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Nicholas Ogden

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Nicholas Ogden

Senior Consultant | Marketing | Charities & NFP

I am the founding member of Pro-Marketing and focus on Marketing, Communications and Fundraising appointments for our charities and not-for-profit division recruiting Marketing, Communications and Fundraising professionals across all levels on a permanent, contract, and interim basis. My client base consists of charity, not-for-profit and third sector organisations. 

 

Prior to joining Pro-Recruitment Group, I worked for a global recruitment agency where I specialised in permanent Marketing and Communications roles for a variety of sectors. 

 

Outside of work, you will most likely find me socialising with friends or running myself ragged on a tennis court. If I was not in recruitment, my dream occupation would be travelling the world playing tennis professionally and of course winning Wimbledon

nicholas' latest roles

  • Innovation, Evidence & Research Manager

    £46000.00 - £53000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Innovation, Evidence & Research Manager, London, Global Charity, £46,000 - £53,000 Are you a research and insight professional? Do you have a background in data analysis? Would you like to work for a global ...

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  • Director of Individual Giving

    £65000.00 - £81000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Director of Individual Giving, London, Global Charity, 2-Year Fixed Term Contract, £65,000 - £81,000 Are you an individual giving fundraising professional? Do you have a background in private philanthropy fu...

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  • Trusts Officer

    £28000.00 - £32000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Trusts Officer, London, Charity - up to £32,000 PA Are you a trusts fundraising professional? Do you have a track record of developing relationships for financial support? Would you like to work for an inter...

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  • Trusts and Major Donor Officer

    £26000.00 - £30000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Trusts and Major Donor Officer, London, Animal Welfare Charity - up to £30,000 PA Are you a trusts and major donor fundraising professional? Do you have a track record of developing relationships for financi...

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  • Corporate Partnerships Executive

    £23000.00 - £26000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Corporate Partnerships Executive London (initially home-based), Charity, £26,000 Are you a new business development professional who has a background in winning new business? Are you experienced in building ...

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  • Senior Policy Adviser

    £30000.00 - £35000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Senior Policy Adviser, Charity, £35,000, London Are you a policy adviser with experience of working in welfare? Do you have a background in creating policy position papers and identifying opportunities to in...

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  • Business Development Executive

    £20000.00 - £25000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Business Development Executive, Solihull (initially remote based), Professional Association, £25,000 Are you a business development and marketing professional? Do you have a background in delivering sales ac...

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  • Data & Marketing Analyst

    £20000 - £23000 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Data and Marketing Analyst, London (initially remote based), Regulator, £23,500 Are you and Data and Marketing Analyst professional or graduate? Do you have a basic knowledge of Google Analytics and podcasts...

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  • Digital Fundraising Manager

    £30000.00 - £36000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Digital Fundraising Manager, London (initially home-based), Health Charity, £36,000 Are you a digital fundraising professional who has a background in maximising digital income through digital channels? Are ...

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  • Temporary Marketing Manager, Arts

    £15 - £17 per hour

    Temporary Marketing Manager (Arts), London, £17 per hour via umbrella (In Scope IR35), Contract (6 months) Are you a marketing professional with experience of targeting new audiences? Do you have a marketing...

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  • Development Executive (Major Gifts)

    £28000.00 - £34000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Development Executive (Major Gifts), Education Provider, £34,000, Oxford Are you a development professional with a regular giving fundraising background? Do you have experience in securing major gifts, and m...

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  • Senior Policy and Campaigns Adviser

    £30000.00 - £35000.00 per annum + Competitive Benefits

    Senior Policy and Campaigns Adviser, Health Charity, £35,000, London Are you a policy and campaigns adviser with experience of working in welfare and with government departments? Do you have a background in ...

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What people say about Nicholas

I was first introduced to the Pro-Group in February 2018, and it has been a pleasure working with them on the recruitment of our new fundraiser officer.

Nick has been a really amazing help in getting me my fantastic new role at Starlight...


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Companies Nicholas has worked with

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Parkinson’s UK is a research and support charity dedicated to improving the quality of life for people who suffer from this condition.​ 

Cancer Research UK is one of the largest charities in the UK, using research and awareness to fight and eventually eliminate deaths through Cancer.

Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital is the largest centre for child heart surgery in the UK and one of the largest centres for heart transplantation in the world.

