradling

Manager of Charities and NFP

I head up our charity and not for profit division specialising in Finance and HR appointments. I manage a team as well as recruiting for senior level Finance Director, HRD, and CFO roles myself both on a contingency and a retained basis.

I have a large network of clients within the charity sector including NGOs, large international and national charities through to smaller charities and not for profit organisations.

I have over 25 years in recruitment experience and still love the industry. Having a keen interest in charities and charitable causes myself, the move to recruiting for the sector was a natural progression. I have been lucky enough to win many awards throughout my career for my performance which is because I believe I really listen to both our Clients and Candidates and really try to understand both’s unique requirements prior to matching.

Being born and bred in Birmingham, I am a massive Aston Villa fan and try and watch as many games as possible either live or on the TV. I am also a big music fan and go to lots of Gigs. I love a good book and spending time eating and enjoying wine with friends.

claire's latest roles

  • Finance Officer - 6 month FTC

    Up to £28000 per annum + 6 month FTC

    Finance Officer - 6 months FTC - Stratford, Essex To undertake efficient and accurate day to day record keeping for accounts payable, cash management, sales invoicing and staff expenses and to support the de...

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  • Senior Finance Assistant

    £30000 - £35000 per annum

    Senior Finance Assistant - London Do you have front office experience in either banking, financial services or corporate finance Do you comprehensive experience working in the finance department of a company...

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  • Senior Finance Assistant

    £45000 - £50000 per annum

    Do you have experience in Trade finance experience within FS or banking? Does this include cash management in the finance market? Do you have trade finance experience? If so, a well known global leader will ...

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What people say about Claire

Claire at Pro Group is a star! Her professionalism and reliability is clearly without parallel . . . I found her recruitment skills to be of a high calibre, and her approach was very refreshing and personal and it made me feel confident in her ability to place me in suitable role...


Firstly thank you so much for being one of the best recruitment consultants, I have dealt with during my search, you are few and far between. Your professional approach with honest and responsive conversation, is exactly what a candidate like...


Claire recently supported me in my quest in finding a new senior HR role. Throughout the experience she was proactive, listened to feedback and worked positively with both her client and myself to discuss, if a role was truly right for me as a person...


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Companies Claire has worked with

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Parkinson's UK is a charity who empower and support thousands of people living with the condition, inspire health and social care professionals to help drive better care and steer ground-breaking research to improve treatments and to find a cure.

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claire's articles

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Charity Times - 20/11/18

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING Implementation period urged for fundraising code proposals Charity representative bodies including NCVO, the Directory of Social Change, and the Institute of Fundraising have all agreed in principle with the proposed changes to the Code of Fundraising Practice from the Fundraising Regulator but say they want more time to adjust. The Fundraising Regulator announced its proposed changes to the Code of Fundraising Practice in September, with the aim of making the code easier to use and understand, as well as more easily accessible for the public. A spokeswoman for the regulator said: “It is important that the Code of Fundraising Practice is a tool that fundraisers and organisations can use confidently to create a positive donor experience and the feedback." Civil Society Fundraising Regulator appoints new chair The Labour peer Toby Harris, Lord Harris of Haringey, has been appointed as the next chair of the Fundraising Regulator. He begins his role on January1st 2019 when current chair Lord Grade’s tenure comes to an end. Lord Harris said: “I am excited to have been appointed Chair of the Fundraising Regulator. I very much admire the vital work the team at the regulator have tirelessly been carrying out over the past few years and am looking forward to supporting the Board and its staff in ensuring that fundraising is carried out transparently and ethically.” UKFundraising Civil Society Third Sector Computer power being turned into charitable donations Charity Digital News examines how Give Bytes, a crowdfunding platform, is enabling people to donate to charities by turning unused power from their computers into cryptocurrency. The platform uses blockchain technology to ‘cryptomine’ the computers of those wanting to donate. Give Bytes said that while each donation is likely to be small, a considerable amount of money can be raised through the method. Give Bytes also reveals that 77% of people are keen to give money to charities, but a third are unable to donate regularly due to financial reasons. Charity Digital News WORKFORCE Call for improved sector equality, diversity and inclusivity A movement urging fundraisers and their allies to work together to make fundraising a more equal, diverse and inclusive profession has been launched by the Institute of Fundraising (IoF). The Change Collective is inspired by conversations the IoF has held over the last nine months that have underscored the representation of BAME, LGBT+ and disabled people and men throughout the profession, with unequal progression for women fundraisers. A new ‘Manifesto for Change’ developed by an expert advisory panel on equality, diversity and inclusion chaired by Sufina Ahmad, and adopted by the IoF Board of Trustees, details the guiding objectives and activities of the movement. Fundraising.co.uk RISK Charities report 137 data breaches to ICO The latest figures revealed by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) show that charities reported 137 data security incidents to the regulator in the second quarter of 2018-19. The majority of charity incidents (88) involved unlawful disclosure of data with the majority of other incidents (50) relating to various security issues. A total of 4,056 data security incidents were reported to the ICO for the second quarter across all sectors. Charities accounted for just 3.3% of all reported data breaches. The ICO also revealed that the charity sector was responsible for reporting 36 separate cyber incidents in the second quarter of 2018/19. Civil Society STRATEGY Government announces £1m digital skills fund for charities The Government has announced £1m in funding to support programmes helping charities improve their digital skills. Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright, announcing the fund, said the Government wants “charitable organisations to thrive in the digital age and are committed to helping them get the most out of technology, which can act as an enormous force for good.” The programme, he said, will give charity leaders “more opportunities to enhance skills and boost employee confidence while creating a greater and more positive impact on people and their communities.” The fund supports the Government’s recently published Civil Society Strategy, which outlined plans to help charities build their digital capabilities to benefit service-users and wider society. Gov.uk Inquiry urges radical reform A two-year study has concluded that civil society organisations risk irrelevance unless they undertake radical reform to ensure they are fit for future challenges. A report fromCivil Society Futures, an independent inquiry led by Julia Unwin, details major changes which need to happen in four areas. The Story of Our Times: shifting power, bridging divides, transforming society report recommends that power needs to be shifted to involve everyone in decision-making; organisations must become more accountable to their communities; civil society must improve connections within and between communities; and organisations need to build trust by making sure ensure they act in accord with their values. Civil Society Third Sector GOVERNANCE Charities investigated over Gift Aid claims The Charity Commission is investigating two connected charities over “financial irregularities” and concerns about Gift Aid schemes. The regulator said it had opened a class statutory inquiry into Islamic charities Idaara Maarif-E-Islam and The Voice of Truth in October last year. The inquiry is seeking to establish whether the close relationship has been in the best interest of the charities and if any resulting conflicts of interest have been adequately managed by the trustees. Civil Society Gov.uk Charity Commission steps in over architect’s will The Charity Commission has intervened in a dispute over the £67m estate of architect Dame Zaha Hadid after Patrik Schumacher, principal at the architect's practice she founded, applied to the High Court in London to remove his co-executors. The charity regulator said it will be “engaging with the relevant parties to assess their handling of this matter and to ensure that charitable funds are not at risk." The Times CAMPAIGNS Charity warns of workplace discrimination for cancer patients A survey of 1,500 British cancer patients has revealed a fifth face discrimination when they return to work after treatment. Macmillan Cancer Support said many bosses had misconceptions about employees with a cancer diagnosis and the charity added that in the last two years there had been a 74% increase in the number of calls to its helpline from cancer patients facing issues at work. The charity warned employers that they could be breaking the law if they did not make reasonable adjustments for workers with cancer. Liz Egan, of Macmillan's Working Through Cancer initiative, said: "We know how important it is to many people to work during cancer treatment, or return to employment afterwards, and this is entirely possible with the right support.” The Guardian Stem professionals sought for Teach First pilot The charity Teach First, which recruits new graduates into deprived secondary schools, has created a new scheme which aims to lure bankers, engineers and computer programmers in their 30s and 40s, “disenchanted” with their jobs, to switch careers into teaching. Teach First struggles to persuade new recruits to leave big cities for impoverished coastal areas and former manufacturing towns, and has specifically formulated the new Time to Teach programme for this older group, who will be encouraged to move out of cities. Teach First CEO Russell Hobby said he believes “career switchers are more likely to want to settle outside the cities”. About 30 career-switchers with Stem degrees will be recruited for the pilot, which starts next spring. It is hoped that this will rise to 500 in the next few years. The Times The Times Charity calls for more blood pressure checks The British Heart Foundation has suggested that commuters should have their blood pressure tested at convenient places such as supermarkets and football grounds across the country. It comes as new research suggests improved diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure could prevent 11,500 heart attacks, strokes and other cases of heart and circulatory disease every year. The Daily Telegraph The Guardian Daily Express Charity calls for waiting targets for mental health patients Rethink Mental Illness has warned that people with severe mental health problems are being forced to wait longer for NHS help than those with mild depression. The charity urged officials to introduce NHS waiting targets for mental health problems, including a two-week maximum wait for those suffering from psychosis. Experts warned that those suffering devastating mental health problems were being left to reach crisis point before they got any help. The Sunday Telegraph OTHER Unlikely donations revealed The Charities Aid Foundation (CAF) has shared some of the strangest items donated to charities around the UK this year, with a prosthetic leg, a sheep’s head and a live ferret being notable examples. With Giving Tuesday (November 27th) approaching, the CAF’s director of communications, Ben Russell, said: “As unusual as these donations are, they show the many ways people can support the charities they care about.” “Giving Tuesday is the ideal moment to do something for a good cause. After the sales of Black Friday this is an ideal chance to give something back, whether it is giving something to a charity shop, organising a charity bake sale at work, pledging to volunteer or just helping out someone round the corner,” he added. Third Force News

