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Jessie Bains

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Jessie Bains

Associate Consultant - HR

I am an Associate Consultant at the Pro-Recruitment Group. I am currently training in all the sectors of Pro - Tax, Legal, Finance, HR and Marketing.

 

Although I have little experience in recruitment itself, I believe I have obtained transferable skills from my university degree of Psychology and my volunteering projects. I am approachable and listen to the needs of people and adapt my manner to match with them.

 

Outside of work, I like to hang around with my family and friends and discover new places to eat. I also enjoy cooking and hosting dinner parties and BBQs for my family and friends. I also have an interest in philosophy and love watching documentaries and films - my favourite movie is Shutter Island.

jessie's latest roles

  • Training Lead

    Benefits + Pension + Annual Leave

    Training Lead - Fixed Term Contract (12 Months) Farringdon Up to £40,000 Are you looking to work for a well-known organisation in the education sector? Do you have experience in designing and delivering trai...

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  • HR Business Partner

    £43000 - £46000 per annum + Benefits + Pension + Annual Leave

    HR Business Partner - Fixed Term Contract (Indefinite) Westend Up to £45,000 Are you looking to work for a well-known organisation that is the latter part of 5-year transformation plan? Would like to work fo...

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  • Human Resources Change Coordinator

    £27000 - £30000 per annum

    HR Change Coordinator Central London Up to £30,000 Are you looking to work for a well-known organisation that is the latter part of 5-year transformation plan? Would like to work for a large matrix organisat...

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What people say about Jessie

I cannot thank Pro-HR enough for their support and professionalism throughout the recruitment process. From the moment I applied through Pro-HR, they have been in touch every step of the way. It's one of many things I've found so great about Pro-HR and I look forward to working with you again in the future!


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Companies Jessie has worked with

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Tracing its origins from the Great Exhibition of 1851, the Science Museum has pioneered interactive science interpretation for more than eight decades and is the most visited museum in the UK by school groups. The group consists of 5 entities. Alongside the Science Museum (London) they also have the National Science and Media Museum (Bradford), the National Railway Museum (York), The Science and Industry Museum (Manchester) and Locomotion (Shildon).

Jisc's vision is for the UK to be the most digitally-advanced higher education, further education and research nation in the world. They provide UK universities and colleges with shared digital infrastructure and services, an example would be the Janet network.

In October 2018 like-minded housing associations Metropolitan and Thames Valley Housing formally completed a partnership to form Metropolitan Thames Valley. Metropolitan Thames Valley provides housing at different levels of affordability for people living in London, the South East, East Midlands and East of England.

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jessie's articles

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The Unique Challenges and Rewards of Working in Charity HR

Posted by Jessie Bains

Neither employment law nor candidate’s needs and expectations change from sector to sector, yet working in an HR role for a charity does come with certain challenges specific to the charity and non-profit world. Despite the challenges that come along with HR work in the third sector, there are various rewards including work-life balance, autonomy in your role and job satisfaction which undoubtedly make charity HR a career path worth considering. Our specialist charity and Not-For-Profit recruiters have provided insight into the key challenges and rewards that come with working in a charity HR role. The Challenges of Charity HR Funding & Resourcing Priorities It is not surprising that funding is one of the key challenges faced by HR professionals in the charity sector. Charities are accountable to their funders and often need to be more transparent than private sector companies, and it is important to make beneficiaries feel confident that their donations are being spent wisely and the charity’s budget is being maximised. With Not-For-Profit organisations often under the spotlight about budget spend on administration and overheads, HR professionals can find themselves having to justify spending charity budget on systems or people-related initiatives. The spending of donations on every job advert, new product, training day or induction may need justifying, and getting the message across that HR initiatives are actually highly cost-effective and will deliver savings for the charity in the long run can be a challenge. Recruitment Some HR professionals find it very easy to fill vacancies within charities, often with people who are passionate about the cause and mission of the charity and who are keen to get involved and make a difference. However, recruiting within the third sector does come with its challenges. Frontline staff, particularly staff or volunteers working with vulnerable individuals or children need to be strictly vetted. Additionally, salaries are generally lower in the charity sector which makes recruiting the right people tricky when the best talent could get higher salaries elsewhere or in the corporate sector, particularly with back-office roles like finance, legal or marketing. The key to overcoming this challenge is to develop a creative approach which focuses on building the charity’s brand and cause and highlighting non-financial benefits like flexible working, good work-life balance, learning and development opportunities, and the chance to make a real contribution. Commercial Drive More and more charities are having to take a more commercial approach in their work and charging for services that may have been previously free. This can lead to unrest among employees, particularly if they feel these changes are counter to their values, and charity HR professionals can find themselves having to work hard to communicate the necessity for commerciality to staff members, to keep up staff morale. Ethical Issues There are pressures on charities to be more transparent than ever regarding their policies and practices. Charity HR staff are faced with the challenge of finding the right balance between fulfilling the charity’s aims and making difficult people-related decisions. In other words, balancing a fair, practical and consistent method for effectively managing employees without compromising the atmosphere of passionate care which is often at the heart of the working environments of many charities. It is also very important that HR policies reflect a charity’s mission. For example, a mental health charity should undoubtedly have an excellent internal support structure and resources available for employees, and a children’s charity should have flexible working opportunities and childcare available for working parents, and policies such as these will need to be drawn out and implemented by the charity’s HR department. The Rewards of Charity HR Making a Difference Many HR professionals who end up working in the third sector do so because they have a commitment or draw to a particular cause. But regardless of this, working for a non-profit organisation can provide a great sense of job satisfaction and a feeling of making a difference in society, and therefore employees are often people who are very passionate and value-driven - which only makes the day-to-day experience of a charity HR professional an enjoyable and fulfilling one as well. Autonomy & Progression As of October 2018, there were 168,186 registered charities in the UK, and the majority of these organisations aren't able to go out to an agency for HR - everything needs to be done in-house. This means that teams are smaller - you may have a team of 3 or 4 instead of a department of 20 in a larger organisation, which in turn means that an HR charity role involves wearing lots of different hats and taking on a generalist role as opposed to a role focusing on one specialist branch of HR. This grants you autonomy in your role, more opportunity to implement change, and the chance to broaden your experience and skill set as an HR professional, and you may find there is a shorter route to progress within the organisation. Other Benefits Charity roles can sometimes be overlooked by HR professionals but no longer is the charity sector seen as the ‘poor cousin’. In reality, third sector organisations can be equally exciting and fast-paced as the commercial sector and also come with benefits like a better work-life balance and the opportunity to utilise your HR skills and experience in an organisation that is contributing towards a cause you are passionate about. For more information on this article or to speak to our specialist recruitment consultants about your next HR role in the charity sector, contact Jessie on 020 7269 6344 or jessie.bains@pro-recruitment.co.uk.