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nicholas' articles

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2021 Return To The Workplace

Posted by Nicholas Ogden

I revisited an article written in 2020 reflecting on what may happen to the traditional office working culture beyond the Covid-19 pandemic.  In 2020 I felt that the pandemic will eradicate the conventional office based working environment. I decided to revisit this in March 2021 by creating a poll on LinkedIn asking my network on what their employer’s plans are for post Covid-19 with regards to returning to work in an office environment. The options included: 5 days a week in the office 3-4 days a week in the office 1-2 days a week in the office Will not return to the office I would like to thank every single person who took part and voted. A total of 305 people participated, and the results have been very interesting. The overwhelming conclusion from this sample is that 50% of contributors selected that they will be returning 1-2 days a week in the office. This is a vast contrast to the 11% that chose 5 days a week back in the office. The remaining results are: 3-4 days in the office = 27% Will not return to the office = 11% It is evident from this poll that the majority (78% collectively) will only be returning to the office on a part-time basis. This is a huge shift from the traditional 5 days a week office-based environment. In my previous article I discussed that whilst the pandemic forced many businesses to work remotely, many employees found their productivity increased by working from home according to a report from Colliers. This will certainly encourage and give many employers the confidence to re-think the necessity of their office environments and closely consider the cost implications surrounding an office premise. It is widely considered that behind all these factors and why productivity may be on the rise from a remote working environment is that a high percentage of people working from home feel that it has led to a better work-life balance and this is very evident in a report released in 2020 by Ipsos MORI titled ‘Working post-COVID’. However, from this report it is very important to note that mental well-being is not much different. Mental well-being will of course be severely impacted now as we all face the challenges of lockdown, but I think key to the work environment is that many people will be missing their colleagues and the culture of their business. This is perhaps reflective on the small percentage of 11% from the poll who voted that they will not be returning to the office environment at all. Post pandemic we may see a spike in the desire for flexible workspaces with organisations like WeWork and Regus leading the way for those who may want to provide options to their staff without the severe costs of owning an office space. There are certainly still signs that we are not prepared to entirely work remotely and the return to office on a part-time basis is perhaps a healthy meet in the middle solution for many. As it stands Pro-Recruitment Group recently sent an anonymous survey around to their staff asking for their preferences on returning to work in an office environment and it is great to be an employee for an employer that are prepared to listen, be adaptable and react to the changing market. To conclude, there is no one-size-fits-all solution as some businesses will look to get rid of the traditional office environment whereas others will need it to continue and flourish. Regardless, the pandemic has provided a huge opportunity for change to the future of work which is exciting and interesting. For more information about your recruitment needs, please contact Nicholas Ogden on 020 7269 6338 or email nicholas.ogden@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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Philanthropy Fundraising is on the Rise in the UK

Posted by Nicholas Ogden

It has been nearly 11-months since the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson gave a televised address that brought in widespread lockdown measures on the 23rd of March 2020 and it is very apparent that the COVID-19 pandemic has of course provided lots of challenges and has changed and adapted the UK fundraising market.  For example, Trust Fundraisers will have had very different experiences over the past 11 months to those who work in public fundraising. Community and events teams have had to speed up the digitalisation of their culture and fundraising. It has also been interesting to see the rise and enormous opportunity for the UK to become a global centre of excellence for philanthropists and social investors.   A new report has been introduced for the UK Government, HMRC, the Charity Commission and civil society to take action now to position the UK as a leader for international philanthropy and social investment. The report, The UK as a Centre of Excellence for International Philanthropists and Social Investors, is by the Beacon Collaborative, supported by City Bridge Trust (the City of London Corporation’s charity funder) and EY. The report is based on research (including international) and shows the UK to hold strengths as a strategic base for social investors and global philanthropists.   Cath Dovey, report author and Co-Founder of Beacon Collaborative, comments: ‘Both Brexit and Covid-19 have caused challenges and uncertainty, but have also highlighted the importance of global collaboration to tackle global issues. We think that more overseas donors could be encouraged to set up foundations in the UK, supporting international needs as well as supporting UK charities and causes.’   UK charities have already demonstrated fantastic resilience during this pandemic and have been adaptable and have managed to continue moving forward by modernising their technical resources and it will be interesting to see how the market responds to this research and the opportunity for philanthropy. As it stands, Pro-Marketing has seen an increase in demand for philanthropy focused requirements in 2021 and as such are currently representing some brilliant individuals all with excellent reputations and some are immediately available.  For further information on this article or the above Philanthropy professionals, please contact Nicholas Ogden on 020 7269 6338 or email nicholas.ogden@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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Can Community Fundraising Capitalise on the Public’s Interest in their Local Community?

