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Hannah Sayers

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Hannah Sayers

Associate Consultant - Legal

My main area of focus is placing legal professionals across all commercial practice areas into private practice. I place importance on building long-term relationships with my clients and candidates based on trust, excellence and consistent delivery. I come from an international sports background, and I am now channelling my passion into my professional career.

 

Outside of work, I enjoy competitive sports in particular; Netball and Gymnastics. I love the competitive nature and working within a team to victory (usually). I also enjoy socialising with friends and exploring new countries. 

 

My all-time favourite movie has to be The Lion King – you can’t beat a Disney classic!

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hannah's articles

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March 2019: Legal Movers and Shakers

Posted by Hannah Sayers

Stay up-to-date with the movers and shakers in the legal sector. Here are the key movements in March: Womble Bond Dickinson has made a headline appointment into their White Collar Crime Team, having welcomed Audrey Koh from Sidley Austin. Koh previously worked at the Serious Fraud Office. Fox Williams has recently added Rhys Griffiths to the partnership who has joined from Fieldfisher to head up the Travel Group. DWF has welcomed a new addition to their Banking & Finance Group, Brendan Slack, who has arrived from Dentons. Slack will be leading the Real Estate Finance Team in London as well as sitting in the Energy & Infrastructure Group. Akin Gump has announced an impressive double hire in the private equity funds space of Daniel Quinn and Aleksander Bakic. Quinn and Bakic will be joining the firm’s Investment Management Practice from O’Melveny & Myers. For more information about this article, or to speak to Hannah about your recruiting needs or Legal jobs in London or Nationwide, contact her on 02072696316 or hannah.sayers@pro-legal.co.uk. Back to Legal Movers & Shakers Archive >>

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How to get the most out of recruiters

Posted by Hannah Sayers

Bluntly, recruiters can often be seen as a nuisance, and the positives of building a long-term relationship with them are frequently missed. On the flip side of this, I am not suggesting you go and make relationships with all the recruiters in the market, as this will certainly dilute the many advantages of a good working relationship with your recruiter. Firstly, it is important to know how to communicate with recruiters. To do that you need to be open and honest about your current situation and your career goals - the more information you tell us the more we can help. As recruiters, we have key connections within the market and often work on projects exclusively, meaning we are protective over who we put in front of our valued clients. Building a long-term relationship with a recruiter can offer considerable value; · Exclusive job opportunities – many of the top law firms and teams opt for retained searches with leading recruiters in the market, meaning you will not hear about them elsewhere. · A key insight into the market – good recruiters have a great overview of the market and are often amongst the first to know about any movement. We also hold great knowledge in market trends and the skills that are in high demand and short supply. · Negotiate higher remuneration packages – People easily forget we have just as much invested interest as them to get the highest package possible. We know what the limits are and how hard to push negotiations, without pushing too far and posing a risk to the offer. · Provide specific advice on applications – We know our client and what they look for. We know the reasons why other candidates were unsuccessful and what experience to highlight to give you the advantage. We also know culturally what a good fit is, and what is not. Ultimately, a good legal recruiter will always look to build long-term relationships with you and will understand that the way to do this is to offer helpful and genuine advice. If you have the sense that your recruiter is not motivated to provide advice that is in your best interests, then I suggest you look to find one that is. For more information on this article or for your Legal recruiting needs, contact Hannah on 020 7269 6316 or hannah.sayers@pro-legal.co.uk.

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Legal Recruitment – The need for transparency in its process

Posted by Hannah Sayers

For years now, a primary frustration of job seekers, hiring firms and recruiters alike has been the limitations regarding transparency throughout individual hiring processes. In the legal market, this can reach from an initial application right through to discussions of forthcoming offers but can cause real harm to the health of the recruitment process if transparent communications are not upheld. Without a doubt, the main reason for this is – time. Although recruitment can be an incredibly important task when developing a team, or when you are the one looking for a job; it often gets pushed to the back of the mind behind the more urgent requirements of day to day tasks. But as is well established, we know that recruiting the right people at the right time can be an invigorating force for blending a higher performing and more productive team. From an employer perspective – transparency is key to reducing turnover: Generally speaking, interviews do not reveal the full aspect of what it is actually like to work for a firm or company. In reality, it is all too common for discussions undertaken during the interview not to align with the actual job. This is one of the glaring issues that will undoubtedly create a turnover problem. Transparency also comes to the fore in circumstances where jobseekers are the ones who are not being transparent enough. This can often result in jobseekers accepting an opportunity that will not be the right fit because they tailored their answers so that the employer heard what they wanted to hear. This reflects back to the turnover problem above and benefits neither side. The obvious remedy is to put expectations into writing at the outset and then throughout the process. This will ultimately clear up cases of he said/she said as people often hear what they want to hear, as opposed to what was actually said. And, more importantly, it will quickly uncover and allow you to fix any incongruencies between stated expectations and the realities of the job. From a jobseeker’s perspective – transparency is essential to maintain engagement in the process: If candidates are made aware from the outset, or indeed throughout the interviewing schedule, that it is likely to be an elongated process, expectations can be managed and those candidates whose need to move is urgent can be clear that although they are interested, other opportunities may likely draw them away from a particular position that they may have a preference for. Alternatively, if there is a slight delay due to hiring managers being on holiday, pulled into urgent matters or working in other locations, it is best to ensure these reasons are communicated. Nothing frustrates a process more than silence. In effect, if you were to canvas anyone you know who has undertaken a new job search, you can bet on the fact they will have at least one comment about a firm (or indeed recruiter) who simply did not provide them with adequate communication about the process and any associated delays. Ultimately, the above is not rocket science, nor is it something that is a secret to those select few HR professionals. But it is an essential element to ensure the employer/jobseeker relationship is upheld and reputations of both sides remain intact. As specialist recuiters in the legal market, the best advice we can give you, as a job seeker, is taking the time to reflect if the job is right, rather than trying to shoehorn yourself into the organisation for fear of missing out. As an employer, ensure you lay out the expectations of the process and the realities of the opportunity as best you can to reduce turnover and avoid blemishes to the reputation of the firm. For more information on this article or Legal jobs in London or Nationwide, contact Hannah on 020 7269 6316 or hannah.sayers@pro-legal.co.uk.

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