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Charity Times - 13/11/18

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING Charities face £10m a year hit from probate fee rethink Charities warn that a rise in probate fees will cost them at least £10m a year as the increased charges take up larger parts of estates and thus mean smaller donations. Matthew Lagden, of the Institute of Legacy Management, said the losses come at a time when many charities are struggling to meet growing demand for their services.Ministers took the decision to increase probate fees by 3,771% despite the protests of more than 800 charities, trade bodies and businesses. Last week the Ministry of Justice announced that probate fees would rise from a set fee of £215 - £155 if a solicitor is employed - to more than £6,000 for the largest estates. Of the 831 organisations that responded to a consultation on the fee changes, 810 disagreed with the proposals, typically branding them “excessive” and “unjustified.” Charitable bequests currently generate almost £3bn a year for the UK’s charity sector. Mr Lagden said he was “deeply concerned” by the reforms, stating that “The new fees would significantly reduce income for charities reliant on legacy gifts.” Daily Mail The Guardian The Sunday Times The Sunday Times The Sunday Times UKFundraising Over 2,000 charities are supporting Giving Tuesday More than Over 2,000 charities, including Barnardo’s, Marie Curie, Cancer Research UK, Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity and the RSPCA, have signed up to be Giving Tuesday partners for this year’s event, which takes place on November 27th. Ben Russell, Director of Communications at the Charities Aid Foundation, said: “This is a milestone for Giving Tuesday in the UK; five years in and the campaign just gets bigger and better every year, helping more and more people to give to the causes that they cherish." UKFundraising £20 donation limit for new text giving platform Mobile fundraising firm donr has launched Text Giving, a new text giving platform with a maximum donation limit of £20 that offers charities a choice of any keyword when donating, and no set-up or monthly fee. "Most text giving platforms are either prohibitively expensive or don’t have the features that charities have come to expect . . . We wanted to ensure that small to medium charities were also able to easily access the latest evolution of text giving,” said donr CEO Chris Newell. Charity Digital News Free online guide to help Gift Aid claims A free online guide to help charities complete their Gift Aid donations schedule has been launched by HM Revenue and Customs. The guide include information about how to reclaim tax on eligible donations, use of correct software, completion of the schedule, and filling in the form. Civil Society COMMUNICATION Top charity chief executives on social media The top charity leaders on social media were named at last week's Social CEO awards in London. Kate Collins, chief executive of Teenage Cancer Trust, came out on top. She was named as the overall winner of the Best CEO on Social Media award, while Helen Stokes-Lampard, CEO of Royal College of General Practitioners, was awarded both Best Trustee on Social Media and Best Digital Trustee. Best Leader on Social Media was Caroline Price of BEAT; Best Rising Star on Social Media was Nikki Bell of BHF; Julie Dodd of Parkinson’s UK was named Best Digital Leader; and Best Digital Champion was Liz Green of YouthLink Scotland. Charity Times Civil Society FINANCE Charities urged to improve property knowledge A new report suggests a third of charities are experiencing difficulty accessing core funding for their property, with a growing number claiming that property issues are a barrier to the delivery of charitable objectives. Over 23% of respondents to the report published by the Ethical Property Foundation said they spend more than a fifth of their annual expenditure on property costs and over 15% said they spend a quarter of their income on property. The report urges charities to improve their own knowledge of the properties they manage, noting: “There is widespread weakness in charities’ own capacity to manage property effectively. This starts at the top with a lack of knowledge among trustees and a misunderstanding of their responsibilities . . . The message for trustees is to institute regular property reports and risk assessments, assigning a key person with property responsibilities, whether paid or voluntary.” Civil Society STRATEGY RSA chief urges charities to collaborate Matthew Taylor, the chief executive of the Royal Society of Arts, has told theAssociation of Charitable Foundations' annual conference that charities must be more willing to collaborate in radical and creative ways. He said organisational legacies and boundaries, including grantmaking foundations' wishes to protect their image and history, are hindering the pursuit of substantive societal change. "You have to work incredibly hard to genuinely be willing to challenge the way in which your organisation works; its traditions, governance . . . and focus completely on whatever it is that is most likely to bring about change, Mr Taylor said, citing the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) as a “unique” model for collaborating to effect change. The DEC is "a collection of charities which, in extremis, put aside their individual interests and come together to create genuine momentum and help the public t ry and m ake a difference," he said. Third Sector Civil Society Guide Dogs to rebrand Guide Dogs has announced it is to rebrand and launch a new website in 2019 as it seeks to more than double the number of individuals it helps. Ray Brooks, chief information officer at the sight loss charity, noted unprompted awareness amongst the public is low. “If you say ‘can you name ten charities?’ only 2% name Guide Dogs,” he said. Guide Dogs is also to move towards a single database for everyone who comes into contact with the charity. People who have multiple roles can end up on “five different databases,” said Brooks. Civil Society LEGAL Care charity cuts sleeping workers' wages Social care charity Alternative Futures Group (AFG) plans to cut staff wages to below the National Minimum Wage for those on "sleep-in" shifts. The charity's proposal comes after the government published updated guidance on such shifts following a court decision earlier this year that said workers on sleep-in shifts were not always entitled to the full minimum wage. However Mencap, which was involved in the case, itself has said its court action was chiefly to prevent a backdated liability. Mencap chief executive Jan Tregelles said the government should legislate to ensure sleep-ins were paid at the minimum wage and said the charity remained committed to paying staff the full minimum wage for time spent asleep. Civil Society Barnardo’s loses legal battle to shift pensions indexation Children's charity Barnardo's has lost its legal push to save cash by switching the basis of annual increases for its pension scheme members from the Retail Prices Index (RPI) to the Consumer Prices Index, a typically lower measure. The charity’s trustees had argued they were able to switch from the RPI to “any replacement adopted by the trustees without prejudicing approval” as set out in their pension rules - but the charity’s appeal was dismissed in court. The judges said the correct interpretation of pension rules was that a different inflation calculation should only be used if the RPI itself is replaced. Financial Times Civil Society Charity Times RETAIL Charity shop numbers down by more than 100 in first half of 2018 Figures compiled by the data directory business the Local Data Company for its Retail and Leisure Trends Report show that the number of charity shops in Great Britain fell by 119 in the first six months of 2018. Yorkshire and Humber was the only British region that saw more charity shops open than close. In Scotland, 35 charity shops closed in the first half of 2018 - more than any other region of the UK. Third Sector Third Force News CAMPAIGNS Epilepsy campaign for schools Olivia Salvati is fronting a campaign by the Young Epilepsy charity to help educators recognise the signs of absence seizures. Ms Salvati claims that her seizures were often perceived as a lack of concentration in class. The charity states that the average school will have at least one epileptic student and that as signs can sometimes go unnoticed for long periods, teachers must be made aware of what to look out for. BBC News Spice Girls release charity clothing range The Spice Girls pop band has partnered with Comic Relief to create a clothing range, each item emblazoned with the hashtag #IwannabeaSpiceGirl. All of the proceeds will go towards Comic Relief's Gender Justice, which champions equality for women. Evening Standard