Posted by Nicholas Ogden

Last summer, I wrote an article reflecting on the first national lockdown due to COVID-19 and discussed the impacts that the pandemic was having on fundraising for the voluntary sector. Take a look here. In 2020 I felt that the initial lockdown and self-isolation enabled people to think about vulnerable people and causes in their communities. In turn, I hoped that this awareness and spirit would continue post COVID-19 to benefit the voluntary sector. Looking at this in March 2021 and although we are not post the COVID-19 pandemic yet, it would appear that this community mindset is becoming more apparent. According to research recently released by The National Lottery Community Fund the pandemic has helped to reignite people’s interest in their local community with three in ten (30%) planning to get more involved in 2021. The same research showed that across the UK almost seven in ten people (69%) feel like they are a part of their local community, with about a third acknowledging that COVID has increased their sense of belonging (35%). I think that because many organisations have had to shift their office culture to remote working to adhere to Government guidelines this has really helped people to recognise and appreciate their health, surroundings, and local community. The research really demonstrates the growing rise of attention to community wellbeing for 2021. This is hopefully positive news for local charities as well as community fundraising which has arguably been one of the hardest hit forms of fundraising during the pandemic due to a high proportion of community fundraising relying on events as a large source of income. I very much hope we continue to build on this community support mindset and that many worthwhile charities are able to capitalise and benefit. As it stands, Pro-Marketing of Pro-Recruitment Group is currently representing some fantastic community fundraisers all with excellent community fundraising strategy backgrounds and some are immediately available. For further information on this article or the above Community Fundraising professionals, please contact Nicholas Ogden on 020 7269 6338 or email nicholas.ogden@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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60 Seconds With: Laura Savory, Deputy Director of Community Fundraising at Great Ormond Street Hospital

