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Pat Keogh

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Pat Keogh

Managing Director - Group

I am one of the founders and Managing Director of the Pro-Recruitment Group which was formed in 2007. As well as running the business I also still recruit at Partner level and team moves for a small number of clients.

I have an extensive network in the tax market both in practice and in-house having recruited for this specialism for over 20 years. 

I worked with the legal firm Fladgate Fielder before joining KPMG in their tax department. After several years of practising tax, I decided to join the world of recruitment where I joined a large national recruitment firm. It was then in 2007 that I founded the Pro-Recruitment Group.

Outside of work I am an avid traveller and being half-Thai I have a real passion for the Far East. I am also a keen snowboarder, hockey player at Barnes Hockey Club, Chelsea FC supporter and dad to a beautiful boxer dog called Tess. If I was not in recruitment I would own a BBQ smoke pit restaurant.

pat's articles

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Pat Keogh - Pro Group - October 2020 Update

Posted by Pat Keogh

Here is a quick update on the markets we cover from Pro-Recruitment Group's Managing Director, Pat Keogh. It's no surprise that all five of our markets, tax, legal, finance, marketing and HR slowed down earlier this year, but we were really encouraged when we brought everyone back fully in September, there were clear signs and green shoots across all five divisions. It was slightly stunted when we had to go back to a work-from-home strategy, but we are hoping that will lift soon. That said, all markets are still responding well. A lot of organisations are taking the opportunity to obnboard remotely. There are a few clients who are more gung-ho than others, and some a recruiting in serious numbers, which is pleasing to see. On the candidate side, unfortunately there are a lot who are now immediately available, through no fault of thier own, but due to current market conditions. There are plenty of skilled professionals who are immediately available, so its a great time to recruit if that is your strategy. We are producing a monthly market-tracker which will allow us to keep you informed of recruiting trends, covering professionals seeking new roles and opportunities available on the market. Do sign up to receive our newsletters. We haven't seen a single market without an increase, understandably it has been relatively flat market since March, but more recently we are seeing monthly increases in jobs being registered with us, which is very encouraging. The approach we have taken as a business is that we are looking to help kick-start the economy. Of course, whilst balancing the safety of our teams and those around us. We are currently working remotely, whilst allowing those who prefer to safely come into the office the opportunity to do so. This is paramount in us ensuring we are servicing all of our clients and candidates alike. I hope this gives you a bit of an insight into where the market is at. Feel free to pick up the phone to me directly, I am more than happy to share market intel and looking to share this information as regularly as we can. We are always here and our lines of communications are always here to help you with your reruitment needs. For now, stay safe and speak soon!

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5 Tips to Improve your Mental Wellbeing - Finding the Diamonds in the Dirt