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Charity Times - 06/11/18

Posted by Claire Stradling

GOVERNMENT New charities minister appointed Mims Davies has been appointed to succeed Tracey Crouch as minister for sport and civil society, following the latter’s resignation last week. Davies is a trustee of a small military charity called Building Heroes, set up in 2016 to provide education, support and training to veterans. Charity leaders have congratulated Davies and begun raising issues with her. David Ainsworth, writing in Civil Society, states that Tracey Crouch’s departure “should make charities think again about what they want from government”. He states that Crouch’s Civil Society Strategy constitutes “a vision of what she’d like government’s relationship with the sector to be” but concludes that “the vision is not deliverable”. He identifies the problem as being that the current government does not see charities as relevant, and suggests that the issues facing charities cannot be solved in the Dep artment for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. Civil Society Civil Society The Daily Telegraph Food bank use increasing because of universal credit – Trussell Trust The Trussell Trust, the UK’s largest food bank charity has urged immediate change to the universal credit system after it released figures showing it distributed over 650,000 food parcels over the past six months. This number represents a year-on-year increase of 13%. The organisation said the government’s making new claimants wait five weeks or more for their first universal credit payment was a factor behind the rise. Emma Revie, Trussell’s chief executive, commented: “The only way to stop even more people being forced to food banks this winter will be to pause all new claims to universal credit, until funding is in place to reduce the five-week wait”. The Guardian GOVERNANCE Britain’s largest breast cancer charities to merge Breast Cancer Care and Breast Cancer Now are to merge to form a single charity in spring of next year. The two organisations will continue operating separately as they prepare for the merger, which will see Jill Thompson, currently a Trustee and Treasurer for Breast Cancer Care, become Chair of the combined charity. Delyth Morgan, currently CEO at Breast Cancer Now, will be CEO Designate, and Samia al Qadhi will step down as Chief Executive at Breast Cancer Care on 31 March next year. The current Chairs of both charities will also step down in April 2019. By merging, the two organisations aim to create one “comprehensive offer” for people affected by the disease and also increase their campaigning voice. Ms Thompson said: “Despite the enormous progress made by both charities, the challenge that lies ahead in breast cancer is unprecedented. This merger is a bold and exciting opportunity to rise to this challenge, together, and make a significant differe nce to the millions affected – providing support for today and hope for the future.” Fundraising Third Force News Galloway's Society for the Blind to get new chairman Galloway’s Society for the Blind is to get a new chairman. Simon Booth, who has sat on the board of trustees for 36 years and will replace John Ward, will officially take over the lead role at the AGM at Leyland Civic Centre on 23 November. He remarked: “The Booth family has been associated with Galloway’s for 150 years and I’m very proud to be able to take on the role of chairman.” He continued: “I believe the charity is making a real difference to local people who are living with sight loss.” Chorley Guardian CAMPAIGNS ‘Round Up for Charity’ campaign on Stena Line vessels Stena Line has launched a donation campaign across its entire fleet of 38 vessels in aid of Mercy Ships, which brings free, life-saving medical care around the world. Customers will be asked to Round Up for Charity until 27 November to make a donation to Mercy Ships. Niclas Mårtensson, CEO at Stena Line, commented: “We believe Round Up for Charity is a simple and effective way for our customers to help make a contribution to Mercy Ships’ inspiring work. Last year we managed to raise £11k during a two-month coffee campaign, and this year we hope to raise at least the same amount of money, in half the time”. Llanelli Online Belfast Daily More training needed to cut baby deaths According to charity Baby Lifeline, urgent training of frontline NHS staff is needed to save more babies' lives. A report from the charity claims that many cases of stillbirth and baby injury are avoidable with better maternity staff. Around 665,000 babies are born in England a year, with about 3,000 stillbirths. But Baby Lifeline said just 7.9% of trusts have adopted guidelines NHS England says could prevent around 600 stillbirths a year. Daily Mirror REGULATION Charities Commission investigates dog charity The Charities Commission has investigated animal welfare charity The Dog You Need after its chief, Peter Singh, was accused of benefiting from donations made by the public. At least £225,000 was given to the charity before UK activists discovered that over 20 dogs were being kept in cramped conditions at a house Mr Singh owned in Spain, which he claimed was a refuge for the animals. He was later fined £100 for making threats on social media to those who had raised questions over his activities. Daily Mirror Defunct housing charity investigated Now defunct Bristol-based housing charity Alternative Housing is the subject of a statutory inquiry by the Charity Commission, after it was convicted for several breaches of the Management of Houses in Multiple Occupation (England) Regulations 2006. Convictions against the organisation came about after a number of its properties were deemed unsatisfactory for residents. The commission has confirmed that its probe continues despite the closure of the charity. Third Sector FUNDRAISING JustGiving figures show profits double Annual accounts for JustGiving, the online fundraising platform, show it had a total revenue of £27m in the year to December 2017, but it no longer states how much is raised for charity via its platform. Based on previous figures, this figure is likely to be around £500m. It is believed that the reason for this year’s failure to provide this information is that JustGiving’s parent company, Blackbaud, considers it to be commercially sensitive. Civil Society LEGAL Caution urged over poppy merchandise Ahead of Remembrance weekend, people in Yorkshire are being warned against falling victim to so-called ‘poppy fraudsters’ after police seized hundreds of items of fake merchandise. The government’s Intellectual Property Office is working with the Royal British Legion to raise awareness of the issue. Intellectual Property Minister Sam Gyimah noted: “It is truly shocking that anyone would target and exploit one of the UK’s most cherished charities and take advantage of public support for our Armed Forces community.” He went on: “Together we can ensure donations go to the people they are intended for, by only supporting approved merchandise. Be vigilant when you are buying your poppies this year, and look out for the Royal British Legion logo to ensure the merchandise is approved and genuine.” Yorkshire Post WORKFORCE Scottish care staff reject pay offer Staff at Scottish care charity Cornerstone have voted overwhelmingly to reject a pay offer from their employer. With some 92% of workers opposed to the offer, Deborah Clarke, worker union Unison’s regional organiser described the ballot result as “an amazing show of strength by a predominantly female workforce. She noted: “Employers can no longer expect to get cheap labour on the backs of low-paid women. Cornerstone says it believes in fair work, so it beggars belief that they are refusing to engage with their staff on fair pay.” Civil Society INTERNATIONAL Differences between British and Australian legacy fundraising A blog post on Fundraising.co.uk analyses the differences between legacy fundraising in the UK and in Australia. The author had been on a study tour in London organised by Include a Charity, Australia’s equivalent to Remember a Charity, and attended theInstitute of Fundraising’s annual Legacy Conference. It is noted that there is a much stronger infrastructure around legacy fundraising in Britain, alongside more in-depth, legacy-specific research. However, Australians are said to be “better at donor stewardship and engagement of our existing supporters.” Fundraising.co.uk