Posted by Nicholas Ogden

Laura Savory is Deputy Director of Community Fundraising at Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity (GOSH Charity). Laura has worked for the organisation in a variety of roles in its community and events team for the last ten years. Prior to this, she worked in the fundraising team at Sue Ryder. Laura speaks with Nicholas Ogden at Pro-Marketing about her role at GOSH and sharing her advice to anyone looking to move into the Not-for-Profit sector Tell me about yourself, how your career started and what you do at GOSH Charity At the start of my career I’d planned to work in sustainable tourism, but the role I’d lined up sadly fell through and instead I started working as a sales executive. From this I quickly learnt I was quite good at making money, but that I’d like to do it for a cause I cared about. I applied for lots of jobs in the charity sector, but struggled to get a foot in the door, until I met the head of events at Sue Ryder, where I started volunteering. I loved it and went from volunteering to being their challenge events manager where I did everything from helping the charity embark upon its first ever London Marathon with five gold bond places, through to building the national challenge events portfolio. An opportunity came up at GOSH Charity to manage the challenge events programme and I took it. I grew the challenge’s income from one million pounds to four million pounds, a portfolio that included our biggest mass participation event - RBC Race for the Kids. I was then promoted to manage the community events team which I found to be a baptism of fire as I quickly learnt that community events is quite a different space to challenge events! But I loved it, and I was subsequently able to move into a role managing the whole department, a post I’ve been in for around four years now. Why community fundraising? It was partly luck as it was the opportunity that presented itself to me, but I’m so happy it did as this feels like an area of fundraising that really suits me. I am an extrovert (ENTP if you are interested), I enjoy getting stuck in, I really like talking to people and I’m also motivated by the idea of supporting others to meet their own goals, which ultimately is what this area of fundraising is all about. It’s members of the public who are pushing themselves to do something to raise funds for the hospital, using their time and energy, and I find that very inspiring. In a crowded market, what does GOSH Charity do to stand out, how is it different/unique/special in the market? As fundraisers we are lucky that the areas we are raising money towards become very tangible; you can stand in the hospital buildings that transform the care children receive, you see the state of the art piece of equipment, you get the chance to talk to staff whose posts are funded by charitable giving and you see the impact of their work. You can touch it, feel it, smell it. I think at GOSH Charity, that’s something we really appreciate. From a personal perspective what really stands out to me about Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) is the breadth of the work it does. It’s caring for children with the rarest and most complex conditions, and that inherently places it in a very unique position. I grew up watching the Wishing Well Appeal, which raised funds for the hospital, and now I’ve worked for the charity that supports the hospital for a quarter of my life. It’s a very special place. I think in theory it would be easy to lose sight of how special it as after being here for so long, but you just don’t. How big is your team and what advice would you give anyone applying to be part of the team? In terms of our charity’s profile and how much we try and raise, we’re a relatively large organisation. But in terms of our staff, we are relatively small; before social distancing measures we all worked from one office five minutes away from the hospital itself, and it’s always been really easy to pop over and chat to a colleague to get something done. My team is one department in a fundraising directorate that includes individual giving, philanthropy, corporate partnerships and special events, so there’s quite a breadth. We’re hardworking and professional, but also very supportive and caring, which I’m really proud of. My advice – you need to be someone who’s prepared to talk to people, to pick up the phone or to go to the hospital to meet in person. I also need you to think more broadly than community fundraising, because the supporter you are working with is not one dimensional. We need to see every opportunity we can and think about how to build a really positive relationship with the fundraisers we’re supporting. At the end of the day, it’s all about people and the relationships we have with them. Putting the supporter at the heart of everything we do is really important. How would your team describe you? Determined. Informal. Driven, in that I have high expectations.  I hope they would say I am accessible. We’re all on a journey, I’m not perfect, and I’ve definitely grown – in the last few years in particular. I would hope that a colleague answering this question now might say something different that they would a few years ago, which would reflect my development as a leader and a colleague. What advice would you give to your younger self? Pause, slow down and forgive yourself a bit more. I have a habit of rushing in! I think my biggest piece of advice is that it’s ok to be vulnerable, you don’t have to know everything, and it’s ok to ask for help. How do you think the COVID-19 pandemic has changed or adapted fundraising? I think it depends on what type of fundraising you’re talking about. For example trust fundraisers will have a very different experience of change to those who work in public fundraising. In community and events, we’ve had to pivot everything that we do. We were quite a digitally focused team before the pandemic, but it has sped up digitisation of our culture and fundraising. And as a sector we have to catch up quickly, because the pandemic is not only changing how we work, it’s changing how the public thinks of and engages with charities. For example, I think the pace at which we will now move towards a cashless society is speeding up, and that poses big questions for community cash based fundraising. There has also been a big shift towards supporting hyperlocal causes, this will require larger national charities to really challenge themselves on how they demonstrate impact and engage people at such a micro level. The surge of mutual aid groups through the pandemic was not only really heartening to see from a personal point of view, but was fascinating from a professional perspective.     What advice would you give to someone looking to make a move into a not-for-profit organisation from another sector (especially during this pandemic)? People are often pleasantly surprised by how values driven the sector is. I think we all acknowledge the impact that Covid-19 has had on fundraising, and so for many organisations it will be a tough few months ahead. With that in mind, my advice would be to choose a cause that you are really passionate about. If you’re moving into the sector it’s because you want to see change happen and at this time the change could be really meaningful. If you feel like you’re really part of something by working towards something you really care about, it’ll be much easier. If you were not working for a charity or not-for-profit organisation, what would the dream be? I think I’d be doing something outdoorsy, where I could be hands on and get stuck in. I did once consider training to become a landscape gardener! Any final words of advice for people looking to progress their career in the charity sector? Right now, be adaptable. Be willing to try new things, be willing to explore different avenues in fundraising. I think we will all be stronger for having a diverse and wide range of skills, so say yes to opportunities. Thanks for your time, and as a little treat for all of our readers - do you have any guilty pleasures you can share with us? I don’t think pleasures should be guilty! I’m also an oversharer, so nothing is really that secret. At a push, perhaps I would say watching or listening to a true crime documentary whilst snaffling a bag of crisps. It turns out I am fascinated by serial killers (hopefully because they are very different to me!), and I do a love a frazzle. For more information on this article, or to find out how you can get involved in Pro-Marketing’s 60 Second interview series, contact Nicholas Ogden on 020 7269 6338 or nicholas.ogden@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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60 Seconds with: Benaifer Bhandari, Chief Executive of Hopscotch Asian Women’s Centre