Posted by Pat Keogh

In reflection of Weld Mental Health Day on 10th October, its been highlighte that mental health awareness deserves greater attention in 2020, for the level of paradox which this year has brought if nothing else. While we have never been more accessible due to remote working technologies, we have never been this far apart by prohibitions on togetherness. While the corporate awareness for mental health seems to be higher than ever, it is difficult to imagine civilised working conditions which could bring more widespread lows. Equally, with all the negativity and threat brought by 2020 so far, there are opportunities for us to enter next year in some ways perhaps better than we started. Here are some ways we take the negatives of this year to better our mental wellbeing: 1 - Go Back to Bed The absence of the 9-5 office presenteeism has provided the working world with an opportunity for us to look after our natural rhythms once again. The physical, mental and emotional benefits of proper sleep cannot be understated. Neuroscientist Matthew Walker gives a fascinating account of the scientific revolution currently underway, away from disease, medication, road accidents, sports injuries and poor memory, to the good old-fashioned prescription of learning to have a good night’s sleep. His insight, knowledge and passion for the subject is frankly contagious and this interview comes highly recommended for anyone not yet bought into the astounding importance of getting proper shut-eye every night. Dr Walker explains we naturally have different sleeping patterns which we need to be aware of and cater to. Evolutionary theory tells us that having ‘night owls’ and ‘morning larks’ helped our survival in tribal years by minimising the time spent at night unconscious and vulnerable to threats such as predation. However, the traditional early-bird hours of the corporate world have massively disadvantaged the ‘night owls’ amongst us, who naturally feel, think, exercise and live much better when they sleep later and wake up later. Further to increased remote working, if there is one positive which the corporate world can take from the lockdown, it would be flexibility in staggered working hours. Having staggered commute and entry/exit times from the office can help us restore the balance on our body clock demands between the owls and larks in the office. If we are talking about optimising the body clock and mindset, proper sleep comes first. Whereas sleep was once understood as a ‘third pillar’ after diet and physical exercise, sleep is now becoming more widely accepted as the baseline to healthy living, even with priority beyond such factors. Alongside the chance to restore proper physical activity levels, working from home gives us the opportunity to rid ourselves of screens before bedtime. Walker advises we set an alarm for sleeping and waking times, turning off all the screens which have already filled our days and picking up a good book. For those who believe they can sleep 4-5 hours a night and wake up the next day without serious short-term and long-term cost to their bodies, minds, memory, and general abilities – think again. “Expressed as a percentage and rounded to a whole number, the number of people who can operate normally at under eight hours of sleep is zero”. Learn more here. 2 - Befriend Your Stress Learning to befriend our friend goes a long way in not exacerbating cortisol levels. This is contrasted to further stressing about how stressed we are – a nasty feedback loop to fall into. Stress exists on a physical level to help us survive. Upon realisation of a threat, our heart rates increase and blood flows to the relevant body areas in preparation of ‘fight or flight’. Periodic stress has remained in the gene pool by helping us avoid being eaten or beaten. In this way, stress is very much our ally. Having said that, we all need a break from even the best of friends from time to time. The contemporary, chronic stress of remaining in a tense ‘fight or flight’ mode in front of the computer screen all day needs to be managed. No account on stress management should be without at least a mention for mindfulness, which advocates us to welcome bodily emotions such as stress. The concept of mindfulness can be put figuratively: if to imagine our thoughts and feelings as a river with constant flow, to be mindful is to sit on the riverbank and observe the current, rather than fighting upstream or being dragged wherever the current takes us. Put literally, it is better to observe stress impartially, than it is to fight against or act on every stressful thought. The underpinning principle of mindfulness is simple to phrase, but not to realise: to become aware and accepting of our thoughts, feelings, and emotions as they occur. Becoming closer to our automatic mental processes in this way affords us a level of detachment from them, which in turn, greater choice for which impulses, feelings and behaviours to follow. Mindfulness has been a growing area of attention in the west over the past 20 years or so, with an increased focus and praise for mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) interventions in educational and workplace settings. You can find an accessible, excellent starting point for a self-guided, eight-week MBSR course here, by Penman, Williams & Williams. The second aspect of befriending stress involves treating your stress with kindness. Dr David Hamilton argues for empathy and kindness as the physiological opposite of stress. Hamilton gives an emphatic account and walks through the science of kindness and empathy, illustrating the beneficial outcomes for not only the receivers, but also the givers and observers of kindness. It is peculiar that in times of crisis we quickly raise the barriers in the interests of self-preservation, just when the need for kindness and empathy is at its greatest. Looking out for ourselves often comes to the detriment of others (recalling the image of empty supermarket shelves), though there is certainly a balance to be found. The good news is that Dr. Hamilton believes the behaviours and benefits of kindness, empathy and compassion can be learned and realised. Go out of your way by practicing just one kind deed a day which you would usually do without. 