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Charity Times - 30/10/18

Posted by Claire Stradling

BUDGET Charities underwhelmed by Budget Chancellor Philip Hammond's Budget speech yesterday included news of an increase from £20 to £30 in the individual donation limit under the Gift Aid Small Donations Scheme and a rise in the upper limit for tax-free trading that charities can carry out. Meanwhile, charity shops using the Retail Gift Aid Scheme are to be allowed to send letters to donors every three years when their goods raise less than £20 a year, rather than every tax year. Mr Hammond also announced an additional £10m of funding for air ambulances and £15m to charities and others to distribute surplus food. No mention was made of a ban to prevent online donation platforms taking fees from Gift Aid claimed on donations. Acevo CEO Vicki Browning said "the Budget set out a more positive vision from government than in recent years, but the substance is yet to be seen,” and Car on Bradshaw, chief executive of the Charity Finance Group, said: “Yet another Budget goes by without any strategic funding for the sector. The announcements on charity tax and some additional funding for local government social care and children’s services are to be welcomed, but they don’t go far enough. And it’s great to see funds for the military charities and air ambulances, however, worthy though those causes are, we desperately need the government to be more strategic in their funding of the sector as a whole." Karl Wilding, director of policy at NCVO, said: "There were some welcome and useful changes to a number of specific tax regulations for charities which will make life easier . . . [but] More broadly, charities are playing an ever-bigger role in society and we’d like to see the government reflect this. Third Sector Civil Society £650m for social care ‘inadequate and temporary’ Glen Garrod, president of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, has warned that £650m of “inadequate and temporary” extra social care funding in the Budget will not address the problems facing the social care sector. Ahead of the Budget, charities had called for a £2.5bn funding boost to keep social care services operating at current levels. The Chancellor has deferred a longer-term funding plan until the completion of a forthcoming Green Paper, and he said that he recognised “the immediate pressures local authorities face in respect of social care.” Alzheimer’s Society chief executive Jeremy Hughes said the announced funding “only just staves off total collapse,” and “does nothing for people with dementia who are footing the bill themselves, while people with other diseases are getting free support.” The Times Daily Mail FUNDRAISING Making it happen Sector bodies including NCVO, CharityComms, Small Charities Coalition, FSI, the Institute of Fundraising and ACEVO are urging charities to use the hashtag #YouMadeItHappen on social media on Monday November 19th in a move that it is hoped will demonstrate the difference charities and supporters can make together. Charities are also being encouraged to think of their own thank you message to supporters and to share it on social media channels with images and the hashtag. NCVO’s Aidan Warner says: "We want to remind people of everything that’s great about charities, and show them we’re very grateful for their support.” The Small Charities Coalition tweeted: "Proud to be involved in this campaign where we can take time to celebrate our amazing supporters and all the wonderful people that support the 9 7% of ch arities in the UK that are small." UKFundraising Civil Society Charity partners with Alexa The British Heart Foundation is to allow donations through Amazon's Alexa voice-activated device in what the charity says is a first for the sector. Donors will be able to download a "skill" to the Alexa app to allow users to donate to BHF through Amazon Pay, or to organise the collection of furniture or electrical goods. Simon Gillespie, the charity's chief executive, said: "More people than ever own a digital assistant like the Amazon Echo and it’s really exciting for our supporters to be able to use their devices to support life-saving heart research . . . We’re constantly adapting as an organisation to be where our supporters are and to give people choice to make donating as easy as possible." Third Sector Charity Digital News Third Force News UK climbs giving index The UK is listed as the sixth most generous country in the latest edition of Charities Aid Foundation’s annual World Giving Index. Last year, it was ranked eleventh in the yearly measure of how many people have recently either donated, volunteered, or helped a stranger. According to the index, 68% of people in the UK gave money to a charity in the last month, an increase on 64% the previous year. Meanwhile, 63% had “helped a stranger” and a third had volunteered. Indonesia is the most generous country in the world, according to the index, followed by Australia and New Zealand. Ireland is the only other European country in the index’s top 10, coming one place above the UK. The Netherlands, Norway, Iceland and Malta all feature in the top 20. Civil Society UKFundraising DIGITAL CAF says charities must get ahead on tech The head of policy at the Charities Aid Foundation has told the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Charities and Volunteering that the sector isn't doing enough to embrace new technologies including the potential of digital currencies and assets. Rhodri Davies told MPs last week: "If we look back to any of the previous industrial revolutions we have had, civil society has played a vital role in minimising some of the harms while maximising the possible opportunities of technological development . . . I think it is absolutely crucial that we do the same in this fourth industrial revolution, and my concern is that we are not currently as well placed as we should be to do that." Meanwhile, Julia Unwin, the chair of the independent inquiry into the future of civil society, told the APPG that larger charities "need to pay really careful attention to some of the challenges that are coming our way" and be aware of their role as forums where difficult topics could be discussed. Third Sector RISK Foodbank wins award for counter-fraud activity Colchester Foodbank has won the small charity category at this year’s Charities Against Fraud Awards . The charity overhauled its financial controls following several unauthorised withdrawals from its bank account. Caroline Beckett, trustee at Colchester Foodbank, said the training of volunteers to know what good practice looks like was key to the success of its review of procedures and policies. “Rather than focusing on what can actually go wrong and panicking everybody, if we just get people to recognise what good practice looks like, then they can spot when there are deviations from that,” she said. Oxfam won the large charity category at the awards. Civil Society STRATEGY Welsh charity sector's Brexit fears Third sector organisations in Wales have presented their Brexit concerns to the Welsh government. The Wales Council for Voluntary Action and the Wales GovernanceCentre at Cardiff University set up the Wales Civil Society Forum on Brexit earlier this year to help the third sector better engage with, and influence, the Brexit debate.UKFundraising notes that Welsh third sector concerns typically fall into four areas: funding, and particularly fears that a Shared Prosperity Fund will not match the £2.1bn in EU Structural Funds; the environment and animal welfare; equality and human rights; and immigration. Welsh Government Finance Secretary Mark Drakeford said in response to the Forum's position statement: “Whatever the form Brexit takes, it will cause disruption to Wales. That is why we, as a responsible government, will continue to plan for all possible outcomes. The third sector must also think carefully about how it responds to Brexit while continuing to deliver vital services to our communities." UKFundraising LEGAL Charity Commission expresses concerns at serious incident reporting levels The Charity Commission said last week that only 0.9% of registered charities have reported safeguarding incidents over the past four years, and that just 1.5% had submitted any sort of serious incident report. The Commission said that while for some charities incidents will be rare, and others may experience none at all, “It seems unlikely that 99.1% of charities do not experience any reportable safeguarding issues over a four-year period” and concluded that “we are seeing significant under-reporting.” The commission last week published updated safeguarding guidance in a bid to help trustees understand their duties. The guidance is designed to provide a single concise and easy-to-use resource and is not intended to change how trustees go about their role in this regard, the regulator said. Meanwhile, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) says it will spend up to £2m on measures to improve safeguarding among charities in England. The funding, from existing DCMS budgets, will be used to enhance incident reporting, on projects such as finding digital ways for people to report safeguarding concerns to the correct person. More announcements on the precise funding amounts are expected to be made in due course. Civil Society GOV.UK Third Sector WORKFORCE Union welcomes charity's anti-bullying commitment The Unite trade union says it welcomes a commitment by new RSPCA boss Chris Sherwood to confront a culture of bullying and harassment at the animal welfare charity. The survey undertaken by Unite found that almost one in three staff (29.3%) had experienced some degree of bullying in the previous year and more than a third (37%) of the 622 staff members polled had witnessed someone being bullied over the last twelve months. Mr Sherwood told Third Sector magazine that the RSPCA will work with Unite to review relevant policies and look at ways to ensure that staff can raise concerns and are supported. UKFundraising INTERNATIONAL Have a Laugh for Loneliness, says O’Carroll Irish actor and comedian Brendan O’Carroll is backing the ‘Have a Laugh for Loneliness’ campaign organised by charity ALONE. Mr O’Carroll, the star of Mrs. Brown’s Boys, said that up to a tenth of older people in Ireland experience chronic loneliness, and that the charity’s work “to combat this is extremely valuable and the difference it makes in the lives of older people is powerful.” He added: “We’re hoping that by having a laugh for loneliness, the public will not only raise funds for ALONE but help to combat loneliness in their community.” The charity has reported that the number of people using its services has doubled since 2016, with its staff supporting 1,900 people. BreakingNews.ie