Posted by Nicholas Ogden

Benaifer Bhandari joined Hopscotch Asian Women’s Centre as their Chief Executive in November 2018, prior to this she worked various roles at the breastfeeding support charity La Leche League GB. Benaifer speaks with Nicholas Ogden and Pro-Marketing about working at Hopscotch Asian Women’s Centre where their mission is to enable BAME women to actively participate in society and make informed decisions that enable them to achieve their aspirations. Additionally Benaifer, kindly offers interview tips, and shares her views on how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed/adapted fundraising. Tell me about yourself, how your career started and what you do at Hopscotch Asian Women’s Centre? I started as CEO in November 2018 and it was a monumental moment for me. As a BAME woman, the door to CEO roles doesn't always open easily and I fell in love with Hopscotch in my preparation for my interview. It's a remarkable organisation that is built on compassion and sound governance practices. My previous charity, La Leche League GB, was the same. I served here as a trustee and as a director of the accreditation department. This involved heaps of international work, including complex policy writing which would serve the very different parts of the world where mothers breastfeed. Now at Hopscotch I have the privilege of working with colleagues who are experts in their own fields of health and social care, domestic violence, employment and welfare advice. We also have experts working with older and young BAME women. It's inspiring to be surrounded by such high skill levels and keeps me motivated to keep Hopscotch going fiscally and keep our work growing. We have an excellent reputation locally for being a one stop shop for women who need specialist BAME support, and we are now expanding around London to be able to share our knowledge and skills to help even more isolated and underserved women and girls. How do Hopscotch Asian Women’s Centre differentiate themselves in the market?  We are unique in the holistic approach we have. We run services which, individually, may be replicated elsewhere, but our centre puts all our services together and we work with each service user at her pace, according to her ability and motivations and working with the barriers she in particular faces. We move her seamlessly between services as she feels ready to disclose her needs and at all times being respectful of what it means to be a disadvantaged BAME woman in London. An example is a service user (B) who came to us seeking urgent support after surviving domestic abuse. Our advocate was there for B in her hour of need and in the weeks and months to come, making sure she was safe, fed and plugged into the statutory bodies needed. Our welfare advocate stepped in, as needed, for the housing and welfare issues which came up. In time B was able to express her desire to work (which previously she hadn’t been allowed to) and our employment development team supported her in improving her English and helped her work on her CV writing and interview skills. Eventually B was ready to step into the job market and chose to interview with our own Homecare service and was successful! She is now working flexibly as a care worker and having her own income for the first time in her life. Our Better Employment advisor is now working with her to develop her skills further with workshops which B can attend around her care work, so that she avoids the in-work poverty trap so many Londoners face and can start to dream big and live the life she deserves. How big is your team and what advice would you give anyone applying to be part of the team? We have a 23-person office-based team and 50 incredible care workers. We are nearly always recruiting, as grant funding comes in and we are always looking for more care workers to join our expanding Homecare service. We have a great social media presence where you will find all our opportunities and our website www.hopscotchawc.org.uk also has lots of information on how to apply. Always consider getting in touch first, have an informal chat with us so we can get to know you even before we’ve received your application. That’s a sure way of getting us excited to receive your email. How would your team describe you? This is awkward to respond to! OK, so we are accredited by various bodies like the Care Quality Commission and Advice Quality Standard. Here are bits from our last Matrix (Employment auditors) report:- “Leadership and management is another area of strength. A number of staff and partners commented on the fresh energy and new approach brought by the new CEO” “Increased networking, and with a background in counselling, an in depth understanding of women, but also how working with them can bring stresses” “A breath of fresh air, loads of new ideas, already adding things to our programme”.  “The new composition of the Board has led to a timely review of Hopscotch’s vision, mission and objectives. Staff described being given relative autonomy; but it was also clear that there is a structured framework of meetings now in place at both manager and practitioner level to oversee performance” “I think we have finally got there in terms of managing things, the right level of oversight” What advice would you give to your younger self? Don’t always listen to your teachers. Absorb the positive things one or two of them said to you over those 12 years. The horrid things said to you consistently are all about them and not you. You will find yourself attracting inspiring people soon enough and they will help you find your passion for working with those in need. When you interview someone for your organisation, what is the first thing you notice about a person and what does it tell you? Their smile and their answer to “Why Hopscotch?” Both tell me how comfortable they are expressing their connection to our charity and how they might fit into the family vibe we work hard at maintaining. How do you think the COVID-19 pandemic has changed or adapted fundraising? It has put Hopscotch and our many peer organisations at risk of closure. Through sheer hard work we have fundraised crisis money to be able to keep going until March 21 – but what happens when that money runs out? How do we replace the losses incurred in Homecare, our social enterprise, because of C-19? How do we continue our important work of reaching women who are unreachable by others? This uncertainty has meant a more ferocious fundraising strategy has been needed, including spending a lot of time thinking of creative ways to raise unrestricted income. What advice would you give to someone looking to make a move into a not-for-profit organisation from another sector (especially during this pandemic)? It’s not for everyone – you need to have a combination of empathy, determination and big picture vision. If this is you, there are lots of great platforms where jobs are advertised and then for charities like Hopscotch who cannot afford these platforms, call directly or go to the website and apply! There is crisis funding around, there are programmes starting or extending their run, so there are jobs out there right now – mostly only for the few months until the funding runs out, but it’s a great way to start. For those who can, I always say the best way to test the water and find out if the third sector is for you, is to volunteer. If you were not working for a charity or not-for-profit organisation, what would the dream be? I would work with children from disadvantaged backgrounds for whom either school let them down or isn’t the right place. I home educate my lads, so I have experience of another – non-institutional – way of learning where children are empowered and motivated and have the time to learn important skills like conflict resolution and socialising with people of all ages and abilities. Any final words of advice for people looking to progress their career in the charity sector? The charity sector is filled with people who have to manage strict governance and tight finances, but who also think outside the box. Part of that is having the capacity to hire those who are passionate and have skills beyond academics. It’s a beautiful place to grow as a person, navigate life with like-minded people and have the opportunity to give hope – which could be directly to those in need or it could be indirectly by helping the organisation flourish. The third sector is surprisingly fast-paced, as funding comes and goes, needs fluctuate and people who care move about at quite a speed! Find your passion, work out what sector that fits into and then find the organisation that understands the needs of that sector. Volunteer with them until they have the space to take you on and then fly! Thanks for your time, and as a little treat for all of our readers - do you have any guilty pleasures you can share with us? I am known for my views and actions against patriarchy but LOVE ‘Say Yes To The Dress’. Sshhh, don’t tell anyone! For more information on this article, or to find out how you can get involved in Pro-Marketing’s 60 Second interview series, contact Nicholas Ogden on 020 7269 6338 or nicholas.ogden@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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COVID-19 Lockdown Reflection – Fundraising for The Voluntary Sector