3 - Talk About Your Problems Simply talking about our problems is an everyday therapy that we should all have access to. Between cognitive behavioural therapies (CBT), psychotherapies, counselling, and a variety of other psychologically-led interventions for mental wellbeing, there is a roughly equal outcome for each across a range of mental health conditions. In other words, regardless of the form of therapy used, people tend to make similar recovery rates. While this ‘equivalence paradox’ might seem to discredit the individual therapies as claiming a better approach, an underlying mechanism to each of these wellbeing approaches might be accessible to all of us – perhaps by simply talking about our problems. Love him or hate him, the increasingly controversial clinical psychologist Jordan Peterson offers an interesting insight to the equivalence paradox (though not named specifically) in his bestselling book “12 Rules for Life: an Antidote to Chaos”. Peterson reasons that much of the time we consider ourselves to be ‘thinking’, we are merely ‘experiencing’ the world in passive mode. The difference, as he puts forward, is found in language and dialogue. True, sophisticated thought involves reasoning through issues with words, whether spoken or silent. Simply verbalising our concerns helps us to mentally define problems and reason through them purposefully. Sigmund Freud famously used drew on the power of speech in his ‘free association’ technique. This involved instructing people to speak aloud by themselves for an hour or so, while he sat back and listened and smoked his pipe, relentlessly. The central message here: putting our worries, concerns and problems into words helps us reason them through and arrive at acceptance and meaning, if not a solution. 4 - Face your Fears The stoic practice of premeditation malorum – or ‘the premeditation of evils’ – dates back thousands of years. The naysayer who tells you not to spend time dwelling about what might go wrong clearly never picked up Seneca for their bedtime reading. Seneca, amongst other stoics, advocated for listing the terrible things which might happen to us. The reasoning here is that rationalising our fears helps us in addressing them to the best of our ability and leaving little justification for further worry. A working example is in the interview context. I actively encourage the candidates I work with to list as many weaknesses/disadvantages they can see to their candidacy, prior to the big interview. The intention here is to deal with any underlying anxieties which arise and put our best foot forward. Some of these self-perceived weaknesses are agreed as unrealistic once thought through. Others are realistic but are topics we can prepare for. The remainder may be realistic though completely uncontrollable, at which point the stoic interviewee would find solace in having covered their blindsides. Tim Ferris gives an excellent account on the premeditation of evils here, alongside making a case for why defining your fears is of comparable importance to goal-setting. Stoicism aside, a wealth of literature exists on the virtues of facing our fears more generally – big or small. Even at work, we each have mundane fears to face which will sap us of our energy if we let them intimidate us from the corner of our ‘to-do list’, untouched. Brian Tracey offered the metaphor of ‘eating the frog’. Tracey describes the ‘frog’ as the dreaded task each of us come across at work each day. This frog will sit on the plate in front of us, staring and croaking continuously until we just swallow it. Often, the fear of eating this frog is much worse than the taste, and the satisfaction of finally clearing your plate, is more rewarding than the creature was disgusting. Peculiarly, it is often the things we fear which we need to do the most, for our own wellbeing. 5 - Find Meaning Have you ever tried keeping a gratitude journal? There are two rules: Write down 5 things you are grateful for, every morning and every evening. Only list a reason for gratitude once (for what memory will allow). When first listing the obvious things which we are most immediately grateful for, this exercise initially seems easy and a little pointless. Day by day however, the practice becomes more demanding. Within a week, you end up scouring for the “diamonds in the dirt” – the things we usually take for granted. While there are a number of benefits found in gratitude writing generally, I have found the benefit of specific exercise as training the mind toward a mentality of abundance. In a short space of time, I found my thoughts automatically darting toward find the positives instead of negatives in a situation, and similarly toward the opportunities instead of the threats. Perhaps we should be grateful that we have negatives and threats for us to do something with in the first place. At length, Peterson explains the chaos of pain and suffering in life as an inevitability which we will all face at some point. To live with the expectation of continual happiness is downright precarious. Inevitably, something is guaranteed to go wrong. Peterson makes the compelling case that it is our sense of purpose, or worthwhile cause, is what gets us through life (and the suffering) with it still being meaningful. What do you live and work ‘for’ today? If money was no object (for some, this is the case today – and for all, this was once the case), would you choose to continue making the contribution to the world which you currently do? ‘Purpose’ is distinct from a ‘goal’ or ‘objective’, as the former implies that what we are working towards is something worthwhile which will have a positive impact in some way. Some are lucky enough to have a job they find meaningful, while some need to squint a little to arrive at some purpose to what they do. More than a few sacrifice a would-be purpose altogether to keep our bank accounts afloat. We can take this chance to step back at what we are contributing towards, alongside whether it might be time for us to change for the better. From these five tips, we have seen some examples of how we can make positive from a less than ideal situation: fixing our sleeping patterns, befriending our stress, verbalising our problems, facing our fears and finding a purpose. Each of these suggestions involve finding ‘the diamonds in the dirt’, and for this, we need some dirt to trawl through, to begin with. Additionally, each of these suggestions illustrate how we can take personal control of our wellbeing, to an extent, and that sometimes it is simpler to change ourselves than it is to change the world around us.