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Charity Times - Tuesday, 23rd October 2018

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING Charities aren't facing up to their mistakes Unicef's global head of street fundraising says charities have not “learned from mistakes” about face-to-face fundraising and a 'chugger' narrative remains damaging to charity brands. Daniel McDonnell said the strategy was burdened with negative connotations, even in emerging fundraising markets, because of oversaturation and a lack of investment in mystery shopping. “This chugger thing, it’s the perception of face-to-face fundraisers and there has been media exposé after media exposé around the world about this, particularly in the UK," he said. "The really scary thing is that it’s popping up in country after country now. History is repeating itself over and over again," he told attendees at the International Fundraising Congress in the Netherlands last week. Meanwhile, the Children's Society's Joe Jenkins used the same platform to say that UK government cuts meant cha rities a re “taking chunks out of each other” as they compete for funds from the public. "The National Council for Voluntary Organisations projects there is going to be at least a £4bn gap between the rates that voluntary income can grow, compared to the rate at which government funding will contract," he said. Civil Society Third Sector 21,000 complaints fielded by Top 50 last year An examination of annual accounts for the 2017/18 financial year shows that the 50 largest charities by fundraising income were collectively responsible for over 21,000 fundraising complaints from members of the public last year. All charities are newly required to report the number of fundraising complaints they had received from members of the public. Macmillan Cancer Support was the most complained about charity in the 2017/18 financial year: it received 6,600 complaints, up from more than 4,000 the previous year. Cancer Research UK was the second most complained about charity, receiving 1,821 complaints directly related to its fundraising. Marie Curieand the British Heart Foundation were the two other charities to receive more than 1,000 fundraising complaints in the last financial year. A spokesperson for Macmillan said that the increase in complaints was due to the charity� 9;s defi nition of “any expression of dissatisfaction" being revised. Civil Society Government lottery plans unsettle Camelot The Times reports that Camelot is unhappy about government plans to give society lotteries such as the People's Postcode Lottery (PPL) the power to offer larger prizes. Camelot, which operates the National Lottery, contends that society lotteries blur the distinction between its role and those of smaller community lotteries. “We are concerned that these proposed changes to sales and prize limits further erode the distinction, putting returns to good causes and society at risk,” Camelot said. The PPL said the changes would “allow millions more to be raised for good causes, something we and our player-supported charities hope to see happen in the near future”. The Times Webgains and The Prince’s Trust partner via Savoo The Prince’s Trust and marketing firm Webgains have announced a digital partnership combining donations and discounts facilitated by online fundraising and money-saving platform Savoo. Each time a Webgains employee uses the platform to buy business products and services, Savoo will make a donation to The Prince’s Trust at no extra cost. Kimberley Wilson, Support Services Manager at The Prince’s Trust, said: “Savoo’s platform . . . provides new opportunities for charities to build on new donor relationships and new corporate businesses, whilst receiving donations to help the cause and raising that awareness to new audiences." UKFundraising FINANCE Reach Fund makes further £7.2m available The Reach Fund is to be extended for three more years and a further £7.2m will be made available for charities and social enterprises. Funded by Access – The Foundation for Social Investment and run by Social Investment Business, the fund provides grants of up to £15,000 to organisations that need help taking on loans. Access CEO Seb Elsworth said: "The Reach Fund is working in terms of helping more charities and social enterprises to take on social investment. It is working in terms of growing a market for support based around the country, which is providing good value for money. It is also working in terms of helping social investment providers expand their reach into the sector and work with a greater diversity of charities and social enterprises." Third Sector Big UK charities see cash levels rise Top charities increased their cash levels by £500m last year, according to new research from Charity Financials. The Barclays sponsored report, Charity Banking Spotlight, found that in 2017-18 cash levels were in excess of £16.7bn, up from the £16.2bn reported in the previous financial year. Charities Aid Foundation has the highest cash values, followed by Church Commissioners for England and The British Council. Collectively, the top 25 charities hold cash totalling £3.3bn, according to the report. UKFundraising Third Force News Third Sector GOVERNANCE Regulator opens statutory inquiry into two related charitable organisations The Charity Commission has launched a class statutory inquiry into Future Vision Care and Future Vision Consortium. Future Vision Consortium is a charity that is connected to Future Vision Care, an unregistered charitable company which provides professional care services to the elderly and needy. Despite being unregistered, Future Vision Care falls under the Commission’s jurisdiction as it has been set up for exclusively charitable purposes and is subject to the control of the High Court’s charity law jurisdiction. In October 2017, the registered charity was included in the Commission’s double defaulter class statutory inquiry, which looked into charities that had defaulted on their annual reporting obligations two or more times in the last 5 years. The new class inquiry follows unresolved concerns around the non-submission of valid accounts. Third Sector GOV.UK INTERNATIONAL UK to launch charity predator register International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt is to announce a worldwide register of suspected sexual predators working in the aid sector as part of the “concerted global effort” to clean up the charity world. The announcement was made as the world’s leading aid players gathered in London last week to make major commitments at the International Safeguarding Summit on the prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse. The summit’s theme was “Putting People First” - with the focus on preventing abuse and improving support for victims and survivors. Ms Mordaunt said ahead of the summit: "We realise there is much work still to do, but this a moment to say: ‘No more’. We have to give the people that we are here to help the protection that they need." The Times GOV.UK Pakistan tells NGOs to wind up operations The Telegraph reports that aid to 11 million people in Pakistan is at risk after 18 charities and NGOs, including UK-based charities Plan International and International Alert, were told earlier this month that they had 60 days to cease operations after being denied official registration. Pakistan's new prime minister Imran Khan is understood to be under pressure from the country's powerful military intelligence,which has accused foreign aid organisations of being a front for spying. The organisations were given no official reason for the ban. The Daily Telegraph EMPLOYMENT Marie Curie paid £1.3m in sta ff lay-off costs last year Marie Curie spent almost £1.3m on termination payments last year following a restructuring, according to the charity's latest accounts. The number of employees nevertheless increased during the year; the charity employs 4,317 people, up from 4,274 the year before. The figure for 2017/18 includes 1,399 full-time employees. Third Sector RISK It's Charity Fraud Awareness Week This week is Charity Fraud Awareness Week 2018. Each day of the global event is focusing on a different theme. More than 40 charities, regulators and professional representatives, including the Fraud Advisory Panel and Charity Commission, are taking part. Tuesday's theme is grant fraud, due diligence and partnership working; Wednesday is donation fraud and legacy fraud; on Thursday it's insider fraud; and Friday's theme is moving money safely. Charity Digital News Third Force News Balancing GDPR with core activity Mark Chynoweth, general manager of Really Good Data Protection (RGDP), advises on how charities can ensure compliance with new EU data privacy rules without a negative impact on core activities. "A . . . risk for small charities is that they are less likely to successfully weather the potentially significant financial penalties and reputational damage caused by a breach," he notes. Third Force News SUPPORT More support for older volunteers The Centre for Ageing Better says charities and funders must make greater efforts to support older volunteers. Its government-backed report uses figures from the government’s 2018 Community Life Survey which found that more than 40% of people aged over 50 volunteer in some way every month. The report calls for funders to apply age-friendly and inclusive principles to their funding decisions and criteria, and to cover the costs of accessibility and more inclusive approaches; voluntary and community sector organisations to partner to tackle issues including expenses, flexibility and access; and local government and public commissioners to recognise the value of volunteering in encouraging wellbeing and social connections. Civil Society CAMPAIGNS Cancer charities launch new interactive video campaigns Children with Cancer UK and Stand up To Cancer have both announced new interactive video initiatives, reports Third Sector. Third Sector