Posted by Nicholas Ogden

On 23 March 2020 the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson gave a televised address that brought in widespread lockdown measures. Four months on from that, the UK has now found itself in a position where some are returning to work, organisations are exploring flexible working measures more than ever before, and the fundraising and voluntary sector had an urgent surge in demand. Here is a brief reflection of how the fundraising landscape has changed, and the effects of the pandemic on future giving. History has shown that in times of crisis people often pull together to become their best selves, this was reflected by the March 2020 recruitment for NHS Volunteers to help COVID-19 being suspended as more than three times the expected number of people signed up. These responses were impressive and Ruth May, Chief Nursing Officer for England was “absolutely bowled over” by this. During Lockdown  Lockdown and self-isolation have enabled people to think about vulnerable people and causes in their communities. Hopefully, in turn this awareness and spirit will continue post COVID-19 to benefit the voluntary sector. Captain Sir Thomas Moore took donations in the run up to his 100th Birthday, in aid of the NHS Charities Together Covid-19 Urgent Appeal. His efforts were a beacon of hope despite everyone’s hardships. With a target of raising £500,000, he had phenomenally raised almost £38million with over 1.5million donations, breaking records on JustGiving, the global online platform for charitable giving. However, research from Charity Aid Foundation found that although sentiment to give was high, 12% of Charities did not have the digital technology in place to collect funds online. As cash remains the most common way to give to charity (53%), many not-for-profit organisations who already had digital donation platforms in place, found a spike during the March and April months of 2020 found a spike in digital donations, whilst some reported a drop in donations due to lack of technical resources. Revolut  has revealed figures highlighting a swell in charitable giving among UK consumers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The average amount given through Revolut Donations increased across all age groups during lockdown, by an average of 59%. Those in older age brackets gave significantly more than they did prior to lockdown, with the biggest rise seen in the 50+ age group, where donation amounts soared by 147%. Those aged 41-45 increased their average donation amount by 91% and those between 46-50 by 75%. But it wasn’t just older consumers who gave more to charity during lockdown, Gen Z increased donation amounts by an average of 13%, those aged 26-30 by 8% and those aged 31-35 by 23%. Post-Pandemic  Post COVID-19 we should all continue to support vulnerable people and causes in our communities. Charities will learn a lot from this period to catalyse their efforts going forward. With 18% or charities reporting that they see the COVID-19 pandemic as an opportunity to modernise into newer technical resources, many are now accelerating their plans to shift their fundraising towards online efforts Without doubt, this lockdown has hit many financially, but research from Opinium tells us that many charitable supporters encouragingly will be providing the same level or more support going forward once lockdown is lifted and life starts to return to normality. Of those that are donating more than usual currently, 12% say they will donate more money to charity when they start to return to normality, while three in four (76%) will continue donating at the same level that they are currently. Similarly, of those that are donating more than usual, one in five (20%) say they will do this more when things return to normal, while 70% will continue to donate at their current level. Kate Whiffen, Senior Research Manager at Opinium Research commented: Charities are currently going through some challenging times due to Covid-19... Knowing how charities can adapt and move forward in these times is key. We have heard some very positive stories from the public as to what makes them support more now and what would do in the future, but it’s the challenge of communicating and educating the long term impact Covid-19 will have on the charity sector and learning from new initiatives that have been successful that would work in the future. Charities will need to think of innovative ways of Marketing to support their fundraising efforts, with many events being cancelled, and cash donations becoming less regular,  smaller charities have had a stronger recovery than the larger charities, which have been more greatly affected due to those wider event cancellations. Jo Barnett, Executive Director at Virgin Money Giving said: "Many charities have been impacted hard with reduced income during COVID-19...We’ve seen some fantastic ways people have been raising money for charity during lockdown, and there are lots of ways people are able to fundraise as we emerge from lockdown when the traditional routes are still not open to them. From virtual pub quizzes, running 5k in your back garden or taking part in a virtual 50k bike ride, we encourage people to continue to do what they can do to raise money to support the charities close to their hearts." To conclude, this period has been a pressing but eye-opening time for many organisations and people alike. NFP teams are exploring alternatives to raise funds, social media has seen a surge in charitable cause posts. Now more than ever, those who were not already regularly donating are now supporting causes closer to home and those affected by the pandemic. Who knows what else is to come in the second half of this year? However, let’s continue to pull our efforts together to help the most vulnerable in the hardest times. If you are looking for ideas or like to share your thoughts on this, please give Nicholas Ogden a call on 020 7269 6338 or email me nicholas.ogden@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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Is this the end of office culture? What happens post COVID-19?