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Managing your employee’s return to work: Post COVID-19 lockdown

Posted by Pat Keogh

As the UK starts to ease lockdown we are speaking to many organisations about their return to work. How do you feel about your team coming back? Has lockdown given you time to reassess flexible working options? Do you have the right team in place? As well as keeping up-to-date with the latest Government guidance, here is our advice to employers looking to manage their team’s return to work: Communicating with your teams Phased return stages Workplace Risk Assessment Coming into and leaving the office New ways of using your workspace Managing holidays and employee wellbeing Communicating with your teams As an employer, it will be your duty to ensure that you discuss any plans for your employees to return to work as soon as possible. We suggest talking about: When they might return to the workplace How they will travel to and from work How health and safety is being reviewed and managed – you should share the latest risk assessment where possible, more advice on this will follow below Planned adjustments to the workplace, for example additional hand washing facilities, staggering start and finish times to avoid overcrowding or floor markings to help people keep 2 metres apart If there will be a phased return of the workforce, for example some staff returning before others Flexible/working from home arrangements and support Wherever possible, you should speak to your staff before making a decision or putting plans in writing. This can help you better understand their needs and concerns and supports an ethos of being included in organisational decisions. Phased return stages Where employees have been furloughed, you should consider to operate a phased return. It is necessary to reduce the numbers of people at the workplace to comply with social distancing, plus the workload is likely to slowly increase over time rather than immediately returning to pre-pandemic levels. WIth many worried about their employment status during and after this pandemic, it’s important to ensure that you communicate that the phased return is purely for employee welfare and safety and not necessarily a reason to doubt future employment. Across London and the rest of the UK, thousands of employees are being asked to return to work. But many employers are faced with a furloughed employee who refuses. If this situation arises, you will need to look for compromises. Be proactive in speaking to the employee to determine their specific issues and concerns and then work with them to look at alternative options. Can they work from home and, if an employee is unable to work from home, what specific health advice is available to you as their employer that could be shared with them. Could they be placed in an alternative role in the business in which they do feel safe? These factors will need to be taken into consideration during what is a concerning period for many. Workplace Risk Assessment Preparing the workplace is essential. Setting out clear standards and processes will reduce the worry for your teams and minimise health and safety risks for you and your employees. In every workplace, increasing the frequency of handwashing, and surface cleaning Government guidelines suggest that employers should make every reasonable effort to enable working from home as a first option. Where working from home is not possible, workplaces should make every reasonable effort to comply with the social distancing guidelines set out by the government (keeping people 2m apart wherever possible). Where the social distancing guidelines cannot be followed in full, in relation to a particular activity, such as meetings and group activity, you should consider whether that activity needs to continue for the business to operate, and, if so, take all the mitigating actions possible to reduce the risk of transmission between your staff. i.e: Ensuring the activity time is as short as possible Using markers/barriers to seperate people Side-to-side working rather than face-to-face Fixed teams/partnering to reduce