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Charity Times - 16/10/18

Posted by Claire Stradling

DIGITAL Labour MP criticises Big Lottery Fund Labour’s shadow minister for civil society has criticised the Big Lottery Fund ’s new £15m digital fund for not focusing on small charities. Steve Reed said he was unhappy about the first funding strand's exclusion of “over four in five UK charities who have an income below £500,000," adding “Smaller charities are best placed to pilot new technologies, so . . . I urge the Big Lottery Fund to look urgently at how they can support smaller charities to use digital technology to become more effective.” The Small Charities Coalition also made known its disappointment about the first strand's targeting of charities with an income of at least £500,000. The coalition posted on social media: “Strand 1 excludes 80% of UK charities, Strand 2 requires charities to already be 'highly digital'. This is not the case for lots of #smallbutvital charities.” A spokesperson for the Big Lottery Fund responded: "We work with small charities every day, and understand and value the work they do . . . Through National Lottery Awards for All we provide around £90m of funding every year, the majority of which goes to small grassroots organisations, including to support digital activities." Civil Society Sector's first Digital Code of Practice More than 100 charities have contributed to the UK’s first Charity Digital Code of Practice , which is due to launch on November 15th. The Code, which will be voluntary and free to access for all charities, will seek to help charities improve their digital skills and increase their take up of digital activity. The consultation revealed strong enthusiasm for the Code, with 79% of respondents saying they will ‘definitely’ or ‘probably’ use it. It is funded by Lloyds Banking Group and the Co-op Foundation and managed by a steering group of representatives from across the sector. Age UK chief digital and technology officer, Lara Burns, said: “As a sector, there is much more we can do to fully embrace the opportunities that digital technology offers and the Charity Digital Code of Practice will provide a welcome structure for this . . . It will give a helpful direction for leadership and governance, and a potential framework for collaborating across the sector and sharing learnings, whilst the resources will provide practical help for delivering programmes.” Charity Times UKFundraising Charities unprepared for digital tax requirements Attendees at last week's Charity Finance Summit heard that charities are confused and unprepared for the government’s digital tax requirements ahead of their introduction next year. Richard Bray, regulatory and taxes manager at Cancer Research UK and vice-chair of the Charity Tax Group , asked the audience of about 300 charity finance professionals whether they were comfortable that they will be able to comply with the government’s Making Tax Digital (MTD) scheme for VAT returns. Only a handful said they were, reports Civil Society. Civil Society LEGAL UC charities hit by ‘gagging orders’ The Times reports that at least 22 organisations that work with Universal Credit claimants have been forced to agree to “pay the utmost regard to the standing and reputation” of Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey, and must “not do anything which may attract adverse publicity to her or harm public confidence in her.” The contracts, totalling £1.8bn, have been condemned by charities, with Shelter’s chief executive Polly Neate saying it was “deeply troubling that the government might seek to use services contracted for the most vulnerable to influence fair criticism of their policies,” while mental health charity Mind warned that “gagging clauses” prevent charities from campaigning independently. Labour’s Margaret Greenwood has written to Ms McVey to warn that gagging clauses for charities are “unacceptable in modern Britain.” The Times Third Sector Civil Society GOVERNANCE Guidance on reporting serious wrongdoing Revised guidance on whistleblowing and reporting incidents of serious harm has been published by the Charity Commission . A spokeswoman for the commission said: “As regulator we place great importance in whistleblowers who often bring vital information that helps us hold charities to account . . . We have updated our guidance on whistleblowing to help people better understand when, and how, they can report wrongdoing to us. These changes are designed to make our guidance more accessible. We want to make it as easy as possible for people who make what is often a brave decision to come to us with concerns.” The commission said examples of serious harm include if an individual’s health or safety is in danger, a criminal offence such as theft or fraud, substantive loss of funds, or failure to meet legal obligations. Civil Society FUNDRAISING JustGiving scraps fees for major incident and disaster campaigns JustGiving is ditching its fees from all pages set up in response to major incidents and disasters. Platform users will now only have to pay a third-party processing fee on card payments and will be given the option of making a contribution to support the operation of the platform. Peter Lewis, CEO at the Institute of Fundraising said: “We are pleased to see JustGiving continuing to develop its model and responding proactively to enable donors’ money to go even further, especially at times of major incidents.” Civil Society notes that the move comes in the wake of a critical report on BBC 5 Live Investigates about fundraising platforms' fee structures. Civil Society UKFundraising London Marathon Events appoints first head of charities London Marathon Events has appointed Kenneth Foreman as its first head of charities to develop partnerships to ensure fundraising opportunities are developed and maximised at all the trust's events. Mr Foreman, who was formerly senior sporting events and partnerships manager for Alzheimer’s Research UK , said: “With my background in sporting event fundraising, I will look to bring my charity experience to London Marathon Events and help us continue to provide charities with a significant opportunity to raise much needed funds for their causes." Civil Society eBay's first 'Give Day' supports the Princes Trust eBay is to donate up to £150k to the Princes Trust after its inaugural 24-hour 'Give Day.' Any item shoppers placed in an eBay basket throughout the day saw the e-commerce site contribute 5p to the charity's Enterprise programme, which supports young entrepreneurs looking to start their own business. eBay UK’s vice president Rob Hattrell said: “We’re so excited to support the brilliant Prince’s Trust. The UK is powered by small businesses and we want to give the next generation as much support as we can." Retail Gazette Third Sector FINANCE Vodafone launches social innovation award programme Vodafone is inviting innovative start-ups and early-stage ventures to apply for potential funding after unveiling a UK social innovation award programme - branded Vodafone Techstarter. The initiative aims to uncover and develop ideas that can "harness the power of technology, connectivity and innovation to improve health, education, environmental protection or social mobility". The £300,000 fund is open to UK-based inventors, innovators, charities, social enterprises, businesses and entrepreneurs. The Scotsman CAMPAIGNS Four-city charity sleep-out to tackle homelessness A four-city charity sleep-out is aiming to raise funds to help eradicate homelessness.Social Bite co-founder Josh Littlejohn MBE said the charity was trying something new: “This year we’re doing something that’s never been done before – holding a simultaneous multi-city sleep-out in four of Scotland’s major cities, and we’re looking for the people of Dundee to get behind the cause and join our movement to eradicate homelessness.” Along with Dundee, events will be held on the same night, December 8th, in Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdeen. Mr Littlejohn added that he was “so grateful to Dundee City Council for pledging 100 homes as part of our Housing First initiative.” Dundee Courier Charity urges retailers to ban home dopplers sales Stillbirth charity Kicks Count has urged eBay, Amazon and Facebook to ban the sale of home dopplers from their websites, claiming the devices, which can pick up a baby’s heartbeat, provide pregnant women with a false sense of security when something goes wrong. Kicks Count chief executive Elizabeth Hutton, said: “Foetal dopplers are complex pieces of medical equipment and should not be available to the general public.” Daily Mail Charity shops to offer inexpensive interview clothes Over 650 charity shops across the UK are supporting the ‘dress to impress’ initiative launched by careers app Debut, with stores to offer clothes suitable for a job interview for £ 10. Charlie Taylor, founder of the app, said: "Everyone in the UK can benefit from this campaign - jobseekers can pick up a great outfit on a budget and feel interview-ready, while everyone else can get involved and donate their own pre-loved interview attire that they no longer need to help a number of fantastic causes.” The Independent Mums who lost teens to suicide start mental health charity Charity Safaplace has paid more than £15,000 for mental health experts to give talks to pupils and to train teachers to spot signs of distress. The charity was founded by Rose White and Sarah Finke, two mothers who both lost children at Stoke Newington School in north east London to suicide. The aim is to expand beyond the school, which the mothers praised for being “supportive and respectful” following the tragedies. Evening Standard OTHER Children’s charity founder is honoured Carmel McConnell MBE, the founder of children's charity Magic Breakfast, which provides free breakfasts for children in primary and secondary schools, has been named the campaigner of the year at the Women of the Year awards. Alex Cunningham, chief executive of the charity, said: “Carmel . . . is an amazing inspiration to all of us and we know that she will not stop campaigning for school breakfasts until there is no child in the UK starting their school day too hungry to learn." Anne-Marie Imafidon, the founder of Stemettes, a social enterprise which encourages girls into science, was also among the Women of the Year winners. The i