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Healthy Work-Life Balance - Advice For Employers

Posted by Jessie Bains

Maintaining a good work-life balance can be difficult, but there are ways that you, as an employer can make sure that pressures of the UK’s work culture don’t negatively affect the lives of your employees outside of work. Creating a good balance between time allocated for work and leisure is important to our overall wellbeing and happiness, yet research has shown that almost one-third of UK employees feel they don’t have a good work-life balance. The recent sophistication in personal technology has blurred boundaries between the office and home life, and this combined with the expectation in some workplaces to remain “switched on” makes it more difficult to “switch off” from work mode and have a separate life outside. However, there are various ways to achieve a positive work-life balance - we’ve listed some helpful tips in this short read below! 4 Tell-Tale Signs Of An Unhealthy Work-Life Balance Regularly working long days and feeling unhappy about the time you spend at work A study by the Mental Health Foundation found that as weekly hours increased, so did the unhappiness of employees, with 27% of respondents reporting feeling depressed, 34% feeling anxious, and 58% feeling irritable. Neglecting aspects of your life outside of work The same study also found that nearly two-thirds of respondents experienced a negative effect on their personal life as a direct result of work, including physical and mental health problems, poor relationships and poor home life. Regularly taking your work home with you If you find yourself or your employees checking work emails regularly at home, or working on the weekends this could be a sign of a poor work-life balance - research even found that 44% of employees did some form of work while on their annual leave. Constantly feeling physically or emotionally drained A noticeable increase in both physical and emotional fatigue and in your intake of caffeine, alcohol or nicotine could indicate being overworked and unable to concentrate properly at work or relax in your spare time. 4 Things You Can Do As An Employer Work-related stress costs Britain on average 10.4 million working days per year! Here are just a few examples of things that employers can do to ensure employees are maintaining a good work-life balance. Encourage activities that promote a healthy work-life balance Offer discounted gym membership or promote group lunchtime exercise to encourage employees to exercise, or encourage relaxation or meditative activities to relieve stress. Encourage a culture of openness about workload and responsibilities If employers encourage communication between themselves and employees regarding time constraints and workload, they can ensure employee’s jobs are manageable and avoid unnecessary work-related stress. Develop policies specifically related to work-life balance Consider providing better training to managers so they can spot stress and poor work-life balance, and allow staff members to attend counselling and support services during working hours (as they would for other medical appointments). Additionally, the number of companies offering flexible working arrangements to best suit employees has increased significantly in recent years, and this can make a huge difference! Last but not least, promote messages of maintaining a good work-life balance If employees are shown that a healthy work-life balance is important, employers may well find that people are happier coming to work, productivity is boosted, and people’s overall wellbeing is improved. Here at Pro, we believe a healthy work-life balance is key and we offer everyone in the Pro family flexible working arrangements as well as countless benefits, while encouraging everyone to pursue a good work-life balance. As a result of getting the environment and the culture right at Pro, the by-product is happy employees and company-wide success. For more information about this article, or to speak to Jessie about your recruiting needs, contact her on 020 7269 6344 or jessie.bains@pro-recruitment.co.uk.

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