the number of people each person comes into contact with. With limited people in the office/workplace per day. Introducing a one-way systems One-to-one assessments with every employee returning to the workplace must be conducted to establish the level of vulnerability to COVID19. The government has clearly stated that No one is obliged to work in an unsafe work environment. Coming into and leaving the office The government has highlighted that the steps that will usually be needed are: Staggering arrival and departure times at work to reduce crowding into and out of the workplace, taking account of the impact on those with protected characteristics. Providing additional parking or facilities such as bike racks to help people walk, run, or cycle to work where possible. Limiting passengers in corporate vehicles, for example, work minibuses. This could include leaving seats empty. Reducing congestion, for example, by having more entry points to the workplace. Providing more storage for workers for clothes and bags. Using markings and introducing one-way flow at entry and exit points. Providing handwashing facilities, or hand sanitiser where not possible, at entry and exit points and not using touch-based security devices such as keypads. Maintaining use of security access devices, such as keypads or passes, and adjusting processes at entry/exit points to reduce risk of transmission. For example, cleaning pass readers regularly and asking staff to hold their passes next to pass readers rather than touching them. See here for further government guidance on travelling to and from work. New ways of using your workspace Reduce movement and discourage non-essential trips within the office, for example, restricting access to some areas, encouraging use of telephones and cleaning them between use. Restrict access between different areas of a building. Ie. 2 people in the kitchen at any one time and Sharing the responsibility of wiping down surface areas upon leaving the space. Reducing job and location rotation. Introducing more one-way flow through buildings. Reducing maximum occupancy for lifts, providing hand sanitiser for the operation of lifts and encouraging use of stairs wherever possible. Managing use of high traffic areas including corridors, lifts turnstiles and walkways to maintain social distancing. Managing holidays and employee wellbeing As an employer, you know it's your duty to ensure that you support your team’s physical, mental and environmental wellbeing. Your approach to holiday is likely to depend on how much work there is in the pipeline. If, even after lockdown restrictions are lifted, workload is low, you may want to consider preventing employees from cancelling their previously approved holiday to ensure employees are available later in the holiday year when workload may increase. Quite fairly, you may have employees who are reluctant to take holiday whilst many travel restrictions are in place, as an employer you can also require them to take leave, subject to legal requirements under the Working Time Regulations/any procedure set out in a collective agreement or contract of employment. You should also be mindful of various issues including health and safety obligations in ensuring that employees have reasonable breaks for their mental and physical wellbeing. Share government health advice and helplines for wellbeing if they need further support that you feel you are not able give, To conclude, there are many factors to consider to ensure that you, your business and your employee are safe during this period of further transition back into the workplace. The CIPD suggests that it is important to ensure you can meet three key tests before bringing their people back to the workplace: Is it essential? Is it sufficiently safe? Is it mutually agreed? We are speaking to many clients who are phasing returns for their teams and will make it our duty of care as recruiters to share best practice. If you need any support with your plans, we are here to help. Contact your specialist recruiter for immediate support Here, email info@pro-recruitment.co.uk or call 020 7269 6333