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Charity Times - 09/10/18

Posted by Claire Stradling

GOVERNANCE Regulator reveals five-year strategy The Charity Commission has a new five-year strategy that signals a move towards more collaborative working and calls for better standards of behaviour from the sector. Baroness Stowell last week told an audience at the Royal Society of Arts that charities must do more to set a good example, and that both the sector and the regulator need to “promote what is special about charity, and to meet legitimate public expectations of charity,” or else “risk being complicit in its decline.” Third Sector editor Andy Hillier, in reflecting upon the commission's new strategy, says a "completely new form of regulation" may be needed following recent scandals that have seen it relegated to the shadows during ensuing investigations. On Friday, Baroness Stowell spoke to Radio 4's Today programme and said charities have “the potential to do a whole lot better.” She told Justin Webb: “All char ities, n ot just the big ones, have to recognise that they have to demonstrate charitable behaviour and charitable attitude . . . My main requirement right now is for charities themselves to recognise that they have a responsibility in making this change. It can’t all be down to the regulator, it can’t all be down to somebody else, it’s got to be charities themselves.” Third Sector Civil Society FUNDRAISING Millennials' favourite charities A new survey from YouGov suggests the National Trust is the most popular charity in the UK with millennials. Mind placed second in the rankings based on YouGov's 'Word of mouth' metric, with The Dogs Trust in third place, followed by Battersea and Guide Dogs. Rounding out the top ten are Macmillan Cancer Support, British Heart Foundation, Children in Need, Cancer Research, and RSPCA. Briony Gunstone, director of public sector works for YouGov, said the findings challenged preconceptions that the National Trust is for “older generations.” Civil Society FINANCE Charity investment returns have halved A survey of 97 UK charities, with assets of over £11bn, has found that in the year to March 31st 2018, the average total return for charities was 4.2% compared to 10.9% last time. Meanwhile, almost a quarter of charities took a withdrawal of 5% or more to invest in their charitable activities, compared to an eighth of charities in the survey for the previous twelve months. The survey also suggests charities becoming increasingly concerned about a toughening regulatory and legal environment, and responses elsewhere to the survey indicate a lack of diversity on trustee boards. Civil Society Charities' core functions are under-resourced A study by Charity Finance magazine to mark the inaugural Charity Finance Weeksuggests that nearly two-thirds (63%) of charities think their core functions including finance, human resources, IT, safeguarding and legal support, are under-resourced. Reasons given for the situation included a failure to keep on top of growth; under-representation of finance on the senior management team; and increased regulation. Charity Finance Civil Society DIGITAL Charities scoop chatbot cash Two charities have netted £300,000 each to develop AI chatbot support. The grants will help CALM (Campaign against Living Miserably) and Missing People to handle more enquiries and broaden the online support they offer vulnerable people. The two charities were among 76 entries for the Worshipful Company of Information Technologies (WCIT) Charity IT Award 2018. The judges decided to divide the £600,000 award between the two charities because of the high quality of both bids. Missing People offers free round the clock support to people who are missing and their families, and CALM works to prevent male suicide and provides free anonymous and confidential support online and by phone. WCIT will also now help more charities develop artificial intelligence with the creation of a sector-wide artificial intelligence expert group that will seek to use WCIT members ’ AI skills to create momentum for effective use of this ground-breaking technology by charities. Charity Digital News Solicitor general's concern about digital skills A fringe meeting on the subject of charities and technology at last week's Conservative Party Conference heard solicitor general Robert Buckland voice his concern about a perceived lack of digital skills in the sector. The Conservative MP for South Swindon noted that the “digital revolution has empowered people to have more knowledge about the sector than ever before.” He also used his platform at the even organised by theCharities Aid Foundation to say that “no charity has a permanent right to exist or enjoy trust” and that those which are well managed should “have nothing to fear from increased transparency.” Civil Society £15m charity digital fund is launched The Big Lottery Fund is launching a new £15m digital fund on October 22nd to offer dedicated digital funding support to the third sector. The fund will operate for two years and will award grants of up to £500,000. Dawn Austwick, chief executive of the Big Lottery Fund, said: “We are delighted to launch our new £15m Digital Fund today. It will help both digital natives and digital pioneers maximise their impact, by putting people at the heart of their digital services.” Third Force News Civil Society RISK Russian hackers targeted cancer charity An anonymous Russian group of cyber-criminals sought to steal the card details of people in the UK who had brought items through online gift shop of Cancer Research UK, according to cybersecurity experts. The hackers planted malicious code into the charity's website that was designed to compromise the credit card information of people who made purchases online. Nigel Armitt, chief financial officer at CRUK, said: “The online store services were immediately disabled to ensure the exposure was limited and a subsequent investigation conducted by a third-party firm confirmed that there were no supporters impacted by the event," adding “We reported the incident to the Information Commissioner’s Office, who were fully apprised of the situation and took no further action.” The Daily Telegraph Daily Mail Looking ahead to Charity Fraud Awareness Week The third annual Charity Fraud Awareness Week takes place from October 22nd-26th. The main aims of the Charity Commission-supported week are to raise awareness of the key risks affecting the sector, promote and share good counter-fraud practices, and promote honesty and openness about fraud. More than 40 charities, regulatory agencies, professional bodies and stakeholders will partner to help combat fraud which is targeted at charities. UKFundraising DIVERSITY Corporate parallels the third sector can learn from Don Bawtree, writing for Third Sector, suggests charities that have yet to get to grips with the requirement to include a diversity statement in their annual report should take note of the Financial Reporting Council’s research on FTSE 350 companies, which showed how far they need to go to develop clearer strategies to drive greater diversity at senior management level. Third Sector CAMPAIGNS Getting peacebuilding in the dictionary International Alert is campaigning to get the word 'peacebuilding' in to the Oxford English Dictionary, Harper Collins and Merriam Webster dictionaries. The word is used by the United Nations, the World Bank and by governments, businesses, non-governmental organisations and peacebuilders globally, and the charity believes its inclusion in dictionaries will aid understanding of the concept. International Alert Peace News Amazon scheme supports extremists The Times claims that Amazon is funding the Muslim Research and Development Foundation, a British charity which it alleges backs child marriage, female genital mutilation and stoning adulterers. The charity reportedly receives donations when supporters buy products under the Amazon Smile programme. The case has been referred to the Charity Commission due to the “serious concerns.” The Times The Sun State schools make their way into the debate The Economist explores how many schools in the state sector have taken up debating in recent years, traditionally a preserve of the private school sector. The charity Debate Mate now works with 240 schools serving deprived areas, while another 180 take part in six regional championships set up three years ago by PiXL, a non-profit organisation, and Noisy Classroom, which promotes speaking skills. Meanwhile last year the English-Speaking Union (ESU), Britain’s main debating organisation, began to provide free help to 100 schools with a high proportion of disadvantaged pupils. The Economist