Posted by Nicholas Ogden

It is widely believed that conventional office culture will not be the same beyond the Coronavirus pandemic. Here we take a closer look at what experts suggest this might look like. This pandemic will eradicate the traditional working environment. Here is what some organisations, leaders and reports suggest. Jes Staley CEO of Barclays said “The notion of putting 7,000 people in the building may be a thing of the past” Colliers found in a survey of 4,000 people working from home that 73% thought that their productivity was the same or higher, while 76% thought their work/life balance had improved. 81% wanted to carry on working from home for one day a week or more Keith Froud, Managing Partner of Eversheds Sutherland stated that they will “redirect more on technology rather than office space” Research from Upwork, a US freelancing firm, researched that by 2028, 73% of all departments will have remote workers. Today, millennials and Gen Z workers make up only 38% of the workforce, but in 2028, they’ll amount to 58%. So there will only be changes to come as the ‘New Norm’ makes its appearance. Organisations that operate with large corporate spaces will certainly need to think about the foreseeable future and will need to prioritise adhering to Government guidelines to keep their employees safe. However, businesses that can provide appropriate safety measures and contingency plans for their staff also have many reasons why they should continue to invest in office space and why larger organisations may need to reassess post pandemic before permanently abolishing office spaces. Why some businesses shouldn’t eradicate their office space and environments Melanie Phillips, journalist for The Times, comments that “Zoom shuts away the essence of humanity” and that senses are removed (and are irreproducible). These are key disadvantages for any businesses that are people focused Brodie Boland Associate Partner of McKinsey & Company suggests that remote working does not enable some people to get needed mentorship or help facilitate casual, unplanned but important conversations with colleagues Paul McDonald a contributor to Forbes discusses in detail in his article ‘Why A Positive Company Culture Is Especially Critical Today’ about organisations needing to create an inclusive and positive corporate culture. For many this can take the form of a fun place to work with development and social offerings that cannot be replaced remotely. Happiness is widely considered amongst many reports the most important factor for generating high productivity and therefore business leaders will need to take this into account when thinking about why their employees come to work for their business Here at Pro-Recruitment Group We are discovering in our sector that many are missing the office environment, shared working space and the buzzing team culture. As it stands, Pro-Recruitment Group is thrilled to be opening the office on a trial part-time basis in August, allowing the team the option to voluntarily come in on a rota whilst allowing for flexibility in hours. As part of this trial, Pro is generously reimbursing all employees’ travel costs and has already followed government guidelines with risk assessments and implemented strong safety measures. As an organisation we are delighted to be returning. Here is our advice to employers looking to reintroduce employees into the workplace. To conclude, there is no one-size-fits-all solution as some businesses will look to get rid of the traditional office environment whereas others will need it to continue and flourish. Regardless, the pandemic has provided a huge opportunity for change to the future of work which is exciting and interesting. For more information about your recruitment needs, please contact Nicholas Ogden on 020 7269 6338 or email nicholas.ogden@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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60 Seconds With: Richard Davidson, Chief Executive at Sarcoma UK

Posted by Nicholas Ogden

Richard Davidson joined Sarcoma UK as their Chief Executive in July 2018, and has been working in the third sector for more than two decades. His previous roles include Director of Engagement at Anthony Nolan and Director of Policy and Public Affairs at Cancer Research UK. Richard is Chairman of Emilia Clarke’s charity, SameYou, which is dedicated to increasing access to rehabilitation services after brain injury and stroke for young people, and he is also a board member of SPAEN, the European network of sarcoma patient advocacy groups. Richard speaks with Nicholas Ogden at Pro-Marketing about working at Sarcoma UK, offers interview tips, and shares advice for those looking to progress their career in the charity sector. Tell us about yourself, how your career started and what you do at Sarcoma UK? I have worked in the voluntary sector throughout my career in public affairs, policy, marketing, fundraising and communications. I worked at CRUK, Anthony Nolan and now for a smaller organisation, Sarcoma UK as Chief Executive. How do Sarcoma UK differentiate themselves in the market?  We are the only organisation in the UK that covers all types of Sarcoma, funds research, raises awareness and provides information and support. How big is your team and what advice would you give anyone applying to be part of the team? We could consider ourselves to be small but mighty (22 people in total). I always look for staff who really care about the beneficiaries and want to make a difference to the lives of people with cancer. How would your team describe you? I have no idea, but I would think they would say I am supportive, energetic and creative. What advice would you give to your younger self? When I started out, I worried too much. I would now advise myself not to. When you interview someone for your organisation, what is the first thing you notice about a person and what does it tell you? I always think you can tell quite quickly if someone has passion and desire, which is important to me. What personal and soft skills are most important when working in the charity sector? I look for empathy and an ability to relate well to people. You need to be able to adapt to other people’s styles and approaches. What advice would you give to someone looking to make a move into a not-for-profit organisation from another sector? Do it! People from other sectors have a great deal to offer, but do not assume that things will be easier and less pressurised. Often more is at stake in the voluntary sector. If you were not working for a charity, what would the dream be? I feel I will always be connected to charities, but I would love to live in an Italian cottage with space, fine weather, food and wine. A dog would complete the idyllic scene! Any final words of advice for people looking to progress their career in the charity sector? Consider what you feel passionate about and choose roles that allow you to use that energy to make a difference. Thanks for your time, and as a little treat for all of our readers - do you have any guilty pleasures you can share with us? I have a penchant for a Subway steak sandwich. ​ For more information on this article, please contact Nicholas Ogden on 020 7269 6338 or nicholas.ogden@pro-recruitment.co.uk.

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