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Bank of England Economic Update 2020

Posted by Pat Keogh

You are invited to Pro-Group's breakfast event and seminar in collaboration with the Bank of England on Thursday 21st May 2020, 08:00 to 10:30 in Central London (details upon formal invitation). Senior Economist and London Agent for the Bank of England, Rob Elder, will be presenting the Bank's latest updates and there will be a chance for Q&A. Timing could not be more appropriate and topics will include: Newly formed government COVID-19 Brexit Budget Announcements Economic figures Andrew Bailey, the new Bank of England Governor The seminar is a seated breakfast and the audience will be for CEOs, CFOs, Tax, Legal & Finance Partners and Heads of Tax. As with all Pro-Group hosted events, this is by invitation only and there is no charge. This will be our most popular and insightful event this year and we expect it to book out quickly. Please complete the form below to reserve your seat. Form ID:5398 For more information on this event, please contact Pat Keogh on 020 7269 6311 or pat.keogh@pro-recruitment.co.uk.

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5 Reasons Why Soft Skills Matter

Posted by Pat Keogh

Soft skills? What are they and why do they matter? Business leaders are becoming more aware of the importance of emotional intelligence, the capacity to be aware of, control, and express emotions and the ability to handle interpersonal relationships with empathy. These are skills which cannot be quantified but have a huge handle on the success of an individual’s career. According to the World Economic Forum, by the year 2020, more than a third of the desired core skill sets of most occupations will be comprised of skills that are not yet considered crucial to those jobs today – while soft skills in the workplace will be in higher demand than the narrow technical ones. Here are 5 reasons why soft skills matter. 1. Soft skills are the new hard skills It might be your hard skills that get you the interview, but it’s the soft skills that bring you success in your career. Soft skills like awareness, curiosity and the ability to connect, refer to personal attributes that enable someone to interact effectively and harmoniously with other people. They’re becoming the hard skills of today’s workforce - it’s not enough to be highly trained in technical skills without developing the understanding of how to work with others harmoniously. More and more organisations are including psychological testing as part of their recruitment process because of this. 2. The ‘super-powers’ that make us ‘super-humans’ We’re not describing the Marvel and DC characters on our cinema screens. We’re looking at real-life traits that enable us to foster trust, build relationships and make colleagues ‘human’, rather than cogs hired simply to be part of the organisational machine. Research conducted by Harvard University, the Carnegie Foundation and Stanford Research Center, has all concluded that 85% of job success comes from having well‐developed soft and people skills, and only 15% of job success comes from technical skills and knowledge (hard skills). We want to know that the colleagues around us can add value to each other emotionally as well as technically. Given that we spend more time with our colleagues than our friends and families, having a team around you who can empathise with you is what makes work a great place to be. 3. They are sculpting the future of work The workplace has evolved. The need for a dynamic of interpersonal skills are becoming ever more important and can’t be ignored. It’s important to be aware of the vital role that soft skills play within your team and your own personal development. The acts of listening, presenting ideas, resolving conflict, and fostering an open and honest work environment all come down to knowing how to build and maintain relationships with people. It's those relationships that allow people to participate fully in team projects, show appreciation for others, and enlist support for their projects. 4. They make good leaders What do we all look for in a good leader? Yes - technically skilled, experienced mentors all help to develop a good functional manager to maintain a status quo in the workplace. But what sets a manager and a leader apart is balancing those technical hard skills with the soft skills that are essential for a business to thrive. Having a leader who can make quick decisions and problem solve is important, but the ability to empower their team, understand team morale, and listen and recognise certain emotions in their employees is what truly makes a good leader. Gary Vaynerchuk has mentioned that although most people think of him as a "mouth," he promises he's really "an ear disguised as a mouth." As Vaynerchuk advises: "To be a great leader, you have to be a great listener." This rings true for everyone, inside and outside of work. And in the workplace, there’s nothing more motivational than having a leader who wants to understand you as a person, your goals as well as your gripes, as opposed to a boss who simply manages their team. 5. Soft skills cultivate a productive workplace Soft skills can be difficult to objectively measure (unlike technical qualifications, which can be tested). However, when you look around your own office, it is usually fairly easy to find those employees lacking soft skills. They are the ones unwilling to accept any kind of change, the ones unable to effectively work and communicate with their colleagues. As employers, as much as we should be supporting our staff in developing technical skills, we should be encouraging our teams to adapt and focus on emotional intelligence - this comes innate to some, but can also be taught through good leadership. Understanding, communication, empathy and harmony in the workplace makes the perfect recipe for success. For you as an employee, you want to be happy in your workplace; for you as an employer, you will see increased productivity. To conclude; people, it seems, still have one commanding competitive advantage over technology - the ability to understand other people. To express empathy, communicate persuasively, and seek common ground in a manner that allows groups to agree on an action plan and, more importantly, to feel collectively invested in its success, has far more value to an organisation that the collective focus on technical and vocational skills. It’s the companies that nurture these kinds of abilities that will have a competitive advantage which sets them apart from the competition. Soft skills are those that cost the least to develop, but in practice have the highest value. For more information about the skills organisations are seeking in the workplace or if you’re looking for more recruitment advice, please contact Pat Keogh on 020 7269 6311 or email pat.keogh@pro-recruitment.co.uk.

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New Year - New Home for Pro-Recruitment Group

Posted by Pat Keogh

This month is certainly an exciting one here for everyone at Pro-Recruitment Group. We’ve moved! Our wonderful team is expanding and we needed a bigger space to operate in. It’s been a huge operation to pull off and the process didn’t come without its fair share of challenges. We want to share this momentous occasion with you so sit back, grab a cuppa and we’ll tell you all about our big move. We decided at the beginning of 2018 that we needed more space. Then came the big decisions… What next? Where would we go? How would we decorate it? We wanted to minimise disruption for our amazing team here at Pro-Recruitment Group, so knew we wanted to remain within walking distance of our original office in Farringdon There are 3 reasons for finding a new home for The Pro-Recruitment Group: Space When we first moved into our last office, there were 20 of us and plenty of room. When we left, in December 2018, there were 65 and space was getting tight. We now have more of an open plan so we're all working closer together - and a fantastic new kitchen to get away from desks for lunch and to admire the view across St. Paul’s whilst making your brew!. Visibility In our last office, we were on the first floor of a building surrounded by jewelers! Although a fantastic part of town, wasn’t suited to our clients and candidates and while we really liked our neighbours, our new office in Blackfriars makes it easier for us to speak to you! Location What a difference a mile makes. By moving - we are now 3 mins walk from City Thameslink, 3 mins walk from St.Paul’s tube line and 4 mins walk from Blackfriars station. There are lots of reasons to be excited about the office. We wanted to ensure our team understood that the space belonged to them. It’s all the little touches that make the office feel like the Pro-Group home. Our meeting rooms are named after chess pieces - to help you with your strategic moves (get it?). The kitchen is fully equipped with a full breakfast bar, beer and wine fridges, and plenty of storage, everyone has lockers to store their personal belongings - all of this highlighted with the fact we have ceiling to floor windows and access to a balcony which runs right around the building and 360 views of Blackfriars and St Paul’s Cathedral. The office location is also a huge bonus, as people can now walk into town and access a range of shops in their lunch break. It has been an exciting twelve years for us and this is a proud moment for the Pro-Recruitment Group. We now work in an office that we can really call our own. Not only will the new office accommodate our expanding team, but it will also allow our family-feel culture to well and truly blossom. I would love for you to come and see it for yourself – you’re always welcome, drop me an email at pat.keogh@pro-recruitment.co.uk or give me a call on 020 7269 6311! Bring on the rest 2019 in our new home! Our new address is 69 Carter Lane, London, EC4V 5EQ

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How To Negotiate a Pay Rise Webinar - Recording

Posted by Pat Keogh

We’ve all thought about it… asking for an increase in salary. Salary negotiation is a key skill which will help you throughout your career. Whether you’re working in finance, tax, legal, HR or marketing and exploring salaries in your current role, this webinar will give you some essential advice to plan and execute a strategy to help you get you the pay rise you deserve. This webinar will explore: How to successfully negotiate a pay rise in your current role and for a new job or role The 3 key things you need to do to prepare BEFORE you go in and ask for a pay rise How men and women approach pay rises differently and what you can learn from each gender How to calculate what you are really worth to your firm What to do if your firm doesn’t agree with your pay rise How to answer the question from a recruiter “what’s your current package?” To speak to Pat about your recruiting needs or jobs in London or Nationwide, contact him on 02072696311 or pat.keogh@pro-recruitment.co.uk

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WEBINAR - How to negotiate a pay rise

Posted by Pat Keogh

We’ve all thought about it… asking for an increase in salary. Salary negotiation is a key skill which will help you throughout your career. Whether you’re a Solicitor or Accountant, a Tax Manager looking to get to Tax Partner, or just a Generalist HR professional exploring salaries in your current role, this webinar will give you some essential advice to plan and execute a strategy to help you get you the pay rise you deserve. This webinar will explore: How to successfully negotiate a pay rise in your current role and for a new job or role The 3 key things you need to do to prepare BEFORE you go in and ask for a pay rise How men and women approach pay rises differently and what you can learn from each gender How to calculate what you are really worth to your firm What to do if your firm doesn’t agree with your pay rise How to answer the question from a recruiter “what’s your current package?” When should you tune in? Thursday 22nd November 2018 - 12:30pm - 1:30pm GMT Join Heather Townsend and Pat Keogh and take away tips on how to best negotiate your salary and pay rise! Heather Townsend is the co-author of ‘‘How to make partner and still have a life’. She is the global expert in what it takes to make partner in a professional practice. In the last year, she and her team of coaches have helped several people make partner and worked with clients from all the major continents of the world. Pat Keogh is one of the founders and Managing Director of the Pro-Recruitment Group which was formed in 2007. As well as running the day-to-day business, Pat also recruits at Partner level across several sectors. He has an extensive network of Tax, Legal, Finance and HR professionals in both practice and in-house having recruited across several sectors for over 20 years. Can’t attend live? You should still register! We’ll be sending out slides and a recording of the webinar to all registrants.

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