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Charity Times - 02/10/18

Posted by Claire Stradling

FUNDRAISING Tapping for change in people’s giving habits New data show people in the UK donate an average of £6.15 when giving through a contactless Tap for Change box. In the last three months, the terminals have been used to make 16,250 charitable donations. UKFundraising notes that Royal Trinity Hospice in London has seen a five-fold increase in donations since it replaced static collection tins with 10 Tap For Change terminals. Alessandra Novelli, Corporate Partnerships Manager at Royal Trinity Hospice, said: “Tap For Change has transformed our fundraising . . . It would take years to raise the same amount from people emptying their pockets of loose change, and it would require a logistical army to collect and bank those donations." She added: “The technology has also allowed us to successfully approach high street partners where customers don’t handle cash . . . Those partners would have previously been reluctant to host a coin collec tion box .” UKFundraising Brain study could provide clues on donors' mind-sets Researchers from the University of Sussex say completely altruistic generosity gives donors more of a 'warm glow' than generosity which expects reward. The study found that acts of altruism activate some reward areas of the brain more intensely than when people act with strategic kindness – ie, when there is an opportunity for others to return a favour. Jo Cutler, the PhD student who co-authored the study, said: "The finding of different motivations for giving raises all sorts of questions, including what charities and organisations can learn about what motivates their donors . . . Organisations looking for contributions should think about how they want their customers to feel. Do they want them to feel altruistic, and experience a warm glow, or do they want them to enter with a transactional mind-set?" Third Sector EurekAlert Cancer charities in battle for funds Cancer Research UK (CRUK) is staging its Dryathlon mass participation fundraising event next month in a move that puts it in direct competition with Macmillan's annual Go Sober for October drive. CRUK normally runs Dryathlon, where people are urged to give up alcohol for a month, in January. Go Sober is placed fifth in a recent index of the top mass fundraising events in the UK, raising £5.2m. Dryathlon, meanwhile, did not appear among the biggest mass fundraising events for 2017. Sarah Pickersgill, head of fundraising products at CRUK, said: This year we are trialling Dryathlon in October as an initial step to keeping the campaign open all year round so that people can give up alcohol at any point to raise money for Cancer Research UK. This is something we will be looking to do across all our fundraising campaigns.” Third Force News Charity bag fraud warning The Fundraising Regulator and Local Government Association have issued a joint warning about fraudulent charity clothing collections, calling on the public "to do some basic checks to help them tell a genuine charity clothing collection from a potential fraud.” A checklist on the Fundraising Regulator's website for genuine charity collections warns members of the public to "be wary of donating if the wording on the bag has poor spelling, punctuation or grammar” and to “be cautious if the bag collection is for general charitable causes, such as ‘for local sick children’, instead of a named charity”. Civil Society FINANCE Many small charities provide inaccurate financial data A Charity Commission report suggests that 38% of small charities provide inaccurate financial information in their financial returns. The study says too many charities rely on people with inadequate knowledge to complete the necessary documents. Some charities compiled annual accounts based on the wrong guidance and others did not correctly match their annual return to their statement of financial activities. “Not providing accurate financial information is misleading and can have an impact on public trust . . . People want to know how charities spend their money; so this result is clearly not good enough,” said Nigel Davies, head of accountancy services at the commission. Third Sector Civil Society UKFundraising Public Finance Leading ethical tourism charity closes down Tourism Concern , the UK-based charity campaigning for ethical and sustainable travel around the world, has closed after three decades because of a lack of financial support. A statement from the charity said: “Funding from charitable foundations, which sustained us in the past, is no longer available. The trustees were determined that Tourism Concern should not become a zombie charity, raising money simply to exist.” Hannah Hesford of tour operator Rickshaw said: “It’s a great loss to the industry . . . Currently, we don’t know of [another] charity that operates in the same way they did.” The Guardian DIGITAL Debt charity plans tech overhaul Debt charity StepChange is planning a digital revamp as it seeks to double the number of people it helps. Technology improvements under consideration include integrating the charity’s automated online debt advice service with its telephone service to avoid duplication of user input. The charity's four-year strategy states: “If we’re to keep up with the needs of our clients then we need to change too . . . This will mean better services for our clients and a better workplace for our colleagues. It’s also a vital investment to make sure we have the flexibility and agility to gear up our service in line with demand.” Charity Digital News Government urged to help charities with digital skills Speaking at a fringe event hosted by the Charities Aid Foundation at the Labour Party Conference in Liverpool last week, Labour MP Chi Onwurah has urged the government and the Charity Commission to help boost charities’ data skills. The shadow minister for industrial strategy, science and innovation said charities must be included in any framework for using and sharing data “otherwise it will be dominated by the interests of the tech giants who have both the voice and the resources.” Civil Society GOVERNANCE Regulator wants change in attitudes and behaviour Responding to a consultation on a voluntary code of conduct called by the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO), the Charity Commission has urged change in both the sector's organisational culture and individuals' attitudes and behaviour. The regulator said it welcomed the suggestion of a voluntary code and noted: "As recent events have shown, ensuring that charities live up to their purpose and the public’s high expectations is about more than compliance with minimum legal requirements." The commission went on to underscore the importance of moral leadership, the need for a proactive approach to inclusion, and for the risk environment to be considered when approaching safeguarding issues. Accountancy Daily Small Charities Coalition chief resigns Mandy Johnson is stepping down as chief executive of the Small Charities Coalition(SCC). She had been in post for just over a year. The SCC said that it will be appointing an interim CEO as soon as possible and that Rachel Harding, head of services and Lizzie Walmsley, head of communications and external affairs, will continue to manage the office with the support of the board. UKFundraising Civil Society Interim manager appointed to the Fazal Ellahi Charitable Trust The Charity Commission has appointed an interim manager to Fazal Ellahi Charitable Trust, a Birmingham based mosque charity which is under investigation after an imam was convicted of six counts of encouraging terrorism. The regulator opened a statutory inquiry into the charity earlier this year to look into a number of concerns including the use of the charity’s premises to support or condone terrorism. Jonathan Burchfield of law firm Stone King will now assume the management and administration of the charity. Civil Society GOV.UK SUPPORT Cash boost for charitable prison and probation projects The government has awarded £2.4m grant funding to 13 new voluntary projects across England and Wales which promote wellbeing, improve rehabilitation and reduce reoffending. Evidence shows having sustainable work on release significantly reduces reoffending; the support provided by these charities will help prisons promote employment opportunities for those who have been in custody. Prisons Minister Rory Stewart said: "Charities and social enterprises are crucial in helping us to provide better rehabilitation, promote wellbeing and ultimately reduce reoffending and I look forward to seeing the positive impact of these grants over the coming years." GOV.UK RISK Latest regulatory guidance on safeguarding Tabitha Cave, a partner and the head of regulatory compliance at London law firm VWV, considers the latest regulatory guidance on safeguarding and what charities should be doing. She advises trustees to measure aspects of the charity's culture as they are with a view to assessing the current position and monitoring change over time. Metrics including statistics about recorded issues, stakeholder confidence (for example from discussion/surveys/appraisal) and third-party data, including inspection reports, audits and feedback, and triangulation of data from these different sources, can be used in this assessment. Civil Society RETAIL Decline in charity shop numbers The 27th edition of The Charity Shops Survey from Charity Finance magazine in association with Fundraising Magazine shows that the number of charity shops has fallen for the first time in 15 years. Data collected from 71 charities saw them end the twelve month period under review with a total 12 fewer stores than they started the year with. But after two years of decline the 2018 survey shows a record level of volunteer hours per shop and the average wages of charity shops staff have increased by 3.3%. Civil Society CAMPAIGNS Mental health campaign targets freshers Celebrities and social media influencers are participating in an Instagram campaign launched by two charities aimed at addressing mental health problems faced by young people when they start university. The Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM), which supports men at risk of suicide, and The Mix, a crisis support charity for young people, have created an Instagram zine to help those starting university feel more emotionally secure. Chris Martin, chief executive officer at The Mix, said: "With this latest issue of #GramFam, we want to make sure all students have access to all the advice and support they need before they start their courses . . . We’re really excited to be working with CALM and Instagram." Charity